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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: October 8, 1919 - Page 1

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Publication: Ada Evening News

Location: Ada, Oklahoma

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - October 8, 1919, Ada, Oklahoma                             Strikes Are Common Enouoh But This Orphan's Great Prune Strike in "DadduLonaLeas" Takes Them All-American 9 A and frL ft THIS DISTRICT Ctoening BIG RETURNS VOLUME XVI. NUMBER 178 ADA, OKLAHOMA, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 1919 THREE CENTS THE COPY WrapsDistinguishedbyElegancei POU SKfOXl> T1MK IX KOW TAKK FROM MOKAVS MKX MAKK THK SKIUKS THKKK-FOVU- Score by innings: Chicago .......101 020 000 -4 Cincinnati. .000 001 000- 1 Chicago- 4 runs. 10 hits, 1 error. Cincinnati-- Chicago J. Collins K. Collins Weaver Jackson Kelseh Oandtl 1 run. T hits, 4 errors. l .hie-up. Duncan Rath ;ib_.......C.roh .....rf........ Neule. ......of...... Kouscn Ib..... naubert' Sehalk .........c........ Cicoue .........P........ Salli-O; Bauorios: Chicago Cuvtte and Sehalk. Cincinnati Sallee and Fisher and' Wingo. First Collins singles to een- field. K. Collins sacrifice? J. Col- lins to second base. K. Collins out at first. Weaver flips out 10 center: field. Jackson singles to left field. J. Collins scorins, VYlsch singles, i Jackson goins to sooond. Gandil, grounds oui to short stop. Three hits, one run. no errors. Ciueinnti--Katli grounds to K. Collins. Collins fumbling. Kath safe 6n lirst. Daubert tlies out to sec- ond. Rath remains on nrst. Olroh hits to second into a double play. No hits, no runs, oue error. Sts-oml Chicago-- Risbore out to short stop. Sehalk tlies out to riaht field. Cicotto srounds out short stop to first. No hits, no runs, no errors. Cincinnati Duncan tlies out to tit-lit. Kopf similes to left field. Noale tlies out to third base. Kopf S0fs out trying to steal sec- ond. Onv hit. no no errors. Third _ THE WORLD HE AMERICAN RED CROSS. Home Service. si-voxn ANNUAL MKKTIXG OF- THE OKCAXISSATUON WILL UK HELl> IN' THIS CITY SUNDAY. THOVSAXDS DRESSED IX UNI- FORMS OF GRAY FIND THE CITY READY FOR THEIR i COMING. The state i-onvention of the Bro- therhood of Railway Clerks will bej jheld in ibis city next Sunday. Oct.! 12. the same being the second con- I venlion of U'e order to be held in. the slate. i It is expected that between one hundred and fifty and two hundred j delegates will attend the session, andj it ijTqnite an honor that Ada should] be selected as the place of meeting. Tlie first convention of tlie zniioii was held iu Oklahoma City.' ai which meeting there were less! than two hundred delegates present.: At the meeting here next Sunda.Vj will be present nil the officers ofi the organization, and it is under- stood that much business affecting, the future welfare of the ofiler willj I be Ad'-r been 'VnThe' war was Home Service in the United States, the friendly connecting linu j maids and spon- liminy' limes as a convention city.; ibetween the soldier far from home and his loved ones. This branch OI lllc I sors of the various organizations 'there are many important. sath- jworfc which under the peace program Of the Red Cross will be eipanded to _....._ _ I benefit all who need the assistance it can provide, is directed by scientifically 'trained social workers. Since instituted Home Service has assisted 'soldl.-re' and sailors' families. This photograph shows one of the innumer- able Home Service information bureaus where service men and their families Vnuhi brui2 lliolr Drobluius for solution. By News' Special Service ATLANTA, G-a., Oct. .K. M. Van Zandt. of Fort Worth, Tex., commander in chief of the United Confederate Veterans, and Carl Hin- ton of Denver, Colo., commander of the Sons of Confederate Veterans, arrived late last, night to make, fin- al preparations for the opening here i today of the confederate reunion.