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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - September 18, 1919, Ada, Oklahoma                             When Better Pictures Are Made "The Will Show of Souls" is "AavisheJ firms DISTRICT VOLUME XVI. NUMBER 161 ADA, OKLAHOMA, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 1919 IUSK CKOWD OX MAIX KXJOY MILK D1SCVSS1ON" OF THK WATEK BONDS LAST X1GHT. Tho bond campaign was closed hist night ut an immense rally of the xmterritied on Main street in front of the Bart Smith Drug Store. The meeting had been advertised as an ami-bond meeting at which K. S. KiulifC was to make a speech in opposition to the bonds. But sides of the proposition wore well represented in the large crow-1 that assembled early in the eveains and remained with patience till mid- night listening to both sides of ihe argument. Tho argument of Mr. Ratliff was HKlHHiTS KKOM WV'UIAL PART- HOS -NOW PLACE THK KSTI- M VTK OK LOSS AT THAT along the same Hues as his speech at Pool's Store in North Aela Tues- day night. He had with him both recommendations of the Benham En- gineering one submit- ted two years ago and the one of ret-ent read from them to substantiate his argument that one contradicts the other. He ar- sueJ that the company made a mis- take in 1917, and for that reason could not be considered infallible now, He answered the attack made on him the previous night concern- ing a contract he had signed as mayor with the Oklahoma Port- land Cement Company, asserting that the contract had been made by Hugh Bennett, that Bennett had made the investigation and had done the figuring, and that he (Rat- lift) had merely signed what Ben- nett recommended. In this he was corroborated by Bennett who made a statement concerning the matter. Mr. Kiuliff. asserted that the adop- tion of 'he bonds would so Increase the burdens ot taxation that within five years there would be an agita- tion to do away with the entire wa- By ilie Assodiucil Press CORPUS CHR1STI, Sept. The death total in Corpus Christ! aad vicinity us a result of Sunday's hurricano and tidal wave stood at 250 today, according to reports, from burial squads. The generally accepted estimate was that the first figures would reach 500, The offi- cial figures issued today shows the following: Corpus Christ! 5-t. White Point 96, Rocita and Portland SO, Port Araiisas 5. Odem and Siuton 11, Ar- ausas Pass and Rockport S. Defi- nite news of the loss of the launch Waldo, with fifteen passengers aboard, was brought here today by a fisherman from Corpus Christi who declared that he saw that boat and another craft gu down in ihe stonu. WILL THE BONDS CARRY? HERE'S A JEW OPINIONS B. Jones: From present indi- cations the bonds will carry 2 to 1. Dr. 1. L. Cummings: From what I understand of the situation my MARKS t LIOAR 'MANY MOOTED POINTS IN THK LEAGUE OP NATIONS COVENANT TO CALIFORNIA. riy tliu Associated Press SAN FRANCISCO, Sept. Replying in a statement today to n list of Questions put to him by a San Francisco' league of nations or- ganization, President Wilson declar- ed that Great. Britain ;could'not out vote the United States in the lea- gue; that foreign, governments could not, under .the .covenant; or- der American troops ab'road; that, the league would have a powerful influence toward the restoration of Shantung to China; that the United States would not be obligated by the much discussed article ten to aid Great. Britain in suppressing a re- volt in Ireland, and that under ar- ticle eleven there would be created a new forum for quest ions of self determination. With regard to the votes given to the members of the league idem said: 'The consideration which led to PLAN' EMPLOYED IS TO BLOW SHXKS UP BY ELECTRICITY IHSTAMOB AWAY Hy i he Assnditiul Press LONDON, (By Ameri- can Navy is having a tremendous task in sweeping the North Sea of the electrical and highly sen- sitive mines they planted there. Ex- plosion by electricity is the 'method now employed. Some were sunk very deep as a submarine could go. Each mine was fitted with anten- nae suspended by floats so that the huge field was not only charged with mines, but had also become a mass of sensitive feelers to explode them. Should a submarine come in contact with an antennae the mine at a short distance away at the end of the antennae would explode. Tlie problem has been to explode thu mines far enough away from the sweeper to insure safety and also to forestall the danger of the explosion h'p 'rTres" ot' a mine :lt a snle distance-causing I another close to the ship "going off." The vessels in sweeping use special the assignment of six votes to the self governing portions of the Brit- ish Km pi re was that they have in effect autonomous self governing states. Their policy in all but for- eign affairs being independent of the control of the British govern- THREE COMMERCIAL LEADERS BENDING EVERY EFFORT TO SPEED rP PRODUCTION AND RECOUP LOSSES By tile Associated Press LONDON, (By by what Is