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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: September 11, 1919 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - September 11, 1919, Ada, Oklahoma                             You Would See the Most Wonderful Photoplay of the Age Go of the Apes" American Theatre Today and Tomorrow STIIIS DISTRICT 6 RETURNS VOLUME XVI. NUMBER 155 ADA, OKLAHOMA, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 1919 THREE CENTS THE COPY KUOM A1J, PARTS OK THE I' S TO ESTABLISH "SlttXI- HATTH." NEAR CITY. By thv SAN FRANCISCO, Koniauy tribes, commonly known as "Gypsies." t ravelins toward Cal- ifornia from all parts of the United States with the avowed purpose of establishing a or per- manent sacred encampment at Em- eryville, across the bay from San Francisco, officials of .the east bay cities believe. In possession of the tribal lead- ers, who came to the coast TO attend the recent marriage of George Adams, head of one tribe, and Mary, who said she was an Egyptian princess, were found tele- grams from headquarters of six tribes scattered throughout the Minority Report On League Put Up To Senate Today Hy the WASHINGTON, Sept. tion of the peace treaty w.ith the league of nations covenant, or the adoption ol amendments, would mean the sacrifice by the United States of all the concessions obtain- ed from Germany under a dictated peace, minority members of the! foreign relations couvmittee declared In a report presented to the senate. The report, prepared by Senator Hitchcock of Nebraska, ranking dem- ocrat of the committee, urged speedy ratification of tho treaty w-ithout amendments or reservations. The report deplores "the long and un- necessary delay to which the treaty has bet'ii subjected while locked in the committee whose reconmienda- Uons were from the start a foregone and it is suggested that these recommendations could have been made in July. Senator Shields, democrat, of Ten- nessee, did not sign I he report, hav- ing announced that he favored the! reservations to the league covenant! country. These contained but two words. "Amen or "We come." They were said to be replies to a country-wide call for the gath- ering of the gypsy clans. Not all of the gypsies are included in the movement. The response is confined to the more religious ele- ement still cling to the tra- dition That one day they would take the road to the land of promise by "the great water." the ultimate home ENROLLMENT AT MiOVE THE AVERAGE. URG- ED TO ATTEND SVNHAY SCHOOL. Chapel exercises were held at the Normal this morning for the first time of the present term. Almost three hundred students assembled, being one of the most promising openings of the school for the last decade. The students are more ma- ture than have been in the past, indicating, so the authorities say, that the local schools are do- ing better work and irre sending students to the Normal only after they have been graduated from their local high schools. The devotional exercises' this morning were conducted by Rev. C. V. Dn-nn of the Christian church. Miss Kitten, the new piano in1 prepared by chairman Lodge. It wasj several piano so- J V. Vint los, which were enthusiastically re- ceived. Miss Kittell comes with a stri'.ig of musical successes in of The Coast. wanderers on the Pacific Fifteen thousand men, and women and their boys and girls, are esti- mated Lesko to be on their here. Amenja. head of a Greek gypsy band, and others, have made inquiries as to state laws on muni- stated, however, that he would not present a separate report. The other senators signing the minority report in addition to Senator Hitchcock were Williams of Miss., Swauson of Virginia, Pomereue of Ohio, Smith of Arizona and Pittman of Nevada, all democrats. The minority report den-led her Prof. M. L. Perkins appealed to the students to become identified with one of the Sunday schools, of nit- city and thus improve them- lines as well as the purely academic The People of Key West Survey the Storm Wreckage By tho Ast.ooi.ucd PI-CFS JJ Full Weights and i Measures Will HelpCutH.C.ofL KEY WEST, Fla., Sept. MAyOu ASKS ALL CITIZENS XO VISIT THE FAIR GROUNDS AM) VIEW THE DIFFER- ENT EXHIBITS. la cutting the high cost of living one of the important points that COXsiDKRED A HARD RATION daylight today, following the storm of yesterday and a night of dark- ness, the people ot Key West and surrounding territory were able for the first time to survey des- the consumer must Insist upon withj food, fuel and .textile merchants is a fair system of weights and measures. The United States bureau of standards has established certain FOR SOLDIERS IN EMERG- ENCIES NOW EATEN BY CHILDREN. Recognizing -the importance of standards ot weight, measurement, truction wrought by the hurricane, Pontotoc County Katr and desiring! time, etc., by which all other ineas- that swept through here Tuesday night. Not a house in the city es-i caped damage, and many were totally wrecked. The harbor presents a tan- gled of fishing vessels and citizens of Ada contribute; ures are gauged and corrected. In the addition each state determines for nis: itself certain regulations of weights measures to govern the sale of t Isil x-ir> h i VL ft QI a Hniinna T1OG ki ination: Mayor's Proclamation. other small craft, but the latest re- Th 'b fah, held jn Pollto. toc county is now open at the .fair other failed than the articles within state boundaries. Each housewife should familiarize herself with the regulations in her state, should supply herself with a the 'harbor dredge Grampus. ivers lost, o'1, at Ada Th0 best exhibits reliable scale for weighing purchas- ever collected in ithis county are be-' es, and then, keep a careful eye er co The British tanker Tonawanda, visitors, and the col-! upon her purchases to see that deal- ho, _.._ which had broken her moorings, was reported not in bad condition. In addition to the temporary stop- page of electric service telephone service was suspended and newspapers were forced to suspend publication. A wirelrss message received here curly t'hls morning said that forty- fivp persons were adrift off the coa-st about fifteen miles from Mi- ami. All wir-.