Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: November 18, 1919 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Ada Evening News

Location: Ada, Oklahoma

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - November 18, 1919, Ada, Oklahoma                             AOtiiOn SOlh in the Top" in the St. Mihiel and Meuse-Argonne Theatre Today Cbening VOLUME XVL NUMBER 213 x. HOY SCOUT LKAOKR H1NKS IS TO RKSOHT WITH liOCA.li C1AJB ._- AJO> I'VTS 1' 1XTO THE WORK. TO DESVKKATH MKASURKS NKOESSARY TO SAVB COAL. The regular meeting of the Llous e.v the Club of Ada was held at tho Harris: CHICAGO. Nov. Hotel at eleven o'clock today. There! General of Railroads. VuUker D. was a good representation of the; nines, .and seven regional directors club present and it had as Us honor-! WiU meet here late today to coin- ed guest Mr. T. W. Griffith, deputy j Sjder the necessity of declaring a field commissioner of the Boy Scouts, nation wide freight embargo to cou- of America. (serve the country's meager supply Mr. Griffith addressed the Club al ol- Hint's is expected to length and gave the members many..arrive in Chicago at 2 p. in. pointers of interest in connection u Director General Hint's ap- with the work. 'proves recommendations of his reg- It might be well to mention directors an order may be Is- rael that the Lions Club of this cityi ,mmddiately which will mean has set about to inaugurate the; embargo on frf-i-ght; a Boy Snout movement in this city, cut in passenger train the exclusion of all other work tor; 'ice throughout the country; tho I the coming year, and it was Quite a -J dQwn p( al, treat for the club that they were. ,no throwing out of e-m- honored today with a visitation trom- or workmen. After the address of .Mr. Griffith: T VTV a motion was made and unanimous-1 AT CU'U'ITY ly carried that December 14 to -0 Ivl-NMM- Al be designated as Boy Scout week, and that during that time every et- d mills roct possible be put forth to ;U Mr. donations for the erection ot the for tho first lime Bov Scout Hall on tbe Fai-k location, and for other our- the s ,Ke o, Kus. poses eonnnected with the work s rft, hundred mJeiiirrt Of cr--- merce. the Women's Auxiliary and' the American Lesion be asked co-operate with the Lions Club' in1 making this drive a success, and j the committee appointed to do tlu- initial work of setting the cam-' paign started was K. W. Simpson.; li. Cunning, i'. A. Norris and Mr. Griffith, who proposes to come back to Ada and help us get st.iru-i! in the campaign. All civic bodies are requested to co-operate with the Lions Club and do all in their to help make I lie Boy Scout campaign a success. b, f wfts l w- ful, colllpU to ol Al STANDSTILL TODAY AT TI1K LIUKKTY. itu- Press WASHINGTON. Nov. IS- N'ego- i nations between bituminous coal 'miners uml operators in the central SlHiwiug at the Liberty Theater j competitive fields continued at a today and yesterday is seen David i standstill today, the operators again Griffith's biggest film production obtaining postponement ut the joint su.ee the "Birth of a Nation." conference of the wage scale com- "Hearts of the World" depicts Uu: minces on the ground that their the latest dev.ces of modern war- proposal had not been corn- lure and made in France. is11.', increases would am, f ibu, etfecl uf ,tu, niiners' demand might have on the future is1 filled from beginning to end with) the interest mi: methods 01 living i by the people that country and' the beautiful scenery of the: rountrv as it was and as .t is to-1 day. I As the "Birth of a Nation" look the people back to the days ot and and fought again the civil war so "Hearts of the World" will take yon bavk to time w lieu France posted the lirst notices tor; volunteer.- :o light the Huns. or. the dark iiays of Hie late' war until the American soldiers be- gan ret urn: home and dec iifed in tin- devastated countries- of Europe alter tour years war. You simply cannot afford to miss' this iiieunv. Special music matinee' that in determining eligibility and nmh: Schreiber's .splendid, soldier for admission to West orclu control of the mines. Assurances will be sought from several government de- partments before reph is made to ihe miners' demands for increased wages and shorter hours. The possibility of federal control of mines in case of popular dis- approval of higher coal prices was said to be receiving the close at- tention t'f the operators. l.KADKK OI'I'OKTl MTV I'XHIMKK SKKVICK MKX The Secretary of War has decided of a Putnl that any prior service he may have had in the army, whether under voluntary enlistment or thru the operation of the Selective Service Law. may be considered in con- nection with tbe requirements that lie shall have had not less than one year' service as an enlisted man. As the examination for army candidates takes place in February. 1020. a former service man by enlisting now for one year be eJi- to take the examination foi utivc committee meeting. February, 1920. This is an exceptional opportunity to secure a full military college traln- It is the.policy of the war de- i'ill a numbei CAK1.TOX OF HOl'STOX HAS AS DALLAS. Tex.. Nov. -O. S. Cari'nn of ll.uiston ha- resigned as national democratic leader Texas, it was learned here today, and his successor will be named at the next state democratic cratlc leaders of Texas predicted Thomas H. Love of Dallas as Carl- ton's successor. Love was assistant secretary and treasurer during the war. partment to fill a number of va- cancies ;i; West Point from the ranks of the army, as the worla war demonstrated that exceileni of- ficer mnlerial can be secured from tho ranks. .MONTANA OrlCKATOUS AND MINIMtS KKACII KKUMKXT Hi- the Ansmlatwl I'I-CM lilLI.lNG. Mont., Nov. IK... The Montana operators, representatives and mine workers of district 27, em- bracing the United States, readied an agreement for a resumption of proposed appearance here Thursday worn here, headquarters of the op-1 of M. Kre.i.sler, well known Austrian erators, it was announced today. ADA, OKLAHOMA, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 1919 Am I My Brother's Keeper? ABOVE all else this country needs SL nation-wide revival of old-fashioned prayer-meeting A religion that makes men realize that if there is a heaven, there must also of necessity be a religion that makes a man realize that every act is recorded on his own conscience, and that 'though that may slumber, it can never A religion that makes an employer understand that if he is unfair to his employes and pays them less than fair wages, measured by his ability and by their efficiency and zeal, he is a A religion that makes an employe know that if he does not give full a nd efficient service, he too is a religion that makes a farmer, who packs bad fruit at the bottom and deceives the buyer by the good fruit on the top, realize that he is a thiet just as much as the one who robs a. hen roost at A religion that makes a man who ribs a railroad of its fare, or its freight bill, know that he robs himself of all right to feel that he is an honest '.'c A religion that makes a man realize that by driving too hard a bar- gain with "his servant, his employe, or his merchant, he can be just as much a profiteer as the seller or producer who swindles by false weight, false packing or false religion that will teach church members who fail to contribute to the extent of their ability to the support of religion, and that compels them to recognize that if they are paying their pastor less than a living salary, they are robbing God and man religion that will make the laboring man, who, by threats or by actual violence aeainst the non-union man, strives to keep him out of em- ployment he is at heart a murderer and is murdering the indi- viduality, and the liberty of his fellowman, and is displaying a hatred which, if it has the opportunity, will commit physical A. religion that will make the politician who yields principle for the sake of party, who worships at the feet of any class and sells his soul for political preferment know that he is ;iot only a coward and a poltroon, and unworthy of the respect of any decent man, but which will also make him see that' he is helping to murder human liberty, as great a crime as mur- dering the individual In short, we need a revival of that religion which will make every man and woman strive in every act of life to do that which, on the great Judg- ment Day, they will wish they had done, as with soul uncovered they stand before the Judgment Seat of the Eternal. Until the people of this nation accept and live this religion there will be -strife where there should be peace, there will be strikes-and lockouts and murder where there should be co-operation and harmony; there will be hatred where there should be friendship and love. In the Golden Rule, followed in the fullness of the spirit of this kind of religion there would be found a solution for every business trouble; there would be created friendship between employer and employe; capital and labor would work in harmony and with efficiency, efficiency for the capital and efficiency for the labor, with profit to both. Religion of this kind is not measured by the hope of a Heaven here- after, but by the full fruition now of "Peace on earth to men of good will. It is not merely the chanting of hymns here or in the world to come, but it is in the recognition and full implication by rich and by poor, by learned and unlearned, that each one is indeed his brother's keeper, that we can bring this country and the world back to safety. A nation-wide acceptance of this, the only true religion in action, would bring business peace and world peace where there is now turmoil, and merTwould then cease to seek to gain their aims by lawless acts of immoral- ity but would in spirit and in deed follow the Divine command, "All things whatsoever ye would that men do to you, do ye even so to them." A.MICmc.-YX LI'HilOX CANfKI.S OK AUSTRIAN VIOLINIST By Iho AKwocialcd FrrwH LOUISVILLE, Ky., Nov. IS.--The THE TOBACCO FIGHT STILLPRBGRE! By lliu I'rMS ST. LOUIS, -Mo., Nov. 18.--Tho 6 RETURNS THREE CENTS THE COPY FVEN WORSE THAN REED GOT AT ARDMORE, THIS MAN IS HUSTLED OFF ON THE FDIST TRAIN. NOT IN MANY YEARS HAS CON- GRESS BEEN SO BEREFT OP CO-OPERATION, SAYS JOHNSON. By the AHMtotri APPLETON Minn., Nov. Earnest Lundeen, former congress-! man from the fifth district of Min-' nespia, who was locked in a re- frigerator car on an out-bound car at Ortonville, Minn., by the sheriff and citizens, after he was prevented from addressing a meeting in op- position to the league of nations there last night, early today was on his way on a passenger train to Minneapolis, "more determined than to continue his fight against By ALBA B. JOHNSON. (President of Railway Business As- the league of nations." Londeen arrived in Ortoaville sociation and Representative of Co-Operative Committee on Rail- way Legislation, Abstract of an address delivered before the Amer- ican Mining Congress at St. Louis Monday evening, Nov. 17, 1919.) early last night to speak on "The! Not for many years has congress in dealing with a problem of first importance been so nearly bereft ol co-operation from agriculture, in- dustry, commerce and the press as in its present effort to re-establish our railways under private orepa- tlon. Brit'ish-Wilson League." He was; With full-fledged plans congress warned by the sheriff, John, Gowan, has been glutted. This is a main meuibe-s of the American Legion'-reason why great numbers of citl- local post and others not to speak, zens have dumb. Jhe When Londeen appeared on the stage he was rushed to the railroad depot by the sheriff and others. A freight train was just pulling out and Londeen was forced into a re frigerator car and the door locked. Trainsmen heard his shouts and he was released before the train reach- ed here, a distance of about twenty miles. Londeen has been touring Minnesota, Iowa and South Dakota for the American CTub of Miune- is president. sota, of which he speaking against the tions. of advice and the unshakeable faith of each doctor in his own prescrip- tion have given men normally In- telligent and vocal the headache and the jockjaw. Some hundreds of com- mercial organizations which voted on a referendum of the Chamber of Commerce of the United States, the polls closing July 24 last, have not said a word or done a thing about it new aspects of a vital kind have come constantly under consideration down to date THE OLD REGULAR ARMY BY A SOLDIER When the United States went t.o war with Germany it had no army, but it did have soldiers. Against the great could army ___ leering and by drafts, from the Na- leasue of na- and are still coming. Agriculture 'has not yet spoken on the principles 1 which should underlie government regulation of private railway tr.nn- I agement. i National concurrence under these 1 conditions could not be reached i and lias not been reached. 