described as perhaps the greatest industrial and trade crisis in the history-of the country, the commercial leaders of Great Britain are 'bending every effort to speed up production, says the American Cham- ber of Commerce in London. One movement undertaken to, head off the difficulties foreseen is an effort to induce the workers to increase production by showing them the "damgerously critical position" in which Great Britain is now placed by the 'balance of trade against her. Tor July, the adverse balance of trade amounted to about 000, according to figures given out by the American Chamber. Imports for that month Increased about while exports increas- HOTH HOUSE AM) SENATK PAK- TICII'ATE. IN EXERCISES OF WELCOME TO THE TUG CHIEF.' By.the Associated Prras WASHINGTON, Sept. gress, on behalf of the nation, to- day extended to Gen. John J. Persh- ing as commander, and through him to his officers and enlisted men of the American Expeditionary Forces, formal expression of the country's gratitude for "their unwavering duty and valor throughout the war." Business in both houses was sus- pended for the day in order that all members might participate in the ceremonies which were arranged as Ihe last formal-function in connec- tion with the welcome home of the commander in chief of the over- seas armies. Both the senate and the house convened early this afternoon and senate members went in a body to the house chamber where the exer- cises began at two o'clock. WEAKENED SHIP, OFKIC' AND QOAGfc AN electric cables several hundred yards', ed only about long. Operation of a system of elec-l The American Chamber points out I trie Appliances prevents the mines ex-j that this discloses a serious situation ploding If the ship strikes an anten-j ulifj says that, while it may seem nap, but when the electric wire touches the antennae it blows the mines up at a safe distance from the boat. Hundreds are being destroyed will carry easily. C. C. Raudel: what result will be close. C. Williams: 1 haven't heard many people express themselves. system in order to reduce taS-'but from what I ation and that some man would run for office on the platform indicat-, 'o 1. Tom King: heard, 1 think the bonds will be beaten 'i ed. 2 to 1 for the bonds At the conclusion of Mr. address there were calls for R. C. Roland and in response lo the calls "Bob" ascended the rostrum and spoke at considerable length. In a humorous vein he attacked Mr. Ratlift's record as mayorand as- serted that Ratliff's only reason tor opposing the bonds was that Rat- liff had not been invited "to do ev- Rat- 's my predition. C. Zorn: The bonds will win nut by at least to 1. Geo. Harrison; From the way ihe bonds will very well for Great Britain to buy from America much more than she sells to Anrerica, that is a "fools paradise" for Americana. The Chamber explains that an ex- cessive adverse balance against Great Britain would force down sterling exchange on New York and compel Great Britain to buy else- where, where exchange is higher. "'The only way out of con- tinues tlie statement of the American Chamber, "is for America to Invest ,____ i" British securities and to buy gen- Unfted mine by fHnc a'shot at it. j erbiisly of British materials and ment. It is not true that the Brit-' method. ish Empire can out vote the United Aside from the danger and tedious- States iu the league of nations, be-1 ness of the task, bud weather is add- in every mutter except the led to the hardships of the American admission of new members no ac-! sailor.a. t.ion can be taken without a unani- About 755 .vessels are employed, uresent judgment is that the bonds mons vote or the representatives: the majority -of them American. Sub- I ._ t l_ _____ ._.____1. .1 U _ 1_ I rr I I 11 H t' I f t 1 Tl fr .of the slates which are members chasers help DJ rounding np drifting 1 believe from for the'consul, so that in nil matters mints that, hove broken from their 'hear on the streets that the1 of action Ihe affirmative vote of i moorings and-sinking or exploding GLASS ORGANIZATION 1 have it figured, avry 1 1-2 to 1. 6. X. Walker: bonds. K. S. Ratlit'f: 1 think it is going j ident said: the equivalent to the united vote of the! representatives of the several or the British Empire. The united j votes of these several parts of the', British Umpire cannot offset or overcome the vote or tho United States." In answer to the question of whether there was anything in the league of nations covenant which might directly or indirectly 1 for on ihi! United StaU'S any obligation' the j to support England in any way in 'case of a revolt in Ireland, the pros-' PIIKM1EK LLOYD GKOIM.K Ijl There is not. The only THB ON (iKOUX to be a close election. K. W. Simpson of the Surprise has! very much in favor of the bonds. 1 feel confident that we shall carry M. Store: 1 thick the sentiment lo'd voted bonds and increased its pop illation from 8.000 to 25.000. He them, called attention to Shawnee and, Sapulpa as examples of cities that Co- bonds for needed ini- j uud suffer in conse-j diience. His speech was full of hu-1 e.nous morons sallies that kept the crowd down, in high good humor. In his rejoinder Mr. .Katliff hand- ed it back to Roland in the same humorous way and defended him- self from Roland's attacks. He re- newed his argument on the con- tradictions in the estimates of the C. of Stevens-Wilson 1 feel like we will carry the bonds by a big majority. 1 don't be- lieve the people of Ada have little h judgment to -turn them guarantee contained in the coven-: ant is against external aggression, and those who framed the covenant were scrupiously careful to inter-, fere in uo way with what they re-. ny THAT RMiLAM) IS MOST IXTRKKSTED goods, that can be used to advan- tage. This would give Great" Britain the wherewithal -to pay for her im- poris from the United States until she builds up her exports to pay for them. If this is not done it is.ob- vious that the United States' ex- ports to Great Britain drop off." To induce increased production, employers are endeavoring to sho-w their employes the need of an ex- pansion in exports which are The classes of the Ada High School met and organized, electing their officers and sponsors. Contra- ry to the general rule they were al- lowed to elect their own sponsors who will instill in the minds of the members of the class much enthusi- asm and spirit in the ensuing year. The following officers and spon- sors .were elected for their respective classes. Arnold Mai- lory, Vice-President Julian Allen, Sec. and Treas. Meaders Jones, Spon- sor, Mrs. Bullock. Don Evans, Vice-President Clarine Roach, Sec and Treas. Thelma Roberts, Sponsor Mrs. Cutlar. Charles Cunning, Vice-President Ay len. Secretary Geraldine "Hale, Treas- Cathcrine Griffeth, Critic Louise DETROIT, Mich., Sept. China's fourfold that is making her aji easy." Japan's imperious, seUisKT a is an- cestry worship; cor- rupt officialdom, quack -doctors and her military party, according to Charles O. Ford, secretary to the Rt. Rev. Charles D. Williams, -Episcopal bishop of Michigan, who has just returned from a tour of Episcopalian missions in China and the Philippines in. company Dr. John W. Wood, head of the foreign department of the. Board of Mis- sions of the Episcopal church. Dr. Wood will make report on --his ob- servations in the Orient at the General Convention of. the Episco- pal church to be held in. this city October 8 to '27. s "By her ancestry worship, China is linked to a dead .says Mr. Ford. "Much of her tillable land is covered with graves; modern prog- ress is arrested by fear of disturb- ing the spirits of the departed. Polygamy and concubinage are per- mitted and even approved lest there be no sons to perform the ceremony of ancestry worship. China's corrupt officials and her military party are grinding down the great mass of the people, di- verting money raised by the peo- ple or borrowed from other nations for their own illegitimate gain. never have I seen such terrible and malignant dis- eases and growths as in rampant, and few are the trained Chinese doctors to combat it. The people generally are at the mercy" of quack doctors, conscienceless Buddhist priests and a multiplicity of ignorant superstitions. One mar- vels at the virility of a nation which loses more than sixty per cent of its children before they are tnree years old! actorized as tho "life blood of sponsor Miss Geneva Ann ish trade." Gordon. At the same time, the American Churchill Chamber says, government_ Itself; T110.nlas_ vice-President Connie 'Hughes, Secretary Mary D. Emery Treasurer, Jack Price, Sponsor Miss running daily a column headed "The Road to Ruin" under which the gnrd as the sacred del rights of sell' of huge outlay of government funds AM) STEAMSHIP analyzed and given publicity. MRX STK1KK V vngineers. Robert Wimbish responded to the insistent calls of the crowd for a speech and delivered a forcible ar- gument in favor of the bonds. He j have confessed that he had not studied the estimates closely but understood the water situation in Ada. partic- ularly -cast of the Katy. He admit- ted that the cosi of water might be increased by ihe bond issue. If so. what of it? must have an ade- quate supply of water no matter what it costs. Many people are now paying taxes to maintain the pres- ent system and are not getting wa- ter. demands that these S. M. Shaw of Shaw's Department Store: I have not talked to any one today who is opposed to the bonds, and I have talked to many. I think they will KO over without a doubt. Ed Gwin of ('.win The bonds will carry, but I have no idea about the majority. I think a ma- jority of the laboring people are for Impending Steel Strike Now Seems To Be Inevitable {'Tiger" of Now a Tired and Wan Old Veteran them. Very few of the voters talked to are against them. ------------------------jr people set paying for. Mr Ratliff ciinio what they are. already QUENTIN WAS SHOT W Spvciiil Sorvico SYRACUSE, X. Y Quentin Roosevelt was shot, by a German firing -squad after he had AyMX'irttt-lJ Pl'rs-; PAKIS.Sept. IS.