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Ada Evening News: Wednesday, October 29, 1919 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News (Newspaper) - October 29, 1919, Ada, Oklahoma                                 Coming Thursday The Greatest of All Emotional Screen Stars  u Nazimo in War Brides—American Theatre Thursday and Friday.  ®he gfoa toning  VOLUME XVI. NUMBER 196  ADA, OKLAHOMA, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 29, 1919  THREE CENTS THE COPY  HERCHMTS TO BEH BAIM 0  What’s    Att This Commotion About?  tiPFMtKR FROM ADVERTISING EXD OF THE BATTLE OVER THG OFI-iUTMFNT\ ATK) S A 1.    FORTY -SI ATH AMENDMENT  CASH REGISTER TO    SEEMED    IX    SIGHT  BK HERE THEN.    TODAY  Oct. 29.—The  Mr. C A. Ylinkers, of The Nation-  1 ‘* ********  lr **» a1 Cash Register Co., of Dayton. WASHINGTON,  Ohio was in the city yesterday end of the senate battle over the and made arrangements to have de- forty-sixth amendments written into livered in the cliv on the evening of the peace treaty by the foreign re-Nov. : a lecture by W. E Brennen lations committee seemed in sight of the same company and tv same today, the leaders hoping that a department, a "pep" lecture for mer- vote on the last of the group could chants and business men.    be taken today or tomorrow. The  The lecture will be in the audi- amendment was presented by Sen-ditorium of the East Central State  ator  Moses, Republican of New Normal and will be free to every Hampshire, and would exclude all business man in the city. Mr. Bren-  0 f the British Dominions from vot-n&n is familiar with every problem j n  my league of nations con-of the retail mercant, and while it  trovers y to which one of them was might appear that the lecture would  a  p^ty.  necessarily be for the benefit of the  A     which    was    not touch- s  National Cash Register Co., it might ^  Dp J  by the foTe[gn rolaUons   be well to state that this cornein is     waa     injected    Into    the  so big and has reached >uch gi- f igbt  today by Senator Gore, Demo-gam.c proportions that its scheme  cn( f Qklahoma>  who presented sn of ope rat.one takes into account     d . ,  Artl  ,     12    propos .  many activities which are good for ^    ._____I."__LTL  the local business man that are ab-  ing that under the league no nation  solutes free from all appearance.    *°  i0  w*r; nnUl an tdnaory  of commercialism     vole of the    sha11 have been   The lecture will be illustrated taken, a*  an  additional condition  with a stereoptican and all mer-    arbitration had failed,  chants, clerks and the wives of mer- The debate centered during much chants, rre urged to attend.    of the discussion around the treaty  The lecturer goes into detail in- provisions for an international la-sofar as the problems of the retail bor organization. Efforts to alter men are concerned, and hit vast ex- this provision are to be made by  perience of many years in a1! parts several senators.  ASSERTS THAT HE IS IN CLOSE I MAYOR KITCHENS COURTEOUS,  TOUCH WITH THE MINERS AND STRIKE GAN BE AVERTED  RUT BURDENS OF JONES AND DEAL TOO MUCH TO BE BOTHERED.  By the Associated Pre**    About    the    middle    of    last week  WAQHTNUTfiN Ort 29 —Federal the officers and membeis of tho  Fn^ id^nilSator Harry A OM- Chamber of Commerce met in lunch-Fuel Administrator Harry A. Oar ^ ^ ^  Rarris Hotel to  consider  field, discussed the threatened ^ question of whether or not the strike of bituminous ™ mei *    i    body would undertake to_ investigate  with Secretary Tumulty at the question of managerial form of White House. He was summoned j __  here from Williams College, of which he is president  Dr. Garfield who still has authority to function as fuel administrator asserted that he was in close touch with the strike situation and expressed confidence that a settlement would be reached without a walkout of the miners.  The fuel administrator would not discuss his conference with Mr. Tumulty, but his visit to the White House revived suggestions that the fuel administration might again be called into action to exercise the  government, looking to the advisability of inaugurating a campaign for the same if the city of Ada found advisable to do so.  At that meeting the editor and associate editor of the News were present as invited guests, both being members of the Chamber of Commerce.  