1C this condition is permitted to continue, congress will determine this mo- mentous question not in the light of well formed public opinion but in a Babel of tongues. It. is now or never. How shall opinion be unified and registered? That question has re- tional Guards and military fitness, the Civilians of in the dark- days when Germany was fighting to dispose of her en- body pet scheme and his own ;et down to objects which are imperatively essential. They said they would welcome any could raise an army allies, the American soldiers for of railway de- velopment. The Railway Business to save her j Association, of which T am presi- aes, oldiers was invited to participate :md to France. They were the men of j responfied with enthusiasm. the regular divisions, the regular The conferee's formed themselves soldiers, sailing east upon a strang- jnlo what is called the Co-opera -ive or and more hazardous journey than i Committee on Railway Legiplal on. Columbus had when he brought theJThe chairman is Harry H. Merrick, now world into tup world. prr-siclent of the Chicago Association Those men. officers and privates, of Commerce and the Mississippi wore carrying the new world to the Valley Assocation. The eleven as- old world for the salvation of all sedations of which the charter mem- the world. They were the men hers are officers are all -.ess whose highest word was duty and bodies. The reason why' the name th-r c'tity wa- to the United Slates, if the committee contains no rofer- o'nlv few of them were to come fnce to business is that co-oporation back and only a few of them did is desired from farmers. To avoid come back, oiilva few Of the soldiers misunderstanding, tins was doubt- uiiiclly to carry the American Hag to battlefields. They did not requiie any emotion, ask for it. or it. The rimy which kept the Roman sentinel in the lava at business man and a farmer; no alone because I happen to be both but because a farmer these days is either a business man or a bank- i rupt 'Counting farmers as business i'ompoii was duty which naked men_ Iheir service. It was performed and the men who performed it died. Tliey were the videttes of the Ol ;VI AX I I W L 11 llu >v u .'X u a L I 1 till I violinist, Jias been cancelled by the i Louisville fine arts league, upon complaint of loca! chapters Of the I'XTll, nKt'HMIIKIt SKSSIOX i American Legion. The Legion ofl'i- cers say their action was based on a WILL KKCKSS policy of Christ in 11 the National Women's Union against tobacco will r be one of education, not legislation, delegates attending the "Victory Convention" asserted today It is emphasized, however, IE OF WALES GETS IBRITISH FOR THE LEAGUE REGARDLESS By t.hc I'ross NEW YORK, Nov. Edward, Prince of Wnles, arrived at Jersey City at o'clock Mils' morning' preparatory to a five day visit to New York, Ry Uic Associated PrcM that hi Nearly an hour before the I'rince tl the section of the IJe.nn- the action the convention yesier- bv ing its irivv I n P HCL lUli U' LIlU _______ I cers say their action was based on a voting down a resolution served for his tram had been Aasocmuxi I'.esn i resolution adopted by t he aii anil-tobacco legislative of all spectators. Three In Nov lS.--Hru--l Convention at Minneapolis, which does not mean the union soldiers of Thirteenth Ir passed the Koch railroad bill all condemned all efforts to generate ailv wny its tight against, from Camp Meyer and a bant last night, the House to-1 for Germany and her al- .linod up as a guard of honoi v' virtuallv took a recess to be lip" ol operas, performers I wjl, as formerly; tho track to the water's eflge, Nov. on the reservations to the Ver- sailles treaty by the United States senate and President Wilson's threat 10 withdraw the treaty, the Chroni- cle, which is supposed to sometimes reflect the views of Premier Lloyd business associations are invited to join or help. What, will the Co-operative. Com- mitteo urge upon This is re.it American army which was notjfor committee to say, but I hope in --xistencc. They were the tirst of i they will put some question? to all a great nation -to appear. They were are engnsed in Agriculture, in- the furertinners of a force to dustry or commerce. These-are the 1 insign.iticant in their numbers, con- questions: elusive in their portent. 