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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - October 29, 1919, Ada, Oklahoma                             Coming Thursday The Greatest of All Emotional Screen Stars "Nazimova" in War Brides___American Theatre Thursday and Friday. THREE CENTS THE COPY ADA, OKLAHOMA, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 29, 1919 VOLUME XVI. NUMBER 196 What's All This Commotion About? SEKMHD IX SIGHT TODAY Mr C -V Yunkers. of The Nation- al" Cash' Hotter Co.. of nayton. Ohio, was in the city yesterda> and made arrangements to have de- livered in the city on the evening ot Nov. T a lecture by W. E. Rrennen of tho same company and thy department, a "pop" lecture for mer- chants and business men. The lecture will be in the audi- ditorium of the Knst Central State Normal and will be free to every business man In the city. Mr. Bron-1 nan is familiar with every problem of the retail mercant. and while it might appear that the lecture would necessarily be for the benefit of the; National Cash Register Co.. it might be well to state that this concern is> so big and has reached such gi-1 gantic proportions that its scheme of operations takes into account, many activities which are good the local business man that are ab- solutely free from all appearances' of commercialism. The lecture will be illustrated with a stereoptlcan and all mer- chants, dorks and tho wives of nior- if_........___ Oct. end of the senate battle ovor the forty-sixth amendments written into the "peace treaty by the foreign re- lations committee seemed in sight today, the leaders hoping that a the last of the group could be taken today or tomorrow. The amendment was presented by Sen- ator Moses, Republican of New Hampshire, and would exclude all of tho British Dominions from vot- ing in any league of nations con- troversy to which one of them was a party. A subject which was not touch- ed upon by the foreign relations committee was injected into tho fight today by Senator Gore, Demo- crat of Oklahoma, who presented an ameudmer- to Article 12, propos- ing that under the league no nation would BO to war "until an advisory vote of the people shall have been taken." as an additional condition after arbitration had failed. The debate centered during much of the discussion around the treaty men are oonCoyiioJ. and his vast ex-, perience of many yiv.r? in al! parts this provision are to be made by, several senators. I ASSERTS THAT HE IS IN CLOSE BUKDBNs" OF JOKES TOUCH WITH THE MINERS MUCH TO AND SSHaD About the middle of last week tho Associated Press officers and members of the WASHINGTON, Oct. I of Commerce met in lunch- Fuel Administrator Harry A. Gar-i lhg Harris Hote] to consider field, discussed the threatened' queslion of whether or not the strike ol bituminous miners would undertake to investigate with Secretary Tumulty at the! thg question of managerial form of with secretary Muumny tne question of managerial White House. He was summoned i govcnlraent, looking to the advisa- hero from Williams College, of blut inaugurating a campaign which he is president. U1111.T for -Ihe same if the city of Ada aicn ne yieoiucMi.. jor -.me same u Dr. Garfield who still has author-j advisable to do so. ity to function as fuel adminlstra-, At that meeting the editor and tor asserted that he was in close j assOciate editor of the News were touch with the strike situation and: present as invited guests, both oe- expressed confidence that a settle- ing members of the Chamber or ment would be reached without a I walkout of the miners. The fuel administrator would not discuss his conference with Mr. Tumulty, but his visit to the White House revived suggestions that the fuel administration might again be Commerce. 'After a discussion of the question it was decided that the managerial form was worth considering, but the opinion was expressed that all interests were friendly to the pres- ent city officials and it was de- con- All Belgium Goes 'MAXY CASES REPORTED AHKASAS BLACKS, Work 1-1KLKXA, Ark.. Oct. 21 indictments charging murder al-; ready returned more than 100 cases' remained to be investigated when; the grand Jury which convened; Monrtav it resumed its investigation By n..- n-.- iodav of tho recent negro uprising: BRUSSELS. Oct. Bel- in Elaine in the southern part of' giinn is returning to work and the Phillips county. Most of those country is re 'oring rapidly trom a-ainst who indictments were re- the war. turned are negroes. Additional in-. In Brussels factories which were i dlctments were expected late today.. damaged during the German occu-j Trials of the alleged participants. pation are being fated with ma- in the disorder in which five white' chinery. and some of them already men were killed are expected to' are turning out their accustomed I products to within a few per cent i of the pre-war capacity Production of sugar exceeds the. pre-war tonnage. Glass factories i are reopening. In the iron and j steel -mills many plants have resum-l ed operations, particularly in the j districts where some of the. Germany Sees Crime Increase War trator. Dr. Garfield was Instrument- al in bringing about the so-called Washington wage agreement which expires April 1. 1920 and it has been contended would violated if the miners walk out. SONS MAK.B piriUNt; COTTON. begin next week. Mr. AV. K. Bronnan. AVIiKEY. Tex.. Oct. j A. Mulior and family, wage ,-xpoc; to put at in the I tii-l'ore Christmas u. result n! work done Tor Donton county I farmers this year. Already ihelrj banlt ax-count is more than ?4000 ;ind there is every indication that! tho family will make it be- fore Saniiv Glaus i-omcs. I ._.-_ a'survey of the business world that he is in- position to bo of inestimable value to the average retail merchant or; business man. Mr. Yunkers stated at tho News office yesterday, also, that the city of Dayton was the pioneer in the managerial form of government and he added that it had most certainly; been a success in the chy of Day-, ton. He further stated that his com-, pany had an illustrated picture film showing the many advantages of the managerial form which they would1 furnish any city free of charges which might have that question un-, der consideration. He suited that all! that was necessary to do to get It' was for the people to secure the, good offices of a picture theatre which would agree to run it, to gethor with the illustrated descrip titve matter that went with It. We publish in this connection a! photograph of Mr. Brennan. the man who is to deliver the lecture) here on the date and it is urged that every business1 man In the city remember the date, I Nov. 7, and make it a point to be present on this occasion. entire blast furnaces had to be re-. built. Within a year, it is -lap-mcso news- the most important ot these plants, paper men n-cenYly 'returned from will be operating to capacity. A I. politicians, labor leaders and I The cotton trade of Ghent also, 0 men have Just organized i has resumed, and steamers oaded -..form known thojwith American cotton are anhing. "KeconM ruction Alliance." with the-daily. During the German occupa-; object of currying out radical re- tion all copper fittings were remov-, forms in Japan in consonance with c-d from the machines In the spin toriils in japan in eu iruui LUO the ago. nnd especially with the ob-j factories, and some of these ject of having a universal suffrage have not yet been replaced. i law passed at the next session of- uncn industry also has tak-, the Diet. i on on new life, and additional j The program also includes workers are being employed every: lition of all class distinctions, abo-j weck_ exp0rt trade in linen, lition of bureaucratic diplomacy. just as rapidly as the tablishraent of a democratic political faclorles can turn out the finished system, public recognition of laborl duc, It is in the country dis- organizations, reform ot the tax however, where one sees system, "purification" of the Imperl :BelRlan at his best. In the. ial household department, and country which stretches solute freedom of speech and of Brussels to the sea scarcely ffSS-wSrASi ssf.-ss The suffrage resolution, adopted end. unanimously, was by three of the younger members of the Die who were present. One of them. Representative Uychara, said: Apparently there Is no scarcity ofj food in Belgium. It Is costly in towns and cities, but In the coun- try the people have now gathered mm ARE now etn Kepreseniaiive uiu ycvym "Japan is a constitutional countryl their first harvest since the war, in namo but not In reality. Until i and al.e in need of nothing. Even' the people realize that the country i butter Is "being served in the belongs to them there can be no! and in every house there Is no; such thing as a true constitutional I longcr the fear of starvation which country. While other nations are. so many years made life a bur- devoting themselves to social re-1 ,jei, Many persons are convinced ters Is picking cotton at Per 100- Muller picks 250 pounds daily, each j of the boys gathers 500 pounds, one of the girls 3PO ;md the other never fpiu below 350 pounds. This makes 1900 pounds dally or Cor thei day's work. Muller expects to pick- iMii'ton for at least GO days, perhaps That Wbiffd mean for --oilon But it is not all clear: lirofit. The Mullers must live. They; themselves, for the Demon county farmers pay but por 100 "and board." Mrs. Muller does the looking. The farmers furnish the houses to live in. Muller declares he. feeds arid clothes the family of] six on per month while in the; fields, which means that he and his family will "salt down" dur-: ing the cotton picking season. During the summer the Muller family made more than Dento'n county during the harvest, culling, shocking, threshing and sacking wheat. This winter Muller plan to work on farms grains or getting lands planting. Next spring they, aid the farmer In planting! cotton and corn and later "chop cot-1 ton." Muller declares he and the boys will be able to make sufficient, money to defray the family expense during the winter and spring and put a fr.w hundred away. The Muller girls do not do any farm work In the winter or spring, although they; declare they find It difficult to re-1 fuse per day to chop cotton. alinl Press IK AMERICANS IX GEIl-j MANY, illy German j is tiding statistics on', rhe increase of crime in Germany j  f international -bankers has A Chicago man has given up a position with. a., lite. insur-, ance company to become.. ft preach- er, "feut aaitfl fin old timer, "doesn't he just sell his life In- surance and fire insurance both from the lly tho Awoclatcd CLEVELAND. 0., Oct. lice officials continue today to Ques- tion the five men and one woman undfir arrest In connection with an alleged plot to place bombs at many places throughout the country next spring. Believing the six are mem- bers of an anarchistic. circle that ha.s been working hi more than 100 cities, the Police questioned the group all night in an effort't.o learn ''details of their1 Plans or the extent of their organization. The arrests "were made in four simultaneous Talds following Infor- mation that an attempt was to oe made to bomb the central police i station here. Uy Lho AnHocialcil Pi-can MILWAUKEE, Wis., Oct. For the first time In history. MU- waukee has gone dry today. All sa- loon keepers have abandoned the sale of all alcoholic drinks at mid- night last night. After 12 o'clockk saloons reported the greatest busi- ness ever known to them. Most of the bars in the central section of the city were filled with patrons for many hours. INDIANAPOLIS, Ind.. Oct. 29.- Young men -who have Jobs and equally good looking girla had better hang onto both, for there are plenty of other young fellows not BO well off who will not hesV- tate to step in and take them. M and Hiph School Notes. The Cadet Band of the Ada High' School will make its first public ap-i pearance In chapel Wednesday after-l noon Under the direction and lead- ership of Mr. A. L. Fentem, the, band has made wonderful progress.: having put in much hard work at practice. They will lead in the: "America.' and "The Star-; Spangled Banner" Wednesday after- noon. I Paul Althouse la to appear at the. Normal auditorium Wednesday, NOT.I 5. He comes under tho auspices of, the High School and tickets may be had from any member of the; Chorus Club. Let a Want Ad sell It for you. Workers which went into effect Friday at midnight will stand. Af- ter two hours discussion, the con- ference of officials of the big union here today announced that they had no idea of modifying the call for a strike. President Wilson's pro- nouncement on the threatened In- dustrial situation did not have single defendant in the conference it was stated. LABOR LEADERS AND ____ CAPITALISTS TO MEET dy tho Amoclntcd Frew WASHINGTON. Oct. 29.- leaders and capitalists will pate unofficially In the Internation- al Labor Conference which began Its session here today, and Secretary of the labor department who called the conference to order remain president.   

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