After a discussion of the question i,t was decided that the managerial form was worth considering, but the opinion was expressed that all interests were friendly to the present city officials and it was determined to have a committee con-  war time control over fuel provid- J suit them about the matter before ed for in the food control act. proceeding further.  While actively serving as adminis  trator, Dr. Garfield was instrument-  In consequence whereof, J. E. Hickman, F. L. Finley and Marvin  al in ’ bringing about the so-called Brown, as members of the Chamber Washington wage agreement which Commerce, were app . exDires Anril I 1920 and which  wai *  on the cit V commissioners in a rSS been extended would be body «d ascertain their opinion as  violated if the miners walk out.    —--  All Belgium Goes Back to Work and Now Recovering  MAXY CASES REPORTED  AGAINST ARKASAS BLACKS  By ♦ hy    u'.itl  HELENA, Ark., Oct. 29.—With 21 indictments charging murder already returned more than IOO cases  remained to be investigated when    ______  the grand jury which convened  Monday it resumed its investigation By a •» -    *• t Pre-  today of the recent negro uprising BRUSSELS, Oct. 28.—All Bel-in Elaine in the southern part of glum is returning to work and the Phillips county. Most of those country is recovering rapidly from against who indictments were re- the war.    '  turned are negroes. Additional in- In Brussels factories which were dictments were expected late today, damaged during the German occu-'  Trials of the alleged participants pation are being fitted with ma-j    ^  in the disorder in which five white chinery, and some of them already  y  men were killed are expected to are turning out their accustomed begin next week.  Germany Sees Crime Increase With War Close  to whether or not they thought it wise to investigate the managerial form.  It might be well to mention the fact that in the meeting the present  FATHER, TWO SOXS AXD TWO DAUGHTERS .MAKE A IMI PICKING COTTON.  Sjiecial Service AUBREY. Tex, Oct. 28.  UNIVERSAL SUFFRAGE NOW BEFORE JAPANESE     --- ----- ---------,    as they are called. They are to have  products to within a few    per cent; A- Muller    and family, wage wotkeis.     a  purely military interior    organiza-  of the pre-war capacity    ! expect to    put at least $7000    in the    tj 0 n, cloaked    outwardly,    however,  Production of sugar exceeds the b. ilk bt fore Christmas £8 a    result    as police and    intrusted    only with  pre-war tonnage. Glass    factories  0 f work    done for Denton    county    police powers  GRAND DUCHESS WILL  ... BE MARRIED NOV. BTH  ^    city administration was spoken of  LUXEMBOURG, Tuesday, Oct. 28 * the  highest^ terms, especially as —Grand Duchess Shillott of Luxem-  concerns  the mayor, and it was sug-bourg and Prince Felix of Bourbon->  gested  that the committee make it Tarma will be married here Novena-  plain that in the event it was de -  ber 6, by Bishop Micotra.    ;     c i ded  to try for the managerial form  Prince Felix was born at Schwar-     that it    not be done until  the time  ; eau, Sept. 28, 1893.    Unlike his     0 f the    expiration of    the terms of  Hy the    Associated    Presa    brother, Sixtus and    Xavier, who    office of the various    commissioners  WITH    THE    AMERICANS IN GER- served in the French    army, be en-     now in     charge of the    affairs of the  MANY    i Bv    Mail.)—The German I    tered the Austrian service. Al-    city.   n  though he declared at the beginning on Tuesday, at the regular lunch-govermuT.t    is    using    £    - cs j    hostilities he would refuse to    eon and business meeting of    the  j tile increase of    crime    in Germany j     fight agains t the French, owing to    Lions Club of Ada, that very    pop-  since the end of the was as the ba prince Felix’s war service, there ular civic organization considered si* and the    excuse for    formation of:    was some hostility to his marriage    thoroughly the question of the    man-  spcnritv notice  1     to Grand Duchess Shillott, but the    agerial form for the city a*    the  Henry numerous     un  ^    ^    Hnvgi    latter declared that it was a love    first    convenient    opportunity,    and  match, and that she would marry    the    same    was    unanimously    en-  no other. People of Luxembourg    dorsed.  