- With the leaders of the two or- ganizations and preceding them came hundreds of the men who wore the gray, nearly all of them. in the uniforms of their organiza- tion and -wearing the southern cross of honor. Members of the Sons of Confederate Veterans and of the women's organizations added to the One of the finest constructive activities of the American Red truss m stations and in hotel erings which we illicit have _se- cured. had it not been for the fact that we have no hotel facilities adequate for large gatherings such as usually aitend these conventions, SKXATOU OXVKNS- 1. 1 I-OIXTS THAT KX- 1'I-AIX H. C'. OK Whether us the.result of more geu- ami ml fral prosperity ur tlio better education In styles of the buying public, cosits pd other duter garments for the com- ing fall nnd winter nre distinguished unusual elegatioe. That is. the fab- rics used for them nre appropriate and the lines on which they are iig and of a d-Mnre that In an address at national meetiiu ot bankers at St. Louis accomiiHidate-; itM-lf lo the rerently Senator Owen uave ihe lines of iho pi-.-s.-ni styles In following font teen points as an HOLIDAY DECLARED IN AVIATORS DEI AWAY ON BIB mm] RACE tliey lire not overtrlmmed or freakish in any particular. There are several new cloths, In- Diiins K. rluding many pile fabrics, used by the crounder to short manufacturers of wraps. Burn has eats u out Weaver hits Its own nnme and It would be burden- fn wnnn for'cini; J Collins out at >ome to undertake to memorize them bird base Weaver' beinp safe on ,11. But they tire soft, with velvet or F Collins interferes with mcde finish, resemblinp duvetyn find nnd is called out. [lolivin cloth which have mode them- Jacksou singles, scoring Weaver. familiar. Resides these there Felsch huf to infield, forcing Jack- kn, wool-furs nnd fnr fabrics that hits. 1 run. no er- i.pcome impurmnt tuiiong mate- The short .iiiek.-t wlii'cb has the ef- explanation of the high feet of a cape, shown In Ihe picture. Is made of u tanpe colored fni'-fiibrlc that resenihles moleskin nnd Is quite e as wiirm ami rich looking. Tlie Jacket nre graceful and dignified, and sets closely to the figure sail is belted t AMOtf..1Hl IMtAGUK. Sept.- 11. l By HAN FRANCISCO, Oct. P.-Richter. piloting a DeHaviland All of them are soft hi with a belt of the material that Cold expansion in America. tlThe Cwcho-SloVak continent of Reserve not ex- LOIN sick and wounded sold.eis, wiUl Li v ur.L, i-eceiHly passed through the Credit expansion, govern- L'niti'd Suites on their roundabout men, bonds, etc froi" llle Slberlan from Virginia to Texas, added a. touch of gaiety and youth to the gathering. Scores of high officers of the organization came in during the day, including General Van Zandt's staff. The visitors found Atlanta dec- orated more gaily than its citizens had ever seen it before. Eighty-five city blocks of streets were aflutter with flags and bunting. Boy Scouts and members of the American Le- gion save aid and directions to the I visitors. Ten thousand of them will i be cared for at. Piedmont park in army tents and others housed in hotels and private homes. Special arrangements have been made to feed the veterans. Warthm: prices of material have arrived safely (.___ I 1 rv, l.tT 1 fli 1-fCJ-A i Q LI 1C VV. LCI O.11-J. wiui i-ieui. J. B. Patrick, observer, The veterans and members of the leaving the ground at a. m., auxiliary organizations will be for- was the first of the western avia- mally welcomed this afternoon, anc .vrt, iVta Tnn miTp c-accinnc ctflrtpd P in vim n iii-ii o. 4. Wai-tiim: prices of material T. K: Diminished production back and front. It fastens nt tors to get away in the 2.700 mile nice to Mineola, N. Y. Aviator D. A. Carfiss was second front, holding tho garment snugly to place To accomplish a graceful wrap peace industries. the designer has set in shaped C. Destruction of shippm o _ j. 1. nnu and all streets diiction in Europe. ITINSABE oTfi (1 U son at second. Cincinnati- Wingo walks. S.xllee out 'o field. Ra'b   His plane carried no observer. The ...were Packed with thousands I eo- machines tool: the air in bv than. _they of --ir closely