--- A number deputies are expected to ratify the! treaty wit'h Germany tomorrow night or Saturday at the verv latest. Pre-j mifr Clenienceau will speak tomor- row on the tre-aty, considerable im- portance being attached to his ad- d This morning's newspapers coni- on the. possibility of the (peace conference being transferred to ______ i London. Premier Lloyd George, of 'Great Britain, is said to have urged ilu: 1'rens 'the change on the ground that his PITTSBURGH, Pa., Sept. IS......i country is the One most interested in Fending arrangements for resuming j the future srat.us of Turkish em- their discussions on matters in con- pire. the cosiderntion of which is the arrived here the other day in the steel workers' principal work remaining before the search of peace and quietness. The Premier looked as if he needed rest and i here was nothing suggestive of the "Tiger" as he descended from the dusty automobile which had boi'iit- him from Paris to Thesea. j He appeared old and wan and tired and heaved a sigh of relief as he i sat. on an old wooden bench in ihe! garden of the villa Ruble Cay. VOTK LA TRANCHE, Vendea, France. illy Clenienceau h-id- for his i made a successful landing over tho 'ints and did not meet i- ii oni-ineoH AiHi'i-iam and German r cenerai GCO He advanced as thr proper solution D'odd suaes Army. ro- of the water question the con- demnation of land at tin- falls be- the springs and the Installa- tion of pumps at that point. The crowd seemed to enjoy the speeches from start to finish and ;ipplauded all the speakers gener- ously. Both sides of the question were well presented, all the speak- ers acquitting themselves well. -SOMK POTATOES" E. Armstrong, a young farmer of the Union Valley district, placed the News under sub- stantial obligation to nim this morn- ing by bringing to the office a half-bushel of the finest sweet po- tatoes ever dug out of the valleys of 1'outotoc County. They were ot the famous Nancy Hall variety and four of them comfortably 'filled a peck measure. Mr. Armstrong has 1 1-2 s of ilieac potatoes from which will gather 3550 bushels. He brought a load of his potatoes to this morning and sold them in a very short time for a bushel. tlred, of Enfield, Ohio. Photographs taken by an official German photographer and sold by him to American officers with the army of occupation vouch for the veracity of the story told by German soldiers claimed to have witnessed the incident. "Quentin Roosevelt, was shot by German troops upon making a safe landing ia an airplane near a boche camp, according to the German i photographer's Captain Dodd hustling I said. I talked with Germans who saw nectioti strike called for next Monday, the conference. national committee for the organi-! i ziition of iron and steel workers is-: i sued a statement to the effect, that having failed to obtain a conference i I with the United States Steel Coi1- j poraiioti, the last and only avail- able, hope is to strike until such j time as the corporation will meet the I representatives of Ihe men. The statement says in part: "In his letter of Sept. llith Judge Gary avers tbat he had two reasons iu mind when he refused lo meet with the American Federation of Labor committee which called upon him recently requesting a confer- ence for ihe purpose of presenting the grievance of his employees. did not. believe that the committee was authorized to speak tor the majority of the employees. "Second, a conference with th.c committee would have been treated; by them as a recognition of the i By Ihe' Associated Preftl LOUISVILLE, Ky.. Sept. hundred thousand railway and steamship men, members of the Brotherhood ot Railway and Steam- ship Express and Station Employees, have been ordered to take a strike vote it was announced here today by J. J. Forrester, of Cincinnati, O-'hio, president of the brotherhood i lo enforce demands made to the '.railway administration by the brotherhood on Aug. IS. Members of tlie organization on the Pennsyl- vania Railway System, it was de- clared, will act within the next few days. M1CKIESAYS closed sliop method of employment. "If these are the real reasons ac- tliming Judge Gary, surely they are not. sufficient to plunge the indus- try into 11 great, labor conflict." I.ISTIW FOR GAUKAKI.'S TftUMPET. lie If tlie bomls carry tlie re hlm come down after being separat-! snit W-III bo made known by the ed from a formation of American of Hie 1'ire nliimi. The ;lveu as soon us the into the midst of in counted and the result an- topi jured Boldiers." Mrs. J. T. ju Brooks of Chaffe, Mo., is the guest of Mrs. I McNair. Mr Brooks is euperintendent of the you inny know that tlio bonds hnvr uoiiiiccil. If you hear the alarm evening you "my know Unit tho have carried. If you Uo not lieur Hie lire alarm Oils evening, wiped the perrpjraiion from his brow and enjoyed the ocean The premier does not like pub- lic functions and probably the only i one of the past months, j ing ilioso of Uic retrlevemwnt nf .v-l- sace-Lorraine, at which he'did not appear bored was the Victory Day -nde. He lias lost, none good humor, however, and when a-lcod how he had er.jyed the trip fi-o-n I he capital, replied: "Somewhat tiresome but the conn-I penitentiary is set for Sept. 27. try is so beautiful. Yesterday we vis-, iied several chut.eaux on the Loire. I c, G. Anderson and J. W. Brown, EMMA GOLDMAN MAY SOOliJE DEPORTED I3y tho Pi-oaf ST. LOUIS, Sept. became known today that a warrant for the deportation of Emma Goldman was served on her last Friday in the Jef- ferson City penitentiary where she has finished serving a two years sen- tence for attempting to obstruct the army draft. .Her release from the "China's religions are Confucian- ism and Buddhism. The first has lit- tle hold upon any but the educated classes. second degenerates in- to a vast organization of-g-raft for its priesthood who prey upon ignor- ance and superstition. Today Bud- dhism seems losing its hold upon the Chinese. There, are many tem- ples, but except during the Chinese New Year and certain festival per- iods they seem not to be generally attended. "Amidst such conditions, Chris- tian missionaries in China are wield- ing an influence in China which is going to play an important part in the future of the East. "Often in whole provinces one finds every Chinese school closed for lack of funds or teachers. To ev- ery mission, large or small, are at- tached day schools for boys and girls. In the larger centers of pop- ulation are schools corresponding 10 i.lie American grammar, high and preparatory schools. And in such cities as Shanghai, Wuchang, Pekiu nnd Nanking, one finds great Chris- tian universities with English as well as Chinese courses which are turning out the men who are des- tinued to become .the leaders of the new China. "The women the church is send- I ing to China are beginning to j touch the lives of the Chinese wo- men. They aro giving instruction in iivgiene nnd sanitation, in the care and diet of the children. "When one sees the crowds who throng the dispensaries- of the Christian hospitals, the terrible and loathsome growths and diseases with which they-are afflicted, the absence of even the simplest ideas of .sanitation and decency, the damp, dark, dirty, ill-veatilated houses, the narrow, crowded, often wholly sunless streets, the tortures to which the poor people are subjected by ignorant quack doctors, one real- the great service medical mis- sionaries are rendering." 1 should have enjoyed greatly hav- npf a lit.tle sleep at Nantes but (lie crowd, after midnight, commenced lo acclaim 'and cheer under my windows ut tin; Central hotel. What a funny idiu." __ Accompanied by a couple oC j weaiher-beaten fishermen, the Pre- r o[ France went for a stroll i along the beach, speaking with thorn m the dialect of the province. WfLSOX PROTESTS AGAINST ORGANIZATION OF POLICE By tho AnBoclivtol Press Sept. dent Wilson, In a telegram sent l'i-o.-n California and received here by the local city-government, said that the organization'of the police forces of the country for the purpose of president and vice-president, re- spectively, of the Nu-Mex Oil com- pany, returned this morning to Por- tales, in order to be there to-su- pervise the putting down of the machinery for drilling. The tools have been on the way for some time and will no doubt be on the premises when they reach that point. Messrs. Anderson and Brown are very enthusiastic over the oil situa- lion at that locality and state that i Portales Js no doubt one of the comlns oil centers of the mid-west. These men showed their patriotism as Ada citizens by continuing their visit longer than they had intended to in order to vote for the bond issue. Chaffe Division of the St. L S. F. fjifled. and makes frequent visits of 'bUBiness importance to tills city. Showers tonight and Friday. Cool-j bringing pressure against 'the pnb- -oortions Fri- He should not be countenanced, or Lot a Want Ad sell it tor you. day. in north nnd portions Fri- permitted." Mr, and Mrs.: Earl Williams re- turned tills morning froni an over- land trip to Colorado Springs, Colo., where they have spent two very plea- sant weeks. On Government Insurance Ada, Oklahoma, Sept. 18, 1919 Ada. News, Ada, Oklahoma. I have a. limited 'supply of Appli- cations for Reinstatement of War Risk Yearly Renewable Insurance, Premium Rate Books for Govern- ment Life Insurance, (This covers all policies written by the Govern- ment, the new and old.) and appli- cations for Conversion of Govern- ment War Risk Insurance. I have had several requests for these forms -before they receiv- ed and if those wanting these will at the Post Office they may procure them and I will gladly assist in fill- ing out the applications, and give any information that I can concern- in.g those. P. LEE, Ass't P. M. Bring youi ciean cotton rags to the Ada News office. We will pay you 3c a pound.   

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