subsequently took this view of it. 1  Strengthened with this additional  __I support  are  reopening. In the iron and: farmers this year. Already their. The intentions of the government  NED CROSS QUOTAS ON  Mr. W. F. Brennan.  of the country and under all con  ny t?* Arsoci&Ted Pr*s*    ______ _      _    TORIO, Oct. 28.—Japanese new  ditions gives him such a survey of paper men recently returned from will be operating to capacity the business world that he is in I position to be of inestimable value bus to the average retail merchant or  a   business man.    "Reconstruction Alliance," with the daily. During  Mr. Yunkers s'a’ed at the News object of carrying out radical re- tj on a n copper fittings were remov-office yesterday, also, that the city forms in Japan in consonance with  ed  from the machines in the spin of Dayton was the pioneer In the the age. and especially with the ob-  n j ni r factories, and some of these managerial form of government and ject of having a universal suffrage  have not yet been  replaced.  steel mills many plants have resum- bank account is more than $4000 as voiced in the German newspapers, 1  ed operations, particularly in the and there is every indication that is to have these organizations as Liege districts where some of the* the family will make it $7000 be- instruments of the police chiefs or mills were completely demolished -ore Santa Claus comes.    the various cities without any con  and others so badly damaged that At present the family, consisting nection with the military author!-•■ii ti re blast furnaces had to be re- of Muller, two sons and iwo daugh- ties. It appears, however that thew built. Within a year, it is believed, ters. is picking cotton at $4 Per IOO. units are to be A®*™*JIn  ba " aca ! s- the most iniDoriant of these plants Muller picks 250 pounds daily, each in order to be a\ailable in case of  •if the boys gathers 500 pounds, one any concerted trouble. Companies!  Rv Kpws' S'M'io! Service  the committee aforesaid, from the Chamber of Commerce, on Monday afternoon visited the mayor’s office and attempted to meet  1  the commissioners as instructed. Mr. Jones, commissioner of finance, was reported to be in Oklahoma City . and the whereabouts of Mr. Deal, commissioner of public works and j safety, was to the mayor at that time unknown.  The committee notified the mayor call the following the afternoon, at mayor said all would good reason that  mo™ Tha*\rttffd meaT*4560 h f« according t^Vepons^reacW^Amtrt: close December 31 will he sent on a it was the regular date for a stated •otton picking. But it is not all clears can headquarters, to be well trained  profit. The Mullers must live. They bodies of men to be incorporated "board” themselves, for the Denton into the National army at a mo-  The linen industry also has tak- county farmers pay but $3 per IOO J ment’s notice.  population basis, according to H A.    meeting of    the    council. He    also  Lane, seal sales director. In the    promised to    notify the other    two  past quotas have been set on a    commissioners of    the wishes of the  basis of the amount a community    committee.  On the first visit of the con Blit  he added that it had most certainly law' passed at the next session of  been a success in the city of Day- the Diet.     en on new life§ and  additional  ton.    *    The program also includes abo-     are     being    employed every  He further stated that his com- lition of all class distinctions, abo-  week    eX p or t    trade in linen  ssr£,“s/“ S'vc. xrs    "Um    “sir    si'ssu-r-s?™!?    mute    s,ssis    ”5    "iifoo"    “".Vt    Ps  .bl,! .M«h, h„. .... ,u..tion    system.    -I    ti,    »|.t    "!,“«»■ ” w, t. ^ w lls. !mT pK« .Stn    Figures    "tunis,    lo    the            —    """«    ">    '»•  ^  Ior thf , o^oDie TO secure me press    \trotn    Brussels    to    the    sea    scarcely, rainily made more than $3000 in many in the period from January I  SK with tblfuhnfrwled* dcscrip    S-| : 'SiftSTJE? £ ER 2%  police cannot be so expanded as to  ready for planting. Next spring they  titve matter that went with It. Japan aa compared with other lead-j they are working from early morn I *|J®  bo ^* .^ 1 * n W ° r J, n °"  f ianda We publish in this connection a, mg countries.    until    late    at    night    to    attain «>at ^“tl»8 M n g Next .prf n g^hey  photograph of Mr. Brennan, the! The suffrage resolution, adopted end.     f »T    J^ sprtng tney  man who is to deliver the lecture unanimously, was supported by) Apparently there Is no scarcity ofL ( ^ tt     ®    fJlJT    " c hoD    cot-  •otton and corn and later “chop cotton." Muller declares he and the  more than twice aa large_as was    “;“ l  ^"‘people' and'“state'd   e ^ eT     ?    Coir    rein nf     that    al1 he wanted in    fhe  matter of  ed with    the usual    fair    margin of     cRy     government was    the best that  safety. This    is the plan decided    on. j  cou j d    be    bad     f or the    m0 ney.  It will begin with the county    and     Re    R    gaid    to tbe    cred it  0 f    the  will be followed down through the  ma y 0r  himself, he has never been city organizations Thus if a city known to snub a committee appoint-.    ..  Um ., Uw     hag a population of 50,000, Its QHO- ied b y the citizenship or by any  handle the situation    ta will be set at $2,500.     c f    the    civic organizations whose  I p to thu time    Breslau    has     ha <J The county and    city    populations    objects are supposed    to be for Xhe  JaIa    VU? Z n nt    v    will  be     determined in    the near    best    interests of the    city.  ti    i    i    h    rn    in    I    minintrJ     future an d     the  O uota toT 6110,1    an *i    On    yesterday the conKnittee    met  authorized    by    the    local    ministry.!     nounce d.    Organizations of    the  here on the date aforementioned, !  three of the younger members of food in Belgium. It Is costly In  and    it is    urged    that    every business    the Die who were present. One    of    towns and cities, but    In the conn-:.    ...     b »    .  ma k P  aufflcieni  man    in the    city    remember the    date,    th« m, Representative Uyehara, said: I    try the people    have now g a thered!     nu ** ‘     defrav    lh|1 fnml i v  nv m . nsei     \merican officers    say this increase!‘ twu “ vw *    —----  NOV 7 and make It a Point to be    •Japan    . cnna.it:a.ional eonnf,t 1   lh6 , r flrs , harve,t ainee the w*r.! “ ^^^ieV ^nd spMng^ laTn vfolaUon of anTcle iez of^ auntie* are progrenalng rapidly,  present on this occasion.    |Jn    bu    ^    not    and are in need of nothing. Even  put a few hun dre d  away .The MuUer peace treaty, which provides that  people  r /^e  thal  ^ hl    nf,     butter la  h®* 11 *    ■ anred    ia the botela »;    girls    do    not do    any farm work In!    the increase in the number of gen-   i  Delongs to them there can be    »»     and  in every    house    there is no     tbe w j n ter or spring, although they j    darmes, employes    or officials of the  *    -    *    police    will    bs    a1-  INTERNAL REVENUE I AGENTS ARE NOW BUSY  and great interest In the sale is being evidenced in all parts of the state. Lane and Miss Helen M. Hall, his assistant are spending i  (Continued on Page 5.)  |«u.h ihlng a. a irue consU.u.ional ,  |onRer tear of  starvation which J d™la7“ they find it difficult to re-! local or municipal  .....  -    _    ___    _  idovoMne Th»m*f»ivla er i ricui ri  ,or  *°  miiny ypan '  made ,,fe a bur " I uhs $3 per day to chop cotton. (lowed only in proportion to the in-| their time making trip# through tho devoting tnemselv«w to foetal r<-  den _  Man  -argons  are  convinced;      I    crease    of    populall    ------  i forms, Japan has still to settle the 'V ‘‘,    -    *•--:  question of universal suffrage which; ,hat  “ te tlme  " ex ‘ ,v« l  ‘,®! it her countries disposed of long  country very wcl1 on th «  way ,0   I ago.’  recovery.  By the AnoaaUd Pm*  WASHINGTON. Ort 29.  Armed  MITHKK4JON BOAT IMSAKTKIt    w^lnSSn    Ham   1     ItK-Srt.TS |5i 21 DKATHW ,    MAKE,    WOVDERKUl. HAUL  _    !    By the Aaaocmtiwl  with the drastic provisions of  lhe  By the Adiated pr.ee    I    rock ISLAND, IIL, Oct.    29.—  prohibition enforcement act which, MUSKEGON Micb    Oct 29_I Blowing the door off of the    safety  became effective as to war-time pro- ^    " Demon, were officially     vaa, t    * nd  breaking the indi-  hibilion with the passing by_ the sen-,  acrounled for ear|y today an<1 four .|vidual boxea open with a hammer  VI.?! “I W6ro known  to have lost their   d f n ?    Reve^L7 d nLs^nF     llvo « the sinking yesterday of  of the Internal R nue    ^ the Coast Line Steamer, City of  today took up he ia i ac ure aud. Muskegon, which was driven Into  V ronisinln* ealMtv. I     the  ^ ler 4il a     Bslbimle  »v ^    .    