followed by Miree more. S "strikes cheering, shouting crying Prune Strike Broken at due ,o wor John Grier Orphanage by Hesitancy of capital because a, with them. i with joy. Groups; Hard Cider Jug business sessions started later. A great parade Friday will be the crowning feature of the reunion. Red Cross Roll Call Conference Is On Tomorrow striction of production iother searching rcng e veterans for the! which Mary Plckford will be seen one in many a, t eater, n held at Oklahoma City. Oct. will be outlined there for the fqrth- lH'ir 15.0U.) mile ney .He.', has the best of i career. onicitus i.uiii HAKTFOHD, Conn.. On. 7.-Con-. r 'nn- and neighboring sections of j necticntt is reputed 1o be the most w-is the Sheriffs' olfice beerless and whiskeyless state in the "ye.-K-rday and others wired cast. Any thirsty resident of .-i-roi-s. information on th L 111 1 1 ,1 il U U II illlltr i (11T uv.oi- iw train two hours after all the ..ion pool- orphan child, ever helping those -had gone." said Ur. James H. her and making the most of u gone.' said ur. .liunes n. nor ana maiviu.- fT il fldu' Harris which gram' of Trenton, -V. J., one of the cnlel treatment, she finally rises f o'cZk of The picture was diluted by tor J F. Owens, will be present. In attendance at the meeting will be the following Red Cross officials from Southwestern Division Head- quarters in St. Louis: Division Man- ager Alfred Fairbank, Roll Call Di- rector for the Division; Edward Hid- Miss Charlotte E. Taussig, -Di- Executive ilKrs nutllwlllth containing alcohol in j one and in September there were h i rd Kt' i irut's iu v- v, v i now' pi.o'hing for Cincinnati in- .mounts which will i 1. r _ r> f m-Tti c n mln Lons Lees" is especiall Iliad done in the repatriation of the of 'lauch-winning situations of many because of the fact that in launch- i Cxech soldiers, pledging the couu- ing the campaign exclusively for 01 Mm.dil grounds o-.u Most o: the arms distributed am- 'i.itch'er to 'first! Kisberg strikes out. ong the white residents last week Two hits vo runs, nvo errors. as a means of protection were turned Cinc nna i Kopf flies on. to right in today following a general request tied N'eale singles to left field, issued by Sheriff F. F. Kitchens. Wingo walks Heuther is pinch hit- In military circles the opinion ing Visi.er. Reuther flies out was 'bat the troops would to third base liath u-rounds out be withdrawn later in the week. A shortstop to first. One hit. no runs, handbill circulated today by the m errors committee of seven and addressed SUth InninR. to the negrot-s of Phillips county. now pitching for contained the following advice: Cincinnati. Sehalk flies out to left "Stop talking; stay at home; go Held. Cicolte strikes out. J. Collins. lo work; don t worry hits to left field for two bases. E. The circular stated "Soldiers now nub iy tn-iu (_ return Collins strikes out. One hit, runs, no errors. strikes Wood alcohol was said by the PO-I lice to be (he probable cause of] the increased drunkenness. MlCKlESAKS no her? to preserve order will return i to Little Rock within a short time." (..incimtiii i iviiuut-rt. w. hits to left field for two bases. AI'l'BAL nearly a home run. Rousch grounds TKOOP W1THWIAWAL HKEDKD out IV ti IIU III I U LI. uiii. n f, t v j. second to first. Groh goes to By The Amecintcd Prt-ss (Continued on Page IAKEM UP IH ADA COPENHAGEN. Oct. Ger- maji government's appeal to the troops und'-r General Von der Coltz ;o withdraw from the Baltic prov- inces proved successful, ac- cording to a Berlin dispatch received here Tuesd-ay. The return of some of Mho troops began on Saturday, It la 'declared, and several transports bearing contingents of these troops will leave shortly. Harry Kemp and Maurice Mr. R. ch a, wk" up last night by Deputy, Noel, both of Francis, were united Sheriff vVhltwm and Policeman in marnage last night at 9 o clock. and lodged in the county Judge H. J. Brown offlciatlns. The jail. They claimed to have beaten! wedding occurred in the judges ol- thcir way from Chicago to Ada 'byifice. riding