1. Do you not believe that aoart Their devotion was complete. The from misdeeds of railway managers divisions came back, but not as k and financiers, which should be re- went. It remained in France as cas-i strained, and apart from their as- ualtics. It came back as replace- i sertions of poverty, which are a metU" The country is trying to put! matter of business judgment, the li-oxei'in rhf rifle's of tlie regular! impairment of railway credit has I divisions, all divisions have had i been in large part due to the policy in the localities to which; the federal and state sovern- ithey belonged. The regular regulation of rates? to the whole nation you not belleve that jihey were all it had when it, went to' war. unprep.iie iiccoi .nj. that all rates of al: such custom, and they did all for soldiers time In any- expected to do any nation emergency, could be of the federal authorities, who must sanction adequate total revenue from above reflects the feeling con-! all sources? re. development sylvania terminal in Jersey City re- George, says: served for his train had been cleared! "Cnl'ess tho league is to fall nl- hundred' together, other nations must go Infantry ahead for some years without Ameri- band vJorejca's participation, and we hope they i in- LI..- i IJQ von not stantly gaining in strength, that of rajiway development Regular army has been neglected j requires among other tilings that and :iow is entitled to the best congress supplement its present stal- Harris. j utory policy of restriction only by io be u-v mt'ans of operas, performers j hostile countries ulur session of congress In Decem- ber- "I-1 TION GKXIvKAIjS TODAY continue as formerly o eh-dren or- tho boaU wee to take him .mo, not I'KACK MKKTS HALF By tho Awioclatcd Nov The supremo, cotinc of the 'peace conference do- Ui mv AB80cintod PrMi .1 i the capture of ten generals more -than one hundred other cided today to inform Premier Venl- zelos of Greece that it could only confirm the general view of the con- Terence concerning the provisional oftlcers at Omsk, according to an official statement issued today by the Soviet government nt Moscow. Admiral Shoaksk's army is being character of the occupation of Smyr- pursued in an eastward direction na by Greek forces. the statement added. feds 'of nicotine in any form what- soever." said Mi's. Anna A. Gordon, of Kvanston. 111., president of the organization. New York we e aiu nfc P AmeHcan ORAN 0 PIDS. Mich. Nov. j enacting that rates for each jroup of roads as a whole shall be such as to yield revenue sufficient for j necessary expenses and for the credit i basis of adequate improvements and s1 extensions? elected national masier VL me 5. Do you not believe that an in- tlonal Grange at the annual election! dispensible requirement In putting oiiii-ii Jt-o i VMH.HJII LUI i-mj o VTJ i ill i t and Brigadier Gonera" Peter WJ that we have addressed represanta-j John C. Ketchum of Has- he Always ou a busing (Waitings, Mich., was re-elected national! that the regulatory authorities at treasurer. (workable intervals ascertain for a 0 anr rgaer r r Davidson welcomed the Prince onltions to Wnshlngton regarding the I behalf of the army while Admiral' reservations. In Justice to our Notice Cemetery Association. The Cemetery Association will meal Wednesday afternoon at four' at Criswoll's undertaking parlors. All persons interested are urged to be present as there Irn-portan-t busi- ness 'to be taken care of. It sentative of tho navy. the lead." They are still felling how happened in the Fifth district. And By tho Associated Prcso WASHINGTON, Nov. 18.- -Presl- WKATHER ident Wilson today vetoed the bill I restoring to the interstate com- happcnen jn tne I'lf.n district. Ana i LU LUO we wonder -which orie of them wasi Pair tonight and Wednesday with merce commission Its pre-war pow- for each group in order to attrac; T nn.4nn fnTnnai.n-t.ifa ni> fContinnpd on PAITA Constitution. little change In temperature.' findings as to such needs and thel estimate of the necessary revenue? 5. Do you not believe 'that in e- timattng the net Income require 1 (Continued on Page Bight.)   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 145 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication