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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: October 1, 1919 - Page 1

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Publication: Ada Evening News

Location: Ada, Oklahoma

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - October 1, 1919, Ada, Oklahoma                             The greatest love storg ever told "The Right to Happiness" Dorothy Phillips, William Stowell, with "Heart of Humanity" cast pleases all WTHIS DISTRICT 16 RETURNS VOLUME XVI. NUMBER 172 OKLAHOMA, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 1919 n THREE CENTS THE COPY OK STKKKX CM, cox- BY XKOKO CAUSKS THE fATTl.K MKX' I I'AUT OK OKLAHOMA. KAXS CHKKIUNG K1VOIUTKS IX WIG PARK; BETTING IX FA- VOR, OF CHICAGO. THKJHIDIOKKXOAXT BOUND OVKIt TO: DISTRICT COURT IX PRELIM- j JXAUY 'KXAMINAT1OX YKSTEHDAY. R.T thf AsaooUtfd PreM OKLAHOMA CITY. Del. 1.- -Ke- ports reaching Oklahoma City to- day from outside sources thai dis- turbances .were rife in the city f J. M. Williams, a conductor on the Fourth street car line, was shot and killed early yesterday by I an unidemined negro immediately following a quarrel over a fare. The negro escaped by leaping from the car. A posse of one Hundred men was organized to search for him but up to a late hour last night he had not been found. No informa- tion on the subiect was available at police headquarters this morn- ing. Reports that Governor Robertson Bj tha AMuxiuttHl Press WASHINGTON. Oct. man K. H. Gary of the United States Steel Corporation was culled to tes- tify before the senate committee in- Ivestigating the i morning. He was for the strik-l M-T wi'lTae by Wil-l SW _ _ f u i iii I Uarrett, one of ihe best known cattle men of ihls county, returned today from a trip to Atoka and Kiowa, where he went on business. Mr, Barrett reports that cattle men throughout, this suffered Cincinnati: Chicago: Hits. Chicago-----.-----------------------6 Cincinnati------------------------13 By i lie AmAciHtoil Frvsm CINCINNATI. Oct. only four Innings today loss (luring the Foster, secretary of last who strike committee, and followed by Michael S. Fighe, pres-1 idem of the Amalgamated Associa- tion of iron, Steel and Tin Workers. Other witnesses are to be heard in the Pittsburgh district by the committee, as they plan to carry thousand dollars a he will be'worth several thousand ooi.ars a "eat! year have had to sell, heir real had ordered state troops held in readiness to put down possible rioting could not be confirmed eith- er at the Governor's office or at the office of Adjutant General C. F. j Barrett, of the Oklahoma National j Guard. A crowd of approximately 200 men und boys hung nbout the cen- tral police station yesterday, but; no disorder was attempted. Ardmore People Ask That Reed Cancel Date into the heart oTtlie strike "zone. The investigation will be held either the last of this week or early next week, depending upon the peace treaty developments in ihe senate. estate holdings in order to their obligations. The drop in the market price of cattle has affected many farmers and ranchmen in this county, ac- cordinu to the statements of those interested. One man in particular lia  AFTER SOME OI-' .MOST PRESSING OFF1C1- IH'SIMOSS. MOST TIME WITH FAMILY. Press WASHINGTON. Oct. -With II ill [in l UIIU i I in i i (111 11 i_ j tiuu i v i i 11 v. liny st V III1 L I DOS 6 i-iotin- Ml those arrested are held for the series! tending him in his illnusswere con- ror eitht-r murder, inciting to riot, even 'o thel corned today in preventing anj t-N- or assault 10 commit murder and Qf ,he to take part.I ertion which might cause a it- wilful destruction of property. A headquarters of both clubs gavei lapse. special grand jury will convene Oct. that Reuther, Although U was "Ke'J S to imiuiiv into the charges agiunai ,hi, lied, would oppose ihal Hit president would be pernm- ihe men onm- HIP Hani handed hurler of ted to give a small portion ot hu S to imiuiiv into the charge the men. Dr. K. C. Henry stated I his morn- that the coiulition of Mayoi by thought all danger past. EDDIE CICOTTE The mass met-tin- was over by the Itev. Dr. Robert K. Lee; Morgan, pastor of the Ardmore Methodist' church. s S'.'h.-.lk, 1'All. AI.THOISK TO SlNti IN NORMAL Ilanvy. 111., A.IK- Due to the fact that ihe High; played hi? first a prolV. -.ch.Mj. buiid'ing no suitable an-' sional at Tnyk-rvilSe. 111., m .HI. hvn itu indiiv-Js vl i n where he nuivie .su'ch an unpruiM.-i. that the year he got a job be at the normal auditorium. This. DK.lidt.d lo Comii-kcy. He was kindness is highly Iippn-Ciai-Ml ".v; Ir.tc- ii- IDrj. nuikins: gi-i-'l the hiKh school anthoniies. undfi'i ,u is fcct ir.chup, whose auspices Mr. Aliliouse will- 100 pounds, Lats nnd throws sine. handed, is niarriuii, und lives in CHIC GANDIL IIU-I-KTINS FROM I'lATlNNATI i GKKAT BASKBAM., TO ASSEMBLED -TIMttVO. "DUTCH" REUTHER ted to give a small portion of his Sox. while Wlngo willjday to pressing official business, the nil- that the condition ol .Mayor ba.-kstop Ketitlier .1.111! Kay Schaik-mosl nt his time Is to be spent Ktlward r. Smith, who was attacked. Paichinp for Cicotte. I with his family at [he White House the mob, was such that ho Thtre is no doubt that, the White 01. moiorin Sox wen! into the fray this afternoon as slight favorites. The little betting that has be.MI recorded showed odds of from to 5 to 7 10 5 with the C'hicago team ou the long end. Con- .sirediililo While Sox money was In but i-vi-n monoy was de- i'.naiuled with very few takers. T'.uii both teams are. confident was indicated by the statements i heir managers. Manager Moran ofj Cincinnati team staled: "We have earned our way into l In- series and we will earn our way through it. J believe that we have iihe better pitching. In fact, I do not know when a team ever went into so i great an event with so strong a 'string of firsi class hurl ers. I have six mm on whom 1 can depend for M'xcellfcnt service." Manger Gloason of the White Sox i gave voice to the following: i "My team battled its way through it he American league with such con- fidencc and such actual nerve in all pinches that I have the utmost confidence in each and every player.] :At the same time 1 that wei '.are going to be submitted to a su-' prr-my It-si, in this series. I believe. howvvcr, my pitchers have been un-   at Norcross, O.a. blurted as c-itcher Ilt, with Greenville club of Carolina as- l__the And despite the w sociation, in In Aupust of t.he following year sold to St. Louis Car- dinals. 'Remained with St. Lo-iis for next four years and achieved much fame KS a thrower and batter. In __ ularity of the more modern compet- itors of the broom as a household utiliey carpet, sweepers and vacuum weepers the demand for the broom In tt I 11C fame KS a thrower and batter, in pvoduct has very noticeably in- the wmtcr rf P last fevf years and Manager Herzpfr_ of Jhc Reds and ,-in. islied product have prevailed. JAKE DAUBERT 'cf j vi secured him in a trade for Mike Gon- zalez, and this is his fifth year with the Reds. Walter H. born Sep- 12, 1833. Went directly from classic at, "Western league nnd then to Boston mlooll Ihil, RiKier would ofllclal.e at HVP beln" re- [n the American league, from where EvanR a, s aie Demh he was Obtnmed by the White Sox -it exchange in 1911. He is 5 feet 8 inches and will i i _ _..___j_ TT_ ___i ith rd. Tomorrow tho umpires Umpli-rs ScIwiiMl. tenibor 12, 18M. Went directly trom CINCINNATI, Oct. l.-.-Ofllciall St. Ipnati'us's in California, inotincement was made shortly aft- to T __   teason. Uy i hi) AsmciHlnl I'ri-ss LONDON. Oct. T. While the del- Bolshevists Get Drubbing at the Hands of Finns WEATHER FORECAST c-loudinese tonight and y COPENHAGEN, Oct. breaking of Hhe bolshevist lines til. Bulativ by -the troops of the Finnish general Balflkovltch is reported Jn a dispatch just received, here. Whole divisions of the bolshevik! are de- clared to havt surrendered. pgates of the Transport Federation were at-sembling todivy to decide whether the workers they represent should go out in sympathy with the strilcing railroad men Great. BritMu, the government's of- llcial report on the situation issued at noon announced a continued im- provement in actual conditions. The train service had been im- proved, the statement asserted, more tha.i SCO trains having been run 1 yesterday including those in the subway service. Additional railroad men had returned to work, it was I declared. The meeting of the transport -men marked the miost critical moment so far in ihe labor situation brought about by the railroad tieup. The meeting was attended by 'represen- tatives of the Amalgamated En- gineers Federation, tne snip building and engineering trades, the priming and electrical trades, the railway clerks, the new postal federation nnd the national federation of gen- eral workers. Most of the laboi membeiis of the House of Common ;o present. Jacob E. Daubert was born in Shamokin, Pa., on AprU 17, W85. Began playing ball in 1906 with semi-pro club. Joined Marion tne following season. Went to Cleve- land in .spinir of 1908. but was sold to Nashville in May. The next year he went to Toledo. Was then secured by Brooklyn, which club he joined in 1910, becoming regular first base- man at' once. For nine years be played first for Brooklyn. Last wm- terlie obtained by the Reds frow Brooklyn.   

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