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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: October 3, 1919 - Page 1

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Publication: Ada Evening News

Location: Ada, Oklahoma

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - October 3, 1919, Ada, Oklahoma                             Dorothy Phillips star of "The Right to Happiness" plays a dual role, as the Bolshevik girl, as Vivian the millionaire's daughter Ctoenmg JJtto VOLUME XVI. NUMBER 174 ADA, OKLAHOMA, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 3, 1919 THREE CENTS THE COPY VICTIM OF PAKKTOWN BAT-i SOX ON HOMK ILK MVES SKVKX DAYS UKAT MORAX'S Irt O WITH A IXXtF.X HOIKS IS1VK SCOBK. MAKING SHOT THRU HIM. THK SKR1KS TO 1. The ungro Brady who was shot. Baueries: and r-chalk. in a gun tight in Parktown on and 1-eo.ue and Thursday of last week died this morning about 4 o'clock.. It was; gCOre by innings: known from the first ilia. Brady Chicago.........020 100 was desperately wounded and that, he had a slim ciiance of recovery.; but he lived for seven days with: about a donen holes shot through, his intestines. Piiul Combs, the negro who shot Brady, went at onco to the county i jail 'and cave himself up to officers when he learned that Brady had died. Combs himself got an. uglv shut :n the right breast but liiis. 1 error. own pistol. "Black Bess." the bru- t0 nette easus belli, is about recover- One .ed from the bullet wound she re- ceived. Kii-st liming. grounds out toj shortstop. Daubert flies out to center; Groh fouls out to catcher. No hits, no runs, no errors. flies out to leit; ..0....._- field. K. Collins grounds out to, .was not seriously hurt. From all re- pitcher. Weaver flies out to first ports the trouble, it would seem base, xo hits, no no errors, that Brnuy was to blame for the dif- Second Inning. ficully, he having gone to Combs' grounds out- house'with a drawn gun. which he Io shortstop. Duncan singles to right, snapped at Combs several times be- Kopf grounds out to shortstop.: fore the latter got busy with his'iHinoiiu going to second. Neale nnsi second base and is out at lirst.! m- hit. no run, no errors. singles. Felsch; hits to pitcher, who throws wild to; Second. Jackson goes to third and Felsch goes to second. Gundil sin- gles Jackson and Felsch scoring. goes to second. Risberg walks. Schalk bunts to pitcher, forc- ing Gaudil at third. Kerr has to pitcher, forcing Risberg at third. Liebold grounds out to third. Two hits, two runs, one error. ______ Third liming. grounds out Probably there was not a happier (0 base. Fisher hits a slow- boy in Pontotoc county .Saturday! grouuder to third and is safe on than George Albert of Steedmarv first. Rath pops out to shortstop, when he received transportation, in- paubert grounds out 10 second base, eluding Pullman fare, together out pjsher at second. One hit, meal and lodging tickets, to Dallas. ,.UI1Si no errors. Texas, to enter Grubb's Vocational chicago---K. Collins singles to left School. field. Weaver singles. Collins stop- "I cannot imagine how I could ml second. Jackson flies out to have gotten by without the assisi- base. Felseh grounds out to ance of the local Red Cross." said; base. Weaver being caught Mr. Albert just before leaving second. Two nits, no runs, no Dallas. He came to Ada a total stran 'errors. -er here uud badly disabled fromj Fourth limli.R. wounds received In the military singled. Rousch vice in France. Ho had a wife nnd grounds out to shortstop, Groh go- baby to support, and a? usual, to second. Duncan grounds out compensation from the government to shortstop, Groh going to third was very slow In coming. He worked and getting caught off the base. One for a time in an Ada restaurant] 110 runs. no errors, under the greatest Physical grounds out to THE STRIXE-ITIS GERM HAS SPREAD TO ENGLAND PHYSICIANS HOW) ____________ ABOUT HIS CONDITION. ttlS DAUGHTERS KUSH1VG TO: MTS BEDSIDE. By the AsHOCiftLwl Prc.sij WASHINGTON. Oct. 3. 2 P. M. (Ada If is much worse. Grave doubts entertained of his recovery. it By Lliu Arfsocijucd Press WASHINGTON, Oct. was no improvement in President Wilson's condition this morning and Rear Admiral Grayson, his physi- cian, held another consultation with Rear Admiral Stitt of the Naval IXJSMlIAli .Bte.VKEM> -j By the Associated Press WASHINGTON, Oct. unions representing more than two million workers will not participate in the Industrial Conference called by President Wilson for next Mon- day unless the basis of labor rep- resentation is changed TO include the chief executives of all international and national unions. Timothy Shear of the Brotherhood of Rail-way Firemen said today the change in representation had been suggested to Director General Hines, but that no reply had been received and none was expected. Because of this, he said, the four brotherhoods did' not expect to go into the con- ference and it was thought the four- Kear Aamira.i ui LUC i erence an t was toug e Medical School and Dr. Ruffin, Mrs. teen other railroad, unions affiliated Wilson's family physician, who par-1 with the' American' Federation of ticipa-id in yesterday's consultation Labor also would not participate. with 'Dr. F. X. Dercum of Philadel-i-------------------------- phia. I Oklahoman Still Tied Up. The president slept some last j The Daily Oklahoman IK still tied With him is a trained nurse who is assisting Mrs. Wilson in car- ing for the patient. The president 1 had no temperature and his heart i action is good, it was said at the White House. Mrs. William G. McAdoo and Mrs. Frances Sayre. daughters of the president, are on their way to Wash-] ingtoii. Mrs. McAdoo will arrive this afternoon from New York. Mrs. j iSayro is coming from Williamston.: Mass. Miss Margaret Wilson, the: third daughter, is now in Washing-j ton. I up with the strike of the printers, very much to the discomfiture of T- 0. Cullins, the local agent here. Mr. Cullins was in communication with the management this morning, how- ever, and seems to be sure that the difficulty will be settled within the next forty-eight hours. caps. Just as ho began to wonder where his neJct dollar was coming from, a representative of the local third. Risberg triples to right field. Schalk bunts to pitcher, beating it to first and scoring Risberg. Schalk from, a rvpreseuiauve m uie iwa- TO insi auu Red Cross discovered him and trying to steal second. Kerr ed eomething of his circumstances, grounds out to shortstop. Two hits, no cause run. i no error. Fifth liming singles to right Since then he has had worry. The Ked Cross began at once Lw press his claims' for compensation.! field. N'eale grounds out to second, in 'he meantime loaning him sum- forcing Kopf out. Neale is safe on cient money to live on and support first. Rariden grounds out to third, his family. Before his compensation, (Continued on Page Four.) arrived the Red Cross interested thej vocational training department Mr. Albert's case and recently got, him ad-mitted into the Grubb's Vo-, cational -School. He has repaid the Red Cross money advanced but says he can repay the kindnesses; received. "1 can never begin 'o repay the. lied Cross for iis interest in inc." said Mr. Albert. "1 am_ also under- president of Henry Ken deep obligation to Mr. W. A. Barrett al Tulsa. will occupy who assisted me in a very material ,h( way." Mr. Albert stated that he will receive an allowance of J135 a "Vunday. Dr. Odell is month from the government wlnle m but school. .lls one Of ,he leading ministers stored Corpus Christi Grateful to the Salvation Army DALLAS, Oct. at all manner of tasks twenty-four workers of the Salvation Army drawn from all corps cities of the southwest have been highly com- mended in their work by Roy Miller chairman of the Corpus Christi re- lief committee in a telegram to Herbert B.' Ehler finance director for the Salvation Army in the southwest. The Salvation Army corps work Open Letter From Vanoss Sailor Judge Bolen to Leaves to Take A da Labor People Work in Drawing PUBLIC mm mm DISABLED Later Reports. WASHINGTON, Oct. 3, 1 P. It was said that the family had not been summoned, but that Mrs.. Sayre and Mrs. McAdoo liad expressed a desire to come. Orders of the physicians that the president be kept absolutely quiet will be strictly enforced, Secretary 'Tumulty said today. No official bus- iness will be brought to the execu- Judge J. W. Bolen. who recently received a handsome cut glass set and gold watch from the labor poo- pie of Ada and vicinity as mark of their appreciation of the speech he delivered in Ada on Labor Day, Arthur Price of Vanoss has left for St. Louis to enter the David Rankin Jr., Trade School. Mr. Price served for a time in the navy but was discharged on account of physi- cal disability received in line of drty. The activity of the local Red delivered in Aaa un UO.ULM arty, i ne activity UL LUC juiai hands the News the following open j sccured Mr. Price an appoint- letter to .those who made the by the vocational department ents to him. Inasmuch as more than iwo hundred people contributed to the purchase of these presents, the judge finds it imposisble to write a ne 'i. regard tor made a housing survey of Cor-j personal letter to each of ilieni andi c Christ! immediately after their presents this open Tetter thru the _______ 10 the St. Louis school and he has gone to take up mechanical drawing. Before leaving Ada he expressed his high regard for the work of the Red M MAIBT pulpit "at the First Presbyterian church at, both morning nnd evening iL .___ it M n v have of the state. It will be remember- ever since. Mr. and Mrs. 0. 1-. ulson n.m. ms pus Christi immediately after their 'arrival. They got into the city on the first train that pushed through. I Since that time they have assisted in the work of feeding the refugees j in the camp established for them. They are now in charge of feeding and'housing all refugees in the de- doing .n.igiuncent work part of our rt lief Mr. Miller said ID his telegram to Mr. Ehler. Lieuten- ant. Colonel Geovge Wood and a large corps of workers arrived here as communications were re- have been on the job live's attention, pressing. no matter how Dr. Grayson talked with Dr. Der- cum at Philadelphia by long dis- tance telephone this morning and will keep in constant, touch with WASHINGTON, Oct. 3 The place- ment officer of the Federal BoaTd for Vocational Education is always careful when negotiating with em- ployers to inform them of the physi- cal condition of the disabled men for whom employment is sought. In or- der that their physical handicap may be minimized as much as possible all disabled soldiers in need of medical examinations or treatment or hos- pital care, during their, course, of training under the Board, where such need is traceable to war ser- vice, are referred to the medical of- wlll Ktilip III (.v-ivyii ill c uriCllCU tU LUC him. Dr. Dercum will come tolncers of the Public Health Service Washington from time to time as' in the district, who are at the Dr. Grayson feels he needs him. -1-- Dr. opinion. THILADELPHIA, Oct. Francis X. Dercum of this city, a noted neurologist, who examined President Wilson as a consulting physician, said today the condition is grave but that he is of a cheerful frame of mind. columns of the News. vasiated zone. "The Salvation Army To the Laboring People of Pontotoc; County: Gentlemen: i urn in receipt of a very beauti-i llie r, I'ul cut glass sei and a beautiful t'he Lakevie watch, cliain and charm, presented to as a token of appreciation of my remarks on Labor Day. I appreciate Alclrtcli Is There. The News bull dog was favored yesterdoy with a 'huge watermelon. gift, of C. S. Aldrich who owns Poultry Farm, the from a second crop raised on the same same being planted und reinarKs on u.u. i ground. U was an elegant specimen these for their Intrinsic values andiand superior in meat and flavor to beauty, bui this Is nothing compared! thoi-.e of the lirst crop. All of which with 'the sentiment that moved youj js further proof that Pontotoc coun- to give me these nice presents, the- (y ,s capable of more than the most Service MUSKOGKE, Oct. Eu- gene M. Kerr, state senator, and Thomas D. Lyons of Tulsa have been the Arkansas riv- Thlocco allot- lfC to Marshall, Tex., where Mr. ed That he delivered the commence accepted a posit ioi :i Davidson has with day and word received tro.il i todav is to the effect that they are1 who can do s well' Pleased with their new M'nday. lion. sermon at the normal In ihf and made a _...... i the city "should hear Dr. Odell No task was too large or too of real friends-hip, so pure and lofty. Personally 'I feel un-1 i worthy of such a devotion, but am 'glad 1 can have a full conception of o'ptouiislic could have drempt. It is believed that by proper manipulation three crops year of most any menial for them to undertake perform. They have made a thor- ough survey of our housing facilit- ies and provided us with valuable Information. They have help in all .our relief kitchens and now have i exclusive charge of feeding the oc- t nn I utiTw it i. i-v-- UuilIH I its meaning and a determined effort coujd to hold it in the highest, respect, i adaptable crop grown in this country be raised. ihe expert automobile me-: the Willis-Over-, Mrs. M. J. Miller and little son, i cupants of our camp. chanic. is now land Repair Shop. 113 North Broad- wav. Let him tlx your car and do it of Ok.milgee. who have been. guests, for the past several rich'. ADA is After Good Things. The this morning to their home at Ok- mulcee. Mrs. Miller Is better known to Ada' friends as Miss Fannie Pat- v" a-- "They are poor advertisers be- cause they are too busy working. Wo are grateful to the "army" be- yond words. It has no superior In the field of unselfish service." EVERYBODY boost the WHITE WAY. 10-3-at SCENE OF WORLD SERIES GAMES AT CINCINNATI Boys, 1 am for you with determin-l Teachman and family, 'neM C.1S6S to h J. r. time the Board's medical represent- atives. Similar arrangements have been made for dental treatment and the service of specialists. The Pub- lic Health Service will also supply and repair artificial limbs for dis- abled men receiving vocational train- ing. The National Catholic War Coun- cil, through its committee on recon- struction, has arranged to give free medical service in certain districts to discharged disabled men and their families for one year after discharge. An agreement has been reached by the Council and the Division of Ci- vilian Relief of the American Red Cross and the Bureau of Public Health Service, that duplication of such services will be prevented. The National Catholic War Council is only one of the many agencies that 'is co-operating with the Federal Board for Vocational Education in the reeducating of the disabled sol- dier, sailor and marine. In accepting the aid of the -agencies that are co- operating with the Federal Board. mem cases TO j. i-. Tulsa it was learned at the Fed- no dunes tor which the Board is ie- era, building today. Oil holding In ibleelegated each of the cases are snid' to be over a million dollars. The appointment, which was made by Federal Judge Williams late yes- terday, came only after an all-day thev have been living in Garfield i ation and without reservation. I. feelj d t Ada atter an absence that you stand more for the thoughts! during which time! conference with interested pait.es. that I represent and the code of01 fa. r n nractK-nl oil ma justice for which I stand tlinn-you do for me. You and 1 will pass away, but the rights of men will never puss. The business of men 'Is large and complex and gives rise to many opinions as to how it should be con- ducted and regulated, and those who are totally Intolerant of the views ,md judgments of other people them. Their assistance sired. The East Central State Normal boys will leave this afternoon for Tulsa where they will meet Henry county, where Mr. Teachmun has been fanning. Mr. Teachman will be associated in the cotton busi- ness with S; W. Hill during the cot- ton season at this place this year. Mr. Teachman and family are well and favorably known in Ada and they have a number of friends who 
                            

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