the blind baggage. Juvenile, riing te n chart-cH have been filed against the! Regardless of our own necessity, they will be given a hoar-lew should work because of the need I Tuesday "before Judge Bnsby. (of the world, By tho Anfocintod Trust MINEOLA, N. Y.. Oct. Ten machines, all of which flew in a northwesterly direction, had left Roosevelt field by A. M., maintaining a speed of 120 to 150 miles an hour, Because of the excellent flying conditions, army officials predicted that many of -the contestants would reach Cleveland by nightfall. The arrival of the first three planes at Bingliampton was reported to of- ficials here at A. M. The machines were piloted by Major Smith, Lieut-Colonel Hartney and Lieut. Maynard. ATTBMPT .MADE TO WRECK SHKBT AND Tl NPfjATK CO. By tho AnBoclutRd Pittsburgh, Pa., Oct. at- tempt was made lo wreck the plant of the American Sheet and Tinplate Company at McKcesport today when a bomb was thrown into the ship- ping department building. It ex- ploded tearing a large hole in the roof of the structure. No one was injured. VWEtl, tOSf N. BID INOUSIRIAL I is trying to make them "show off" memberships the co-operation of smaller as well as the larger com- munities must be obtained. The delegates from Ada are J. T. By Ihe AnnociRtcO Press WASHINGTON, Oct. of the three groups oeing ready to pre- sent any business for consideration, the Industrial Conference adjourned this morning until tomorrow after IlUiV LIICJ V1A i prunes; and how Judy Abbott (the suushiny little orphan played by Miss Pick Cord) aided by a freckled- face little boy, play tricks upon the matron's daughter, are only a few of the hu-morous episodes in which the picture abounds. As well as being a picture which will tug at the heart strings of ev- ery parent, "Daddy Long Legs, will make the children and the childless elders laugh, for there are dozens of sweet and funny little X President's Sig So Changed No One Knows It Una dozens or sweei immj in session ess than no h Thursday and "cn'-.iiialist.s, "farmers Friday, and publicists. ONK KUi STEKI- PLANT TO BY BHITISH STEAMER SUNK; AMKHICAV SHIP TAKES CREW WASHINGTON. Oct.. changed has been the signature of the President since his ill- ness, it was learned today, that clerks in the senate receiving official communications from the White House have almost doubted its authenticity. Sev- era! days ago one of the clerks received a paper signed "Wood- By the AMoeiated HALIFAX, Novia Scotia, Oct. The -British steamer, Simcrgh Castle, By Iho AnsocinllHl PrfRS YOUNGSTOWN. Ohio, Oct. Negotiations between union leaders and officials of the Trumbull Steel; Company of Warren, near here, ledja- to a statement today at strike head-, by an agent of t -mer nuarters that an agreement by the raent fro mthe American steanl" quain-j.1 imvi un no_____ j Kica.mer renorts WEATHKK 'FOKBCAST Cloudy tonight and Thursday with scattered showers. Warmer tonight In southeast portion of the state, and cooler in west portion. company to permit reopening is ex pected soon. The negotiations were taken up at the request of the Amalgamated Association of Iron, Steel and Tin workers, H was stated, an agreement with the Afel. The American steamer reports that she has taken on board the crew of the British steamer. GALVrESTON, Tex., Oct. British- steamer Sizergh Castle, re- wtio nave an sunk at sea, sailed, from Gal- company and desire to affect an, veston on Sept, 16 with a cargo ol agreement for the rest of the em- busehls of wheat for the ployees so that they can return to'account of. -the Belgian Kelier com- row and was so shocked at the way In. which the name was wrtten that he hurried down to a senator who is known to receive letters and notes frequently from the President. "Is that the President's, sig- asked this clerk. I do not think it said the senator at first but when shown what the document was he -r changed his opinion to express the probability that the dif- ference was on account of the President's Illness. work. mission.   

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