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Ada Evening News: Saturday, October 11, 1919 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News (Newspaper) - October 11, 1919, Ada, Oklahoma                                 Stepmother Refused Title"Mother” bg Youth Takes Action That Brands Bim as Robber and Shatters Romance in “Bill Apperson's Bog”  l&\)t gfoa evening Jletosi  ADA, OKLAHOMA, SATURDAY, OCTOBER ll, 1919  THREE CENTS THE COPY  anil ukes usi  THE LION AND THE LAMB  IV IAMS IS L\R(iK AS VO DISASTER WIL!. NEW RECARD IX SAUS OF SFA.  REPORT-  MARK  AN  AN AIU'HIST LEADER TO START RWO RAI MISSOURI STATH TKXT1ARY.  |*l«H*OSVS OF THV PRXI*  hi tlir Vstoruili^ I  Archangle, Russia, Friday, Ort. IO.—Two thousand lives have been lost in the wreck of an unnamed British vessel on the Norwegian coast according to a wireless dis-* patch received here from Helsingfors. lf the loss of life in the wreck reported in the foregoing dis-: patch is as large as indicated, the disaster will make a new record in the annals of the sea. It would seem probable that the ship which was wrecked was a military transport bringing British soldiers from: Archangle, from which port Great Britain has been sending large numbers of men during the last month.  The largest recorded loss of life in a marine disaster occurred when the Titanic was sunk after colliding with an iceberg south of Newfoundland on April 14. 1912, the list of deaths showing 1,503 names. The Lusitania sunk by a German submarine Ma> 7.    1915. carried  down with her more than 1200 of her passengers and crew. When the Empress of Ireland was sent to the bottom in Gulf of St. lawrence on May 30. 1914. the loss of life was 1.027.  LONDON. Oct. ll. Neither the admiralty nor Lloyd’s have received any information relative to the wreck of a British ship on the Norwegian coast. At both of these sources the report is discredited  H> 3*leu*‘ S|*cr»iil Service NEW YORK. Oct.  ll. Just out of  federal prison. Emma Goldman proposes to start a movement to reform  treatment of women sent to Missouri state penitentiary at Jefferson City.!  Goldman makes no complaint ot her own treatment while serving 1  a term for anti-war propaganda. She says she was show n the utmost consideration.  “I trust that my protest against! the cruel treatment accorded the; unfortunate women in this prison will awaken th** American people to, the grim fact that in their own country and in the 20th century,: slavery exists in its most terrible} I or rn," she says.  “A foreman, a boy of 21. who, began in the art of slavedriving at) the ace of 16, bullies and terrorizes, the women, holding the club of the 1  blind cell and bread and water j over them. The vilest language is' used toward women, some of them j old enough to be this young man’s mother.  Task iv Im|n*»ible.  "It is utterly, impossible to keep the required speed day after  up  day to make the test the prison authorities demand The working bouts ar** nine hours, but to complete the task, the women are driven to the sweat shop method j of taking the work to their cells in the evening  ‘ The contract system is supposed to ha'e been abolished, but I have evidence that overalls.: jackets and suspenders from the Jefferson City prison are sold to private concerns in every state in the union, i intend to turn this evidence over to the labor organiza-i lions and to tile department of labor.  “Lilab Smith is in charge of the women prisoners. She has beet* employed in penal institutions since she was 15. Not once in 30 months did I hear her address one kind or: .encouraging word to a pris/her  JOHNNY EVERS SAYS THAT THE “REDS” ARE CHAMPIONS OF WORLD—AND DESERVE THE SAME.  PEOPLE WAIT ANXIOUSLY CONFIRMATION OF NEWSPAPER REPORT THAT RIGA HAS BEEN TAKEN.  CHICAGO, Oct. ll.—Pat Moran’s Reds are the champions of the world and they deserve to be.  The better club won in the annual post season classic. Luck was no factor in their victory.  Most people picked the White Sox to win on the strength of paper averages. I was among the few irho predicted  By the Associated Press  LONDON, Oct. ll.—Confirmation of a newspaper report that German forces have captured Riga is being awaited here, but if the disparity in the rival forces is as great as reported in some dispatches, the success of the attack I on the Baltic port would not be * i surprising.  that the Reds would win.!    “Germany’s new war” is featured  Pitching is of primary importance 1     the morning newspapers but the  in a wrorld series and in this de- i reports printed here have added partment the Reds were admitted nothing of importance to the dishy all to be superior. Their batting patches received by the Associated on paper was inferior to that of the Press. The whereabouts of General White Sox.    Von der Goltz continues to be the  But while I dont’ say the pitch- subject of contradictory rumors and ins in the national league is better j the estimates of the size of the than in the American, there are army commanded by Colonel Avaloff-inore good pitchers in the national; Bermodt also show a wide differ-than in the White Sox league.    ence.  Collectively, the White Sox have it is recalled that Count Keller, no apparent weakness. They were commander of a large force in the a great slugging club and derived Baltic provinces which was recruit-thc greatest advantage from a staff;  e( j f r0 m German troops, left by the of small but high class pitchers. | Allies at the time of the armistice But after following them it was, j g a  Baltic baron and formerly a plain there were individual taints g enera i j n  the Russian army. in the club.    *    , interest here now is largely foc-  Iteds \\ ere Smartest.    used in the result obtained from the  note which the supreme council of the peace conference is reported to be sending to Berlin today demanding the withdrawal of German troops from the Baltic provinces under a threat of coercive measures  female physician thinks she  ITH LD CURE THE PRESIDENT; WOMEN IHM TOUS “KNOW MOUE.”  to have  but vig-of help-  doc*  By £«m> Deckle*.  LONDON. Ort. ll “Let the tors admit some well knoi'ii woman physician to their consultations and they would arrive most quickly a* the nature and cure of President Wilson’s illness.'  This suggestion was today by Dr. Elizabeth of Portehester Terrace who is said  ! *» have trad* ot all 'he wTlo have been lift  made ti# me Honor Bone Hyde Dark. tile largest woman doctors d to lame. for  tune and scientific reeo^nitioi London du'ing the war  I had noticed thai London almost as much concerned the president's ii ness as the < home must be. I see peopl  in  at  was  about  cit ie>  in  busine* news € to the which I hi lobbies stores is rn u<  5 reading about it in the du iins. then turning eagerly long editorials regarding it  "Flogging is supposed been abolished in Missouri, orous slapping and cuffing less fharces still goes od.  "Women who cannot perform the! required task thru weakness ort ignorance are punished. Sometimes they are locked in their cells over the week-end on bread and water,[ sometimes they are confined for days in the blind cell with one; blanket aud two pieces of bread and two cup* of water a day to sustain* them.  TreaOllCnt is Fatal,  ••One woman who had beep ill aud unable to make the task was locked up on bread aud water for *19 days, then fed a heavy pork dinner on Thanksgiving day. She became unconscious and was removed to her evil where forcible feeding was attempted. She died. Influenza’ was given as the cause of her death!  “Since th.s incident, women are not k» pi in the blind cell more than thr,*e days.”  MVE HOM  I  Wm SM i KB IEI  The Reds outfielded and outhit the Sox thruout and were smarter on the bases. Cincinnati's season's 1  play proved it to be a game one-inning club. This was apparent during the series.    i  Before the series Rousch was the only Red player generally believed, Trom ttle  Allies. to be superior to the Chicago player in his position. But in the series every one of the Cincinnati regulars except Groh outshone his opponent.  At first base Daubert outplayed Candil and made his bat more valuable. At second base Morris Hath pulled one of the biggest surprises of the series by his hitting. His fielding also was superior to that of the highly rated Sox star.  Kopf’s work at shortstop bordered on the sensational. He outclassed Risberg in the field and at the bat.  Weaver Real Groli.  Contrary to expectations.  Weaver hod a comfortable over Heinie Groh at third Groh played remarkable ball  rn. HS IHE  Buck shade base. in the  TROTS AWAY WITH HOLDENVILLE RY A IS TO O SCORE. WET GROUND KEPT SCORE DOWN.  TAKEN FROM GERMANY AS ARMISTICE MATERIAL AXD THEN SOLD BACK TO THEM.  4 AIN SU LYING PHYSICIANS SAY PRESIDENT IS IMPROVING, RUT THAT HK MUST REMAIN IN BED.  FIVE MEX BOARDED TRAIN AS IT LEFT MEMPHIS YARDS AND COMMITTED DARING RORRER A’.  first few games but fell off toward the end of the series.  John Collins, who played right field in part of the games for the Sox. ranked on a par with Earle showed better than Nemo Leibold.  The High school football lads returned from Holdenville last evening with a 13 to 0 victory tagged on behind. The Holdenville boys proved staunch antagonists, but they were unable to stop the mighty plunges of Crawford and Cunning and the  a: «  , at  and n s  act ital up  p. i - i. cai •Oil! lite Iii theatres, in wherever I peculation as of tli»- attack  lh  it sn tot* i depart uienr go. There to the ex-tv filch terminated the president’» speech-making tour. And a lot of headshak-ing over the announcement that it is some >ort of “nerves." London understands and sympathizes with “nerves." For five years any kind of netve trouble from shell shock to plain worry has needed no explanation.  Dr. Bone insists that neurology is the woman physician's truest sphere and that therefore a man specialist should b*‘ among consultants at the president's side.  "Women have a peculiar gift for seeing the causes of nerve disorders," says Dr. Bone. "Home call it intuition. In hospital slang wej call it twigging.’ It i* really a sort of sixth sense, independent ot other sen sen.    *  “About nme-ieuthft of the diag-* noels in neurotic*! cases has to do with things outside the patient’s! bodily condtion. For example, I have* known hysteria to be caused by the: wallpaper and furnishings of a room.; A man doctor would never dream it was the cause of the trouble,’ but a woman would figure it out. i ‘‘I am not so silly as to say your  tv IMRIX KR CIN  By New - Spt ?  LONDON.  GERRIN ATTACK RIGA 4 AERIER OUT  n! Service  Oct. ll. It was stated  in ambulative quarters this afternoon that a combined German attack on the city of Riga was carried out under cover of a heavy boiiitardtuent by German guns. forc-Letrs to evacuate the city.  mg the  By ilie A»*»clated I*rej«-  WITH AMERICAN FORCES IN GERMANY, Sept. Im (Correspondence of the Associated Dress. I Twelve hundred motor trucks abandoned by the German army in the area taken ever by the Americans as part of the armistice material were sold recently to a syndicate of German automobile dealers. This deal virtually completes the work of the Coblenz branch of the United States Liquidation Commission which has been iinder the direction ol Junius G. Adams, of Ashville. N. (’.. special commissioner of the American Army of Occupation. J i Continuation of disposal of surplus army material iii occupi* d Germany will hereafter be under the direction of a general sales board of the American Forces in Germany which Lieutenant Colonel T. H. Kruttschnitt has been appointed as chief. The army board wiil be un der tile supervision of the liquidation commission with head quarters  By th*? A*wk*lated Pre?*  WASHINGTON. Oct. though President Wilson  11.—Al-continued  By the Associated Press  MEMPHIS. Tenn., Ort. ll. men who hoarded southbound 35 of  X.  Dercuin, Grayson, Ruffin, of this  issued  for an ion was  ence. between Dr. F. of Philadelphia. Admirals and Stitt and Dr. city.  The following bulletin was  today:    *    „    _  “White House. Oct. ll. 12:45 P. M. The president shows signs of continued improvement, but his condition is such as to necessitate his remaining in bed for an period. Signed:    Grayson,  Ruffin and Stitt.’’  he I senger train No  I  leaving  the  Five  pas-  Yazoo  stands alone iii lightning-like darts and sprints of work showed him Mallory, Fentem and Derrick. The greatest players Ada line held firmly, not cracking  ivr required'.oTmXTn'bJd! and Mississippi Valley Railroad as it indefinite period. This decis-reached today at a confer-  extended Dercnrn.  WO-  the  bed-  HIT SPRINGS, MI.  in Paris until the final stocks are  Dr. E. A. MacMillan, professor of biology in East Central State Normal. will leave Sunday for Hot Springs, Ark., for the benefit of his health. He has been granted a leave of absence by the state board with full pay.  Dr. MacMillan is a zealous worker in his department and his devotion to duty and overwork have underlined his health to such aa extent that he must recuperate. His many friends wish for him an early recovery.  I sold.  Th** sale of surplus property of ‘the American army at the Antwerp base which also has been completed brought to tit** government $14,060,-0(1(1, most of the goods disposed of to th* Belgian government, bringing a better price than could have been obtained in the United States.  By the Kale of a part of surplus stocks of the American Forces in Germany, much of which was sold to German civilians, the sum of ti I,OOH,666 was realized. Among  the Memphis yards early today, held up the express messenger and his helper, secured several express packages and escaped When the train was stopped at West Junction in response to a telephone message from the yardmaster who saw the men board the train.  When the train was stopped, the messenger and his assistant were found lying on the floor bound. One of the packages reported missing was said to have been shipped by a Memphis jewelry house.  Posses were organized quickly and began a search of tile surrounding section.  West Junction is on the outskirts the city and about four miles  Eddie Rousch center field. His to be one of the in the game.  Duncan was one of the stars of the game. He held his own with the great Joe Jackson, considering the fact that the Cincinnati youngster was making his first start in an important series.     1   Hay Schalk is one of the greatest catchers in the game, but in this series both ^liariden and Wingo outplayed him.  Kerr was the bright star of the White Sox pitching staff. tho worlds of credit must be given to the game Eddie Cicone came back and won after two defeats. Hod Eller was a particular star of the Red staff but all of Moran’s pitchers did high class work.  ot  from the yards where boarded the train.  th*  men  THE lilt; til FT DAY AT  NAPIER SCHOOL A SUCCESS  coil MINERS MD THE OPERATORS Un AGREE  in the entire sixty minutes of play.  Ada’s two touchdowns came in the third quarter. Derrick, playing halfback, shot a forward pass to Fentem, the midget quarterback, and Fentem plunged over the line for a touchdown. The attempt to kick goal failed.  In the same quarter the backs carried the ball down the field, mostly on line plunges, Crawford taking most of the hard heaving on himself. Towards the last of the quarter, Cunning replaced Crawford at fullback and dived through the line for the second counter of the day.  The Holdenville lads did not seriously threaten the Ada goal, though time after time they showed good football. The ground was heavy and a cold, wet wind made good football difficult.  Ada’s next game is here with the  same team next week.  B>  A'**iMt«xi Pre**  SALT LAKE CITY. Utah, Oct. ll.)  Lieut. Kelvin NY. Maynard, leaden in the eastern group of transcontinental fliers, and his observer, Waiter E- Richard«. left Salduro, one; hundred miles west of here. at 6:47 o’clock this morning. Pacific time, bound for San Francisco. The town  Yesterday by noon many things had been sent to the colored public school as the result of the appeal of the principal iii the way of contributions for the sewing class and \. oik for domestic science.  It is reported that besides cooking utensils, fifteen dollars were solicited by the school children, with which, under the direction of the teachers, purchases were made,  By the Associated Press  PHILADELPHIA. Pa., Oct. ll.— The conference of bituminous coal miners and operators in session here considering the demands of the miners for a sixty per cent increase  FIGHTING IN PETRIK ill AD  OVER SOVIET REGIME  By tho Associated Press  COPENHAGEN, Oct. ll.—According to a dispath from Helsingfors, Russian newspaper says that fight-has broken out in Petrograd  a ing  between adherents and opponents  of the Soviet regime. The counter  in wages and a reduction in work- 1  revolutionists have taken possession  ing hours disagreed today and will adjourn. A sub-committee that had been considering the demands,  of several important buildings and government institutions it is stated in the dispatch.  th. material Hold recent* to amu - f    Moimtalni     Nev..    i»    the    next    :     shpu ' ld V    KlCjn'thU    school'bn the! salons here yeeterday  dsalers was 2,660,000 pounds . candy of a kind not particularly In couiroi demand among the American sol diets.  STEAMER LOADED WITH  GUNS LANDS AT FIUME j  BUFFALO, N. Y., Oct. ll. Lieut.  E. C. Kiel landed here at 11:48 A.  ------- , jj" lading the east bound fliers in  DOUB ROBBERY TODAY IX    {transcontinental air race. Two  „    BCMSKBW    CHOTE*;    Jnufa    U«er    Major    Ber,    Spate    cam.|    *“e“d    It*    toThe  part of the public, as a product this school In the future will be an asset in the community in which the pupil may live. If you have any gifts in the way of dishes, plates, ietc., also used garments or cloth.  president can be cured by some! By th* Aaacrutcd Pre*®    »  woman doctor walking in and or-i FIUME, Oct. ll.—The .steamer dering the furniture changed about persia, bound from Genoa to the far or beseeching the American public< Fast with a cargo of thirty thousand to view more sympathetically tV ;  rifles, ten million cartridges, twenty league of nations.    I batteries of mountain guns and two  “But I do say that women make|^ aV y guns for the forces operating the best neurologists and that a Against the Bolshevik!, has arrived consultation of physicians of bothj a { Flume. The crew mutinied in the would be a splendid thing if Mediterranean and forced the cap  iases  prejudice could be set aside.”  WEATHER FORE!’ABT  Fair tonight and Sunday.  rising temperature.  with  tain  port.  to bring the steamer to this  sr'srs.r.r.si”*'" 1dl - ssMuarisyre z  Evl* encouragement possiblej general conference which began its  Ani*! Ka arivon thiu    tm the' swbIobs  ! hcte yesterday and recom-  point west of Salduro.  Unless something happens in the meantime to prevent it the leaders of the mine workers say that the strike threatened for Nov. I will take place.  Operators have declared they can-  *■ ■■■■ i t ,vn a     QU     ---    .    ,.    .    .     n     ischool    not    concede    either of the demands  CLEVELAND. P.. Pct, ll-     tl    wliS     announced by_Llwit._A.Jj.|  Th<> pr|ncipal dws nol  maintain  a i ot the  workers.  robbers this morning b^io up puts, in    of    the    control    station    »    wn# th** Nt*w& will rf€6iv61    mi vims nffrrtrd urn in w££it#ra  paymaster of the Santo., Bm.rmm  h „„,  that  Kiel and spat, would be ^one but    -ill reeve, The mine. affected are In western  Company in the lobby of an Euclid ^ ^u.Hi the weather clears.  Avenue building and escaped in an,    ----  automobile with $11,000 which the SALT LAKE CITY. Oct. ll.— paymaster carried In a money bag. C;.pt. H. C. Drayton, in machine No.  ----—    47    Rawlins, Wyoming, at 8:071  PRESIDENT IMPROVES WITH o’clock this morning, according to PROSPECTS OF RB<X>VERY official advices reaching this city.  WASHINGTON, Oct. ll.-Presl-  FIRST SKA LORD OF  ENGLAND HAS RESIGNED  By the Amsoelwted Press  LONDON, Oct. ll.—Vice Admiral Sir Rosslyn Wemyss has resigned as First Sea Lord. It is announced that he will be succeeded by Vice Admiral Sir David Beatty m&nder of the British Grand  com-  Fleet.  names and addresses and hand over pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana and ll-  to principal.    I linois. More than 360,600 men are  ~    involved,  s    Mrs.    Tttett    Dead.    I    ----------  It will pa> 'os m* wa»cn Want Ad columns of the News.  • h*  To Get Rid of Paint Stains.  Paint spilled on a doorstep Is most unsightly, and Is often rather difficult to remove. Th that case make a strong solution of potash and wash the step, leaving the solution to soak in. In a short time the i>sint will become soft  Mrs. Melissa Tilett, aged 18 years, f,KARI XCJ AMERICAN FINANCIER died at 3 o’clock yesterday morn- ; RIEB AT COUNTRY HOME TODAY r‘Vi‘ Van’ lie washvMl    off    with    soup    and  ing at her home in Portland Park. ! NYACK. N, Y., Oct. ll.—James N.     M    water    PaInt   She is survived by a little daughter • Wallace, president of the Central    *     <m    fof mme thne   A    »    Bal    niirht! it FXO Nev Oct ll— Lieut. BJ who is getting along nicely. The fu-i Union Trust Co., of New York, and  dent Wilson had another good night |    IL     neral  ^  lnte remen^rere conducted I  a  leading American fancier died  *    Mountain,    at 2:30 this afternoon. Rev. C. C.! at his country home early today  last night, ii was said today at White House and his condition parently continues to Improve.  the WL ap- fliers, landed •Nev., at 8:13  will yield to this trentment.  at  A.  I Battle  MHH  Morris, officiating.  from heart disease.  Lot a Want AU sen it for you.  I,  lr  It will pay you to which Want Ad columns a the Nara.  $2  It   

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