ning a oons in t^Jj Coast Line officials stated that they  United State* were legally  #     believed ail the missing ones have  today only for the sale of liquor p er j a hed  containing one half of one per cent    _____  alcohol. Sales as well as manufac-  and othe’’ tools stolen from a nearby blacksmith shop,    robbers  some time during the early morning today made a haul of $35,000 in Liberty bonds belonging to IOO depositors of the state bank of Sherrard. IU., near here.  POLICE OFFICIALS AFTER BOMB PLOTTERS  _______population    since    1913    In, state developing a strong, central-  the districts in which they are em-! l*ed and efficient machine which ployed.    j    cannot help but- succeed in this, the  greatest humanitarian drive ever promulgated for the health of a nation as a whole  THE MINE WORKERS STRIKE EFFECTIVE  SALOONS OFFICIALLY CLOSE IN MILWAUKEE TODAY SAYS  A Chicago man has given up a  r u VTrt be«7ag;;  o rio~ th^-^tl a**™* HAVE APVAWOKP j $10,900 portly* T*h » UfrJW* amount will lay the saloon keeper ADMIRAL KOLCHAK CREDIT, ance company ^to become  a  a* well as the brewer liable to heavy j Br     ^ I ub M Oll tlBMjfe  penalties    LONDON,    Oct.    19.—A wireless “doesn’t he Just sell bls life ln-  Despite its other drastic provisions message from Moscow says that A surance and fire Insurance both the lew wee not leveled st the per-j*roep international bankers bas!from the tame office?”  son who bad stored up a supply In advanced Admiral Kolchak A cred-! : ~—  bl* own home for his own use. j it of $50,000,000.    j    Let A Want Ad get It for XDU.  By th* Associated Presa  CLEVELAND. O., Oct. 29.—Police officials continue today to question the five men and one woman under arrest in connection with an alleged plot to place bombs at many places throughout the country next spring. Believing the six are members of an anarchistic circle that  has been working in more than IOO    .    .    ...    .  cities, the police questioned the    Young    men who nave  group all night In an effort to learn    Job, and    equally good looking    girls  detail, of their plan, or the extent!    had better hang onto both,    for thoro  By the Associated Presa  MILWAUKEE, WIA, Oct. 29.— For the first time In history, Milwaukee has gone dry today. All saloon keepers have abandoned the sale of all alcoholic drinks at midnight last night After 12 o’dockk saloons reported the greatest business ever known to them. Most of the bars in the central section of the city were filled with patrons for many hours.  INDIANAPOLIS, Ind., Oct. 29.— The strike order of United Mine ! Workers which went into effect I Friday at midnight will stand. Af-1 ter two hours discussion, the con-  High School Notes.  _    _ . . J Z I »j n  ww._ H ! ference of officials of the big union  The Cadet Band of the    J? here today announced that they bad  School will make Its first public ap-, IF™**    ^  pea ranee in chapel Wednerfay after-! »o Idea of jnodUytag themUl tor  of their organisation.  The arrests were made in four simultaneous raids following information that an attempt was to be made to bomb the central police station bere.  are plenty of other young fellows not so well off who will not heelr tate to step in and take them.  Pants cleaned And pressed 50 eta. Miller Bros.    .    10-22-9ti  cramp of Mr.    A. L. Fentem. the,    ^cement on    the threatened In-  band has made    wonderful progress.;    dustrial situation did    not have    a  having put in    much hard work at    sln«le defendant    In the    conference    It  practice. They    will lead In the,    was stated.  "America,’ and “The Star-  sonars  MEET  Spangled Banner” Wednesday after- LABOR LEADERS AYD  noon .    I    CAPITALISTS    TO  ______ ;    dy th* Associated Pres*  Paul Althouse Is to appear at the| WASHINGTON, Oct 29.—Labor Normal auditorium Wednesday, Not.(leaders and capitalists will partld-5. He comes under the auspices of i pate unofficially in the Intemation-the High School and tickets may :  a1 Labor Conference which began its be had from any member of the; session here today, and Secretary  Chorus Club.  Let a Want Ad sell It for yea  Wilson of the labor department who called the conference to order will remain president.   

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