-e reported in distress and without I'ooti and water. Boats have left ht-re to bring them in. lines. President J. M. Gordon told of rue icyuii ueii-JCU claim Put forth in Chairman selves along _ report that the peace conference still was in session and has power to bring the German representatives! again to Paris, declaring that such the arrangements which have been power had been exhausted and that made for the special tram to Okla- Germany "had closed the chapter! homa City two weeks from Friday in by signing and ratifying the order that the students may meet the amended treaty is not; president Wilson. The train will __ signed by Germany." the minority' leave here early in the morning :ind Iceneral K. M. VanZnndt. commander LUTHER HARRISON 10 SPEAK Hy ilu FT. WORTH. Texas, Sept. cipal organization and the j report added, "then it is not binding; wlll return thai on her." 'dent Wilson has of Knu-ryvilie. who are said to be Tht, mentioned twelve con- tares-! on the Peace Treaty and the! apprehensive that the gypsies willj cesgions tne united States would lose! Lpa K110 Or aNtions. it is lit night, after Presi-jof' ,be ec as delivered his ad- announced today onfederate Veterans, that he had sulcci- lection of these exhibitions repre- sents a great deal of trouble and ex- pense on the pant of the fair man- agement and of the different ex- hibitors. The splendid array of livestock, agricultural, and other exhibits, il- lustrates in a wonderful way the possibilities of Pontotoc county. It is weJl for all citizens to visit the fair and witness the fine products of the county for the present year. It will be gratifying for tnem to under- stand the substantial progress made by t'his county along the lines In- dicated by the.various exhibits. The material prosperity of Ada as a city is closely joined with the development and prosperity of our livestock and agricultural interests. It therefore becomes the duty of conformlng tO State Laws differ in each state, but the standards adopted in Chicago are fairly typical. For Instance there Is a standard for bread to which all bakers must conform. A light- weight loaf should be reported at once to the local department of weights and measures, or to the state department that the consum- er may be protected against short weights. In Chicago, a one-pound loaf is By News' Special NEW YORK, Sept. children in other war torn countries of Europe are grate- fully eating Ijardtack 'to assuage their almost constant hunger. Hardtack to the average Ameri- can vaguely associated with stren- uous campaigns as an emergency ra- tion for soldiers and sailors, cer- tainly not as food for little chil dren. Yet, the mere fact that tht hard, unsalted, kiln-dried crackers were placed at distributing points, attracted double the usual number of small folks, according to Dr. Boris D. Bogen, head of American Jewish Relief work in Poland, in a, report, made public here today by the American Jewish Relief Com- mittee. "This, however, does not tell the said Dr. Bogen. "One must see the hundreds and hundreds of children gathered at the doors of the stations and K) encourage in every possible those whose industry nas the standard. Each loaf must .have eager, hungry faces. I do not un- affixed to it a label, 1 inch square, demand how people, anywhere, can stating the weight of the loaf and; be quiet and content, when thou- the name of the baker of manufac-j sands of little children are con- turor. Those selling bread must tinuously hungry." weigh it in the presence of 6he pur-i Dr. Bogen referred specifically to chaser if requested to do so. conditions in Poland to the of The standards for milk and cream! the Bug River where automobiles require thai the cover or cap of, trucks are being used to transfer: every bottle must bear in indelible hardtack and condensed milk, to the letters the name of the person on children. "iiuse IUUUOLIJ :ma c.i.'-i.' LIU, UU..UI. M--------- f .1. brought about the present develop-: firm bottling the milk and must be 1 "The food situation east of mom and who 'have taken the troub- marked with the bottle's exact ca-.; Bug River continues to be desper- le to present their products at iheipacity said he. "I am receiving al- countv lair. have sufficient sludunt ,viu lakoj voting power to take; b lo ratify the treaty, these; tlliU aimopl eve.rv control of the town, now a city of illdudins industrial and economic! opportunity' to hear the Chief tell of the aims and as- ndvantages and agreeuie-nts. bands are reported to have; Reservations proposed iv the ma- tion to this coast are gypsies of the Turkish. Rumanian, Hungarian, Ger- man. Moravian. I.ithunian. Russian. Greek. Bohemian. Italian and Span- ish tribes. SUPREME JUDGE AND U. i ATTORNEY XKW OltLKA.NS WKATHKIt 1U-RKAV REPORTS STORM By the Asdocinuxi Prvsa NEW ORLEANS. Sept. II.-- Northeastern storm warnings were! expected west as far as Morgan City on the Louisiana coast by the local weather bureau today. Norther- year, Many more teachers will be in attendance when the summer schools close. MKXU'AN KAVD1TS OATTUKE THRKK MORK AMK1UCