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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: October 13, 1919 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - October 13, 1919, Ada, Oklahoma                             People Desiring Real Entertainment, the Best to Be Had, We Suggest "Bill Apperson's Boy" from the Story "That ba Cfcenmet BIG RETURN! VOLUME XVI. NUMBER 182 ADA, OKLAHOMA, MONDAY, OCTOBER 13, 1919 THREE CENTS THE COPY run WHEN WEAVER SCORED FROM SECOND IN CHICAGO'S BIG GAME TAKKS JAI'ASKSK IX VX1 V TO TASK BMNC: I'.MH'I.Y srsPHUHS' OK WKKK5X visiTons. It.v the I'sws TOK1O. Sept, i. (Correspondence of The Associated rress. i -Kefer- ring to the sensitiveness of the Japanese authorities about the move- ment of "suspicious foreigners'" who arrive in thrs country, tin1 ,liji says that no doubt the authorities are wisely careful to prevent (he influx of such dangerous ideas as Bolshe- vism and socialism, but the result i.- that foreigners who are very fa- vorably inclined toward Japan are not infrequently subjected lo a sys- tem of vexations spying or shadow- ins. The Jiji relates that recently an American whose name is well known in business and economic circles in AuiT-tica, on his way from Nagasaki to Tokio, is said to have been subjected to examination at the hands of half a dozen differ- ent detectitves. The American, who is a friend of Huron Shibusawa. in the course of an interview with him. drew his attention io what had occurred during his journey. ;uid said :ha: such ail experience, if sintered fiv other foreigners, is likely to send :he'u awa> with a verv nnf.ivoi .iMe :tnpre.-sion of Japan. Thi- Jiji also refers to tlu- case of Krederick Stan-, at the Chicago who i- well known the Japanese bv the ham." of Otnda or Doctor. ow.ii- !o "he interest evinced by in the of tVO.U Ihe .lal'.lIU St- The American professor reeentiv a- rived in Japan. As soon ,K Pr. St vi landed Vokoh.iina tile ioca! police authorities instructed ;i police offi- cer to follow 10 Tokio. Later, when Or. left tor a trip to Mount Fuji. the police aui honiie.i supplied, unasked, a police escort to the American visitors, and the officer accompanied him all the way TO the top of the mountain. is at present staying al Koxti and his residence, says the newspaper, is unnecessarily closely watched by the lynx-eyed police. The Jiji adds: "It is the h.-inlit of absurdity that the Japanese authori- ties should evince suspicion about the movements of such men and detail detevtivr> to watch over them." As soon as the plan was announced whereby the various counties of the state, through the highway depart- ment at Oklahoma City, could se- cure almost without cost bin army trucks for road building. O. N. secretary of the Chamber of Commerce, got busy to see what could be done for 1'onlotoc- county. At the same time county commis- :sioners W. 11. Brumley. J. 1. l.augh- lin and H, K. Bibb also got active and as a result this county has come into possession of two of these large j trucks-with the promise of two more in the near future. Secretary Walker and CommUsiou- ers Brumley and Langhlin went to .Oklahoma City the latter pan of last 1 week and put the deal over, securing two trucks which are worth four thousand dollors each for the beg- garly sum of four hundred dollas each. The price paid only represents the transportation costs from the factors here, and it is doubtful if the county ever drove a better bargain than this, in fact, ii is safe to say that i: never did and probably never will auain. unless n some more of these trucks. These trucks are designed im1 ui.lv tor transportation bill will draw scraper.-, traders and plov the trucks is capable, it i Com intied on I 'a no In .-'Mb inning of ihe sixth WML! for a tlr-itble vvh-ii Kopf air: world v.i..... Weaver, the JMlncan played an Alhpouse-Uiis- t'irsi t'tiiii !'o- tl'.e Whiti- Sox. .lael; -on iheii singled lo poppi il a leaguer that in.-; ;.n.-i V.Vaver lioaie him base. I'ho'o third. White 1HEGUEZ SAYS FEDER- AL FORCES NOW HAVE RKBKL IN TRAP; FATD DUE SOON. HKKJtKSHKD BY SUNDAY UKST, 2O OF THE OKIGJNAL STAKT- KRS ttKSUilK FIJtiHT T O I) A Y JUAREZ, Oct. January 1, Uie Villa movement in Chi- huahua will be entirely crushed and its leader will cease to be a factor in Mexican politics. Gen. M. Dies- uez, Mexican federal commander of military operations in the nothern declared after he had read a statement that a major offensive would bo begun against Villa. "Villa is now at San Bartelo, with a force of eighty men, which represents his entire military forces" said General Dieguez, who is here I'o'r an inspection tour along the border. are now making a movement by which the enemy will be caught between two units of my one moving south, 2000 strong un- der General Miguel Laveaga and one moving north strong. have waited till today before to Juarez with the good news of Villa's impending over- KOKKK.'N FOli TKADK P.v NKW YOUK. Oct. The inter- allied commission to 'the internation- al trade conference, consisting of delegates from Civat Britain. France. Italy and liolgiutn. arrived yesterday on ihe transport Ndrlhern Pacific !o represent their respect- ive countries ai Die conference which' is to in Atlantic   IVi- Ohio, Oct. 13.-- -.Strik- ing steel workers began to return to work in the mills here by the hundreds this morning. About IMIO in all went 10 work, company officials said. TOMATOES REAlll ARE VEGETABLES-IT'S P.V I In- 1'lV.S KANSAS CITY, .Mo.. Oct. 111. A aimlc of Ihe old queision of x'theiht'r .1 !omato is a frnii a vegetable came up in police court here and brought a stay of execution of a tine imposed on a lural grocer. The grocer charged sell- ing toniatOi's which had been dis pla.Veil in uncovered showcases in front of his store. His attorneys cited the ordinance providing ilia; no fruits which will be eaten without being washed may exposed for sale, but that vegetables which are washed and cooked may fie displayed in unprotected boxes. "Tomatoes are the groci-r maintained, these were for "I'll fine you because 1 you are i-'uilty.1 said the "but I'll grant you a of execution because you have a good argu- ment." Attorney General For Municipally Owned Ice Plants ATCI1ISON. Kan., Ocl. 1 ;i. A message from Attorney General Kichard .1. Hopkins, read before the convent ion of the League of Kan- sas Municipalities here, urged that the league "continue its fight" in favor "I muuieipalh owned ice plants. He said: "In my opinion, the mere enacl- meni of a law by the state legisla- ture giving cities of Kansas the right to construct and operate mu- nicipal ice plants will eliminate all ice famines in Kansas and the cost Of ice and would prevent untold suf- fering among the poor who are un- able to buy ice at high rates." Tho attorney general also urged that public sentiment assert itself against any unjust gas rates. "The attempt of the gas barons to raise rates and place the burden of supporting such rates on the small consumer ought to be resent- ed in such strong terms that the men attempting to put over such n deal would realize the perfidy of their action." said Ihe Hopkins mes- sage. scored three runs in this in--throw, for I do not like to make promises that I cannot fulfill. The d of the year will see Villa a tyinu' Phone Company Won't Arbitrate Declares Noble 1 en By tlio Prfss MINEOLA. N. Y.. Ocl. freshed by an enforced over Sunday rest, twenty of the forty-two original starters in the transcontinental air race lined up at controls all the wny from Mineokt to San Francisco 1.0 take up the trail completed Satur- day by Lieut. B. W. Maynard. Major Carl Spatz and Ueut. E. C. Keil, the three race leaders. Four leaders who began at San Francisco started the day today ith good prospects of reaching by night while five of the westbound fliers were within a day's flight or San Francisco. Those expected at Mineola during the day were L'apt. L. H. Smith, who spent Sunday at Rochester, N. Y.; Lieut. H. S. thingion, who held over at Cleve- land; Lieut. JT. E. Queens at Bryan. Ohio; and Major J. C. Bartholz at Chicago. Major Spatz and Lieut. Kiel who landed here Saturday Col. House Home from Europe a Very Sick Man CA1 RATIFY FROM ATLANTA Captain 'Sam II. Harms arrived home las'i evening from the bf; re- union of Cunfedeiale Veterans held ip. Atlanta. On., last week. The delegates 10 the reunion from .Wlllilam L. By I'd Camp wore Capt. Hargis, J. A. Morgan. J. C. Cafes and Mrs. s. A. Tlpton. all of whom attended the reunion. Mr. Gates had, been visiting near ChutttuiooKti for1 some time to the reunion- from that point- his cn-denttials hiiv-, ing been sent him I'rom this camp! several days Norn- of the other, delegates from this camp have ye: returned. Capt. Hargis states that ihere were ten thousand veterans in at-- tendance at the reunion, .that'the city furnished ample accomodations; and that everyone present had a good lime. Capt Harris slates that Senator. Luther Harrison's speech was tho feature of the occasion and that1 when he had finished his address1 i he entire audience rose to their fi.-et and gave three cheers for Okla-: homa. A resolution was also passed or-. di-i-ing Senator Harrison's speech printed and a. copy mulled to every veteran attending the reunion. YORK. Ocl. Col. Kd- ward M. House, chief adviser to President Wilson and representa- tive 'of ihe president in Paris for several months, returned from Eu- rope y-sterday on the transport I'acific, a very sick man. "This is the first day I have been .without fever since I sailed." lie said when yskcil about tho condition of his health, "Its not influenza. Its my I old trouble-gravel. I want to get! back to my home here and got a rest, I hope to be able to 80 on to Washington In a week or. To a (iiipstiou regarding tho stat- us of Ihe league of nations Colonel House said: t "There is notliing to be said on that subject. Everything that, could be said in that connection has been, said. The thing to be done now is! WASHINGTON, Oct. tor Gore, in a telegram today to Mrs. Frank Mask ell of Tulsa and other Oklahoma suffrage leaders, suggested that if Governor Robert- son does not. call a special session of the legislature io ratify Hie suf- frage amendments. It can be ratified by iniliiitive at ihe election on Aug- ust PJ20. Senator Gore recently received a telegram from Oklahoma suffrage leaders saying that several attempts to see Governor Roberlson in re- gard lo ihe special session hml fail- ed. Scnalor Ooru said that he based his opinion that flm amendment could be ratified by initiative on a recent decision of the supreme court of the slate of Washington. He said any state having the initiative could ratify the amendment even if tho legislature failed to do so. Tht- loe.il (if 111-' American l.v. ;on will meet at the Oily Hall a iMuill o'clock this .'veiling, and tiiei-i- i" much, business 01 im- portance to In attended to. ih- olfi- i-ers unxnuis llKi: i-vry i- be present. 'i'he local iir'-anix.ai is coming aloi'u' in fine style, and all that Is to make this ono of the moM active pus'" slate .s for evt-ry rettirnf-d soldier to into the urgaliizalion and show tile same for the movt-incnt as is being Minw-n by the local officers. Ada Playhouses At tin- Liberty. "The Wrong Mr. a doub-, le black face comedy featurini; (lerui Cobb, the original Honey Gal. In this play Mr. Wright is taken for his twin brother, causing many tunny situations. But if we tell you any more you may not enjoy the show. So dou't fail to see it at the l.ili.-rty today. A) the Aniericii.li. Today is the "Croat Gamble." featuring Ann Murdoch. Charles Hutchinson and Harold l.io.vd. in one of his best comedies. .Money." also that comedy, "Happy tho Mar- t'oming Tuesday. "Alice Tell" in "The Trap." from ihe story by Richard Harding Davis. Thursday and Friday, .lack 1'icU- ford in "Hill Anderson's a story of tlie hill of Kentucky- within 20 t.hinn of the past." seconds of each other, afir-r a. nip General Dieguez who six years! and tuck race across i fir- cooiinent. was a common laborer in aiin Major Spatz is unolT.eiul- Sonora mine has jurisdiction overly reported to have won the il'o constitutionalists in the stare i remarkably narrow margin 01 31 of Chihuahua, Durango. "'orklnp on their and par. of Coahnila. turn trip within the ninety-six hours' j maximum time allowed by tin.- air I service between arrival at a terminus 'Control and departiiiv on ihe re-turn .flight. lty Asxn.-iuH'd Pi-pss M1NEOLA. N. Y.. Oct. L. H.. Smith, third east bound avi- aior to complete- the Iran scon tin'ent- al flighl. arrived here at this OKLAHOMA CITY, Ocl. 11.-- Joh.i M. Noble, genera! manager of. UK- Southwestern Bell Telephone' company, testifying before the stale board of arbitration In the gation of the Drum right, telephone; ___ operators' strike, declared his com-' pany "will never listen to a third. lty llu. A.-soi-munl 1'ross party, not even the state board of INDEPENDENCE, Kans., Oc'. lo- morning. According to the record in arbitration" in the adjustment sintrle stroke. Judge J. Smith's log book he has beat- differences between the company I Holdren of'the Montgomery County! en Lieut. B. W. Maynard in the and its employes, it was stated yes-j district court dismissed from ;.uce, capt. Smith's figures show that terday by Claude Conally. labor' current docket twenty-two divorce1 gan Francisco to Min- ooiKinissioner, who returned from the suits. In emphatic language he 2-1 hours, oO miiviu-s and mtieting of the board. torly opposed the genor.il 4x !_o seconds. Capt. Smith's claim "This said Conally, "that i of granting divorces, and" incidental-, wil) nave lo be 0fflcjany vorifiied one of the biggest corporations in ly, arraigned such atlorueys as make before a decision is mad'e. the state, employing thousands of. a specialty out of augmenting _--------- people, says that this board, created "divorce mill' in the courts. (jy Auociaicu by law for the purpose of hearing "The war is over." ihe judge slated SACRAMENTO, Calif., Oct. differences between employe and em- in dismissing the suits, "and I C. H. Draytoo. westbound in Ployi-r, might just as well be off ihe Hie families of this ctAmty to stop. tl.anscontineiual air derby, ar- face of the earth." fighi.ing at home. If Jlie attorneys. fourteen mlles from this place, at this morn- ing. Nouli Con ley I'uy would co-openue with me in this' crusade against divorces so many .1 imii N'oah Conley was arrested by the homes would not go-to sma.su II city-auihoriti.-s on a charge Pnnci.als in dnorce cases drunkenness this morning paid a 'instead of '-f1- SALT LAKE CITY fine and costs amounting to u.oV --Lieut. Pearson lef The county commissioners and the di roc tors of the Chamber of Commerce enjoyed a luncheon at the Harris hotel today and took up the proposition of building a county court house and establish- ing the white way m Ada. vvouid.be a bettter chance for per- manent settlement when their pe- titions are refused." Prohibition or Control Question In Britain Now Utah. Oct. 13. left Battle Moun- tain for Reno. N'ev.. at. a. m. Lieut. J. O. Donaldson left. Battle Mountain at a. m. MICKIESAYS Hy ll.L1 Associated I'ITSS LONDON, Sept. .Much interest was manifested in ence of The Associated the court house question. After an (ttjn must choose between strict1 animated and enthusiastic discus- government control of the liquor in OONOU llio Associated Prcsu LINCOLN. Neb., Oct. plane No. KS, westbound in the trans continental race crashed to earth nine miles from Oconlo, Ne-b., according to a report received here at -noon today from the control station at North Platte. The plane was in charge of Lieut. H. D. Nor- ris, accompanied by Mechanic H. J. Meyer. Evidently neither of the men was seriously injured. MAKANDIMAIIFAIIFO II ATTEMPTED IlBf As the result of attempted ACmON AVKIIT TIK-W COAL TO MINhh Colonel House did not leave tho ship i'or several hours lifter her ar- rival. When seen In his stateroom ho was wearing a heavy overcoat with a thick blanket wrapped around him for additional warmth. It was suld he had been In bed throughout the voyage. Colonel House went lo Ptiris on October 2C, 1918, as special- envoy of the president and was the presi- dent's chief adviser during the ses- sions of the peace conference. He suffered a severe attack of influenza in Paris and was confined to his hotel for several weeks. Don't foreei wn' oil ;.tid gat vie. -dH .School of Instruction. All Masons are Mnvlted to at- tend the school of Instruction at the hall of Ada Lodge No. 119, F. A. M., at 8 o'clock this' evening, Miles C. Grlesby, W. M, official action, eilher by 1-Vosidoni Wilson or cabinet, to avert the threatened bituminous coal miners Nov. 1 is to be expected, it i was said today, at the White House. j Officials regard the matter as one requiring government action if oth- er efforts to avert a tie-up of the coal mines fail. Klrst BnpllNt Choir lU'hoiu-Hiil Tuesday night at will be the-' regular choir rehearsal at the First Baptist Church. A fine 'company of: our young people have very gra- clouslv volunteered to help In 'hu choir'and they, along with .all who i huve been coming, means we will' i have Ihe best cho'.r in of tho state. The meeting will begin promptly- at and last about forty-five minutes. Let everyone who will sion it was decided to appoint a committee to circulate petitions to. fame or absolute prohibition, secure the necessary number of sig- the opinion of Lord D'Abernon, natures, in order that. Uie corn-mis- chairman of the Liquor Control' sioners may call an election and the question to the people. (lliesiion is considered1 names of these committeemen broadl there are only two will probably be announced tomor- t t or said Lord-Hold-up last Friday night Mary row. D'Abcrnon. "Reversion to the old i Sparks Is in jail and Henry Sween- The matter of installing a white wal. C0lldltlons Would mean ey is -under bond for trial Henry way in the city was taken up and inefficiency, ill health. U Dutch 1 Teel is .rhe complaining the proposition was favored by all and the mlsery A commit toe composed of. resulted from drunken; According to the statement of the P. M. Shaw, ,L. A. Ellison, J. E. in'thc past- county attorney it. seems that Teel Hickman und' C. E. Cunning was lhllt controi js possible.' Wlls in an intoxicated condition in a iippolnled lo Interview the property Tjje experi6nce' Of the war shows i local restaurant and wanted a room holders along the street affected thaj. and efflciency can to go to bed. The Sparks woman of- by 'the move and get their consent hy regulation I believe! fered to conduct him to a room, and and co-operation in putting it over the. ls r trade is susc'eptible toi so she induced him to The proposed while way would roform Recent declaratlons by lead-] take a walk toward the oil mill. 'reach from i.he Kaly lo the t risc.o appear to me to When near the mill property Sween- on Main, from 10th to 12th on both w nt' the that the newjey appeared from the nearby build- Broadway and Towusend and trom. brewing trade is pain-1 and threw a gun in Teel's face. U-onmvuy to lownsendonl.th. jiU hllve informing him that he and the wo- flvo lights to each, block on both b that the old methods of! man were both under arrest. The sides of the street. riJ IIRLAIIOMANS INJUKKI) tho anti-reform whole-hog indul-: woman insisted that he put up a gence advocates are no longer suit-1 cash bond for both of them. He stat- a.ble to modern conditions. The i ed that he would not do sb unless coaches and a diner of westbound Both Sweeney and Mary Spark; WEATHER FORECAST Cloudy toni'ght anil toi-.'.orrow tore ui The following Oklahomans were 'among those injured: 13 Caha, Pryor. Okla. i O, L. Lilly, Stllhvater, Okla, Oeorge Wagoner. Okla. us, C. IV.stor. j probably ruin and wnrnipr tonight. Okla. There can be no doubt that the position of licensees is enormous- ly better than before tho war. They 1 work shorter hours, they have not _...... ;the same difficulty with drutiken- City, ness and they certainly do not make less money. will be tried Wednesday before Judge Brown, Sweeney on the charge of carrying a -pistol woman for assault with a. knife. Sweeney will then be tried in the county court for pointing a gun.   

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