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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: November 13, 1919 - Page 1

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Publication: Ada Evening News

Location: Ada, Oklahoma

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - November 13, 1919, Ada, Oklahoma                             Showing Today "The Hoodlum" Mary Pickford's Second Wonder Production from Her Own Studios. The First Since "Daddy Long-Legs" ft THIS DISTRICT t RETURNS VOLUME XVI. NUMBER 209 ADA, OKLAHOMA, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 1919 THREE CENTS THE COPY CONDITION IS INDICATED BY I ADOPTED AT NA- HIGH LIVING COST ItKPORT- TIONAI. MEETING AT MIN- KD TO THK STATE DE- I NBA VOWS DIRECTED P i OHIKFI.Y AT REDS. By tho Associated Prcu WASHINGTON, Nov. tho whole world Is struggling with the increased cost of living, is In-j dicated in reports to the state de-1 partment. The increases in Europe i are particularly high although in j Latin-America the governmnets anxious ever the situation and Rrej trying to find means of combatting i the difficulties presented by the high prices of commodities deemed essential. In Portugal the government. In I an attempt to lower the cost of llv-i inc. has placed, 'through the Minis-! tor of Finance, a >art of .its gold! reserves In the banks of Lisbon. In Kngland, the cost of living! above pre-war level is figured at 115 i per cent for September and 120 per; cent for October, .is to actual ne-i cesslties of life and based upon! average living conditions of wagei earners, A more distinct rise has occurred in the cost of commodities so far as the other elements of; population in England -ire oon-i cerned, being unofficially estimated by some at approximately 135 pel- cent with, a steady upward trend. In Sweden, figures furnished by the Swedish government indicate that the cost of living has increas- ed 157 per cent over the cost in June, 1914. In the cities the in- crease has been very much greater than the average for the country. The Argentine government has suggested to other South American countries and discussed with them a international arrangement with a vie doing away with import du- ties on unmanufactured food prod- ucts as one means of cutting down the high cost of living. Information which has reached the state depart- ment regarding this plan is to the effect that a suggestion has been made that a conference be called by the Argentine minister for for- eign affairs to discuss this question of exchange of real necessities of life free of customs charges. In Brazil the tariff is being revised with a view to reducing the cost of living in that country. In Uruguay the percentage of increase of present cost of living over the cost in June, 1914, is estimated by the Vruguayan government at: Food 52 pet cent, fuel 4S per cent, light 75 i-IT cent, rent no increase. Yellow Paint Is Applied to Pair of Open Souses MINNEAPOLIS, Nov. rations placing the American Leg- ion on record against anti-American propaganda and activity were adopt- ed at the Legion convention here this morning. Resolutions adopted include: "Demanding adoption of a feder- al constitutional'- amendment bar- ring from citizenship the American born children of orientals and others not eligible for citizeuslrrD. "Demanding deportation of alien slackers and enemy aliens interned during the war, with selective ad- mission of foreigners. "Authorizing appointment of a le- gion committee to'spread vthe teach- ing 01 the legion's doctrine of "100 per cent Americanism" among the veterans of the war and aliens in this country. "Demanding a "change in the de- partment of justice from passive organization to a militant, active branch whose findings will bo promptly acted upon by the execu- tivo authority." "Opposition to release of "politi- cal prisoners" to show that "there is no home in America for sedi- tion." "Opposition to organization of so- cieties for relief of civilian popula- tion of Germany, Austria and Hun- gary unless these societies be au- thorized by congress." Leonard Wlthington, of Hawaii, former Harvard football star, was author of the Americanism program adopted by the convention as the chief resolution to combat anti-Am- erican propaganda by teaching Am- erican Ideals. The convention asked that war department Oifflclals responsible for "tender treatment of conscientious objectors, who were aliens, be sum- marily dealt with. DID THESE VIOLATE THE A part of Allen was painted low Tuesday night, according to! Sheriff Duncan, who returned from; an official visit to that city last night. It seems that the entire city was of one mind Tuesday and felt; that in order to show the propv! spirit of patriotism every businesSj house should be closed for thej day. For some business houses j failed to close, but continued open! thru the day transacting business asj usual. During the night some zens of the town-- name and number' these two houses and proceeded to apply to each of them a coat of yellow paint. Hy'the Associated PrCM DUQUOIN, 111., Nov. ing with an order issued by the local union miners following a mass meeting here late yesterday, all hoisting engineers, firemen, pump- ers, mule feeders, and other union men who had been permitted to keep the mines at Duquoin in work- I ing order during the strike, loft 'their posts fast night. The mine superintendents, managers, foremen, assistant bosses and office clerks .were Immediately called upon to fill the plates ot Tile mvn wno had quit. Whether this is ft violation of the injunction granted the government was not generally known- among either miners or operators, owing to the fact that the call was made at a mass meeting and not directly by officials of Duquoin miners. ily llic rrem SPRINGFIELD, 111., Nov. Information received here today by operators said union man left their post in two mines at Benton, fol- lowing similar action at Duquoin. The walkout was said to be a protest ag-iinst international officers obey- ing the federal court mandate to call off the strike. D The End of a Perfect Day SCHOOLS AM) OKK1CI-: BVIl.D-i AXOTHBR NflCTCliXKD IXCJS CLOSK WHILE V.MTK1) 11 POX 1JY SI' CHARITIES WORK AS XKVFTR RKKORK SOLDIER It-KDK AT OKXTRALIA, AVASHTNGTOX. By News' Special Service MUSKOGEE. Okln., Nov. [In- Associated Wash., Nov. Emptv coal bins and a badly failing! George Pnxlon, of Centraliu, former u soldier was fired upon before day- gas pressure greeted the nrst cold IodRy as he WM patrolllllR the road near Centralla at the point when the alleged Industrial Work- er of i he World was lynched Tuesday night. National guardsmen, police land lormer soldiers searched the vi- jcinity several hours for the man vho tired the shot. Paxton was not wave of the winter Wednesday morning, and' Muskogee an- other drop of at least 10 degrees tonight and consequent suffering. From all over the city came re ports of failing gas pressure. Mos of the ward schools were dismissed! before noon because of the gasj Criminal information against 26 failure and Superintendent R. J.j alleged members of the I. W. W. been prepared for filing at the was a tour of a ioui ot MANY OF THEM DISPOSED TO AWAIT THK ORDERS OF THEIR LOCAL OFFICERS. By the Associated PI-CBH CHICAGO, Nov. coal miners today were expected to return to their work in Increasing numbers in many of the counties and smaller fields, but what they would do in the great fields of Kansas and Illinois, amBfig others, remained uncertain. The miners gen- erally showed a disposition to await formai notification by their imme- diate union officers of the strike recall, sent out by John L. acting president of the United Mine Workers. While the recall order had been received in Illinois, Frank Farring- by county len. All information attorney Herman was undei-- stood, would allege .either partici- pation in or criminal knowledge schools in the afternoon to find out what conditions were. Central High school is equipped to burn coal and was not dismissed. j Office buildings were cold Wed-h- hew ,Ml Tuosdav of nesday morning, and somu of of the American Le- notnbly thp federal building, lurnenl during armistice day pa- to coal. N j rade. Not a Pound of was available in any retail yard of the city, a'nd only a limited quantity of wood. Prospect? for more coal were not rosy in spite of the fact that the coal strike is called off. THOSE WHO DON'T LIKE IT HERB SHOULD GO BACK TO COUNTRY OF .BTRTH- HE SAYS. BUFFALO, N. Y.r Nov. American people are growing, 1m- .pa-tieat with foreign agitators and unless the attitude changes the door that has always been open to Europe may be shut Herbert Hoov- er declared here today in an ad- dress at the convention' of Ameri- cans of Polish ancestry, "Many foolish ideas are being cir- culated among the foreign born population of Uie United. Mr. Hoover said. "Many of those foreign born are interesting them- selves In the destruction of our pri- mary institutions and defiance of our laws. The American people are fast losing patience with this atti- tude. It may develop out of this the "open door" toward Europe will be in' a large measure, closed'. But worse than this, there may develop out of it a prejudice against every speaker of a foreign language in the United States. It creates preju- dice against extending aid to those counlries in .Europe from which our foreign born populations spring." Any needed reforms in the Unit- ed States, he asserted, would "tie carried out by those whose parents have grown up amid our institu- tions and those who have become in sentiment and spirit, a part of our people." "It is fortunate that the Polish population of the United States have been but little influenced by these forms of he con- tinued. "If a Pole exists who has associated himself with the orga- nizations that' devote themselves to the destruction of our Institutions that Pole is not only disloyal to the United States, but he is en- deavbring to paralyze the arm that is supporting the Independence of his own mother country. Those who are dissatisfied always can choose the alternative of retiring to 'the country from which they came." Ada Playhouses At the American today and to-! morrow is sten :he second big sen-en production 'by Mary ford, ;nadfi Jn )HT own studio. j TafC'DS of the American who; if enough to sue Miss; ton, district president, said he did not believe the men would return to work. Alexander Howatt, president of Kansas miners numbering ap- proximately also was quoted as saying that he did not look for a cenoral resumption of production' in that field at present. i In Indiana it was indicated thalj mining on an extensive scale could I not bf> resumed before next wcekl a; the earliest. j In district twenty-one, Arkansas, I Missouri and Oklahoma, it was said that the men would probably renmij to work today. F o c h on Armistice Says American Spirit HVmA i'ftr Future enough t. nope iur r mure in -Daddy Long Legs- several days ago, are. congratulating Ritling before a Uttered soft pine Mat topped table, at the Hotel des Invalides, with a "scratchy" pen Marshal Ferdinand Koch, who just a i themselves upon their good luck and jhave been showering Mr. McSwain 'with encouragements to bring to us these splendid programs more often. To those who enjoyed "Daddy Long Legs" we sincerely recom- A RIGHTEOUS DECISION The righteous decision of Judge Anderson in the case of the coal strike rings true to Americanism, to the con- stitution of the United States and to the laws of our country. It was a necessary and timely rebuke ,to the anarchists, to bolshevists and the foreign labor leaders who have come to this country to destroy it. Let every genuine American citizen to the sup- port of the American flag, of our American officials, of our American laws and of our American traditions. These anarchists, and bolshevists and reds and their, leaders and their sympathizers should be relentlessly driven from America and sent back to the European countries from which they were driven or fled. There is no room in America for such as these. Vicious, de- praved, dwarfed antl deformed mentally, they seek to destroy and disrupt what they even haven't the mental capacity to understand or grasp. The labor unions of the country should begin imme- to purge themselves of leaders who seek to taint them with this spirit of destruction and revolution, and no union can stand that is led or officered or guided or controlled by such leaders. year ago superintended tne great mond thal see ..Tne Hoodlum" drive which ended1 the world war, i before you pronounce "Daddy Long ole an Armistice day message to! Legs" as Miss Mary's very best. r erfor the American people: "On the occasion of the first an- niversary of the armistice we can- not forget the generous aid and en- ergetic co-operation brought by erica to the common camse. The en- thiiiiiasm with Which the Americans answered our call and their heroism on the battlefields of France where many of them have fallen show in the greatest way possible their fidel- ity to our -I'donl and give for tin; future the assurance of union which alone can guarantee us the benefits of peace won at the price of such heavy sacrifices." owe so much to Marshal Foch declared. "Tell. thW that my 'heartfelt wish Is that bondsi Df love and friendship which hold us together In the war will grow stronger year by year In ,the future. Wo realize how essential to our victory just a year ago was the aid of America and the hun- dreds of thoii'sands of troops she poured Into Francs; each month." Attorney Palmer says re- tall food prices have been reduced 15 per cent. What does Mrs. Pal- mer Street Journal. If you laughed at her perform- ances as an orphan, you just must see her as a street urchin or tene- ment waif. -If you laughed before, you will scream at this. On the other hand the late pic- ture, like that of the orphan's htart-" Association Wants the Championship By 'li.i Press CHICAGO, Nov. Chicago Athletic Association is to make a determined effort to. land the nation- al A, A. U. Indoor' track and field championships this winter. This is the announcement of John L. Bar- chard, chairman of the C. A, A. athletic committee, who will attend the national .convention of the A. A. U. In Boston Nov. 16, to -press Chicago's -bid. The games, if awarded to Chi- cago, will- be stage'd in the Coli- seum, nnd every athletic organiza- tion and university in the 'country will be Invited to enter Its star ._-..-- athletes la the competition. that will drive home to you the] -Awarding the meet to Chicago fViifl 11 Vjn til t-'ifiR i. i_ ii_... i_ _.___ conviction that like these should not exist in the Land of the Free, etc. In attending a production of this kind you will Jiot only .develop and would be the biggest boost Western athletics could receive, said Martin Delaney, physical director' of the C. A. A. "The Indoor championsMps have never been held In the West, your pwn mind by getting I j ]OOk for a tremendous boom in an inside view of these' this winter In line with OKLAHOMA CITY, Okla., Nov. Robertson today is- sued his Thanksgiving .proclamation for Thursday. November 27, calling on the people of the state to ob- serve that day by "ceasing from ac- customed labor and gathering at the established places of worship there to return thanks to Almignty God for the many blessings vouch- safed to us as individuals, asTa state and as a nation, during the past year. "Let us unite in a movement for Americanization of all our people, nnd frown upon ill-advised propa- ganda of the agitator, whether he be native born or alien, let us prize nnd cherish our .political liberty' and drive out those who seek over-j throw of representative by nu'aiis of sabotage, direct action I and other lawless forms. "Let. us pray for a 'better con- dition of those who are compelled to toil; for a deeper sympathy from j those, who for the time being, act' as supervisors and employers of. labor and for a more full and com-i plete appreciation, .of the fact that we are 'our brother's keeper.' GOVERNMENT TO THE V1EW.THAT HOHENZOLFJERN IS POUTICAL REFUGEE .TO BE PROTECTED. THE HAGUE, Nov. Emperor William came to Holland a year ago last Monday. Since that time there has been no demand, officially or unofficially, for his ex- tradition or delivery up to the allies, nor has Holland at all changed its viewpoint toward him. The Associated Press learned this Saturday from sources that are un- questionable. Holland's viewpoint regards William Hobenzollern may be stated franlcly as follows: The Netherlands, which for centuries has accorded political refuge to all, con- siders the former .emperor and the crown prince as as royalty, but as persons entitled, to the same rights as any plain Johana Schmidt.who fled to Holland during the war. The principle is so held by the government and also by the press of Holland nothing is likely to change it ,it is asserted. The-Dutch government has reach-., ed a determination as to its conduct in the event the surrender of Wil- liam Hohenzollern is asked for. No official statement has been made in this connection but the Associated' Press learns that Holland considers the former emperor beyond extra- dition, as there is no possible way legally to hold him as a criminal. If they desired to insist upon" the privilege, both the Hohenzollerns would be free 10 go where they liked, as they are in no sense pris- oners. However, because they feel that they would embarrass Holland even further, they apparently have agreed to remain where they now father at Amerongen and his son at-Wieringen. If the one-time emperor aad crown prince desired to return to Germany, they would be permitted to go. While It is possible that Frederick William some day may re- turn to-Oermany, official circles in The Hague are inclined to the belief that William Hohenzollern is con- tent to settle down to the life of a country gentleman at Doom, where he has been permitted to buy a small estate because his long stay at Amerongen seemed unfair to Count von Bentinck, whose castle he occupied. Altho a number of purported in- terviews with the former emperor have been published, the fact is that he never has spokn for publication since his arrival in Amerongen, and to the request of the Associated Press correspondent for a statement on the occasion of the anniversary of his taking refuge here, he sent a reply saying that he had not chang- ed his determination not. to speak. Christmas Sale To Be Managed By Mrs. Tom Hope HOLSHEVIKI AND ENKMIKS TO NEGOTIATE FOR PEACE HELSINGFORS, 13. negotiations between the Esthonians and the Bolshevik! will begin Saturday, it was announced here today. The Liuthlanians will not participate In the negotiations. Mrs. Tom Hope has been appoint- ed manager of the Christmas sale of Red Cross for the city of Ada. The sale is scheduled to begin December 1 and last till December 31. The purpose of this annual Christ- inas sale is to raise money for the anti-tuberculosis campaign in Okla- homa. It is stated on reliable au- thority that people die of tuberculosis in this state every year and a determined campaign is being carried on to relieve the state of this scourge. Mrs. T. H. Sturgeon of Oklahoma City was in Ada yesterday in the interest of this campaign and said that the state is being thoroughly organized for the sale of the Red 'Cross seals. but you get your m'bney's worth in real, worth-while entertainment and you encourage the management to continue such programs as "The Miracle "Hearts of the and anything as elevatling as the two new numbers received from the'Plckford studios, .Attend the matinee if possible. days and nights you may aee this splendid picture. the astonishing revival in all sports. I am confident that we could stage the indoor championships with very successful results." The date for the indoor champion- ships Is usually set for early in March. KANSAS COAL MISTERS i ARE REPORTED IDLE, By tho Anaoclittod Prcns j PITTSBURG, Kan., Nov. i The Kansas coal mines still were: 100 per cent idle today, it was an-j Fair tonight and Frlda with from both the miners and ing temperature. operalors' headduarters. WEATHER FORECAST WHY USE NEWSPAPER SPACE? The problem of any proposition seeking to win favor of the public, is to attract Attention, to get talked about. No public entertainment could get attention simply -by passing word about it from mouth to mouth. That is why people getting up any kind of a public assembly always rush to the newspapers the first thing. It is more" difficult for a man to his business talked about if he refuses to use newspaper space. No one is interested to help him secure this publicity. Few people will take any pains to tell others how good stuff he may He may have ever so, good a show win- dow, do not stop much 'to look into show windows nowadays. But people always will stop to read the contents of a newspaper, because they pick it up in their own homes at their convenience. Scores of people will notice an advertisement where one would stop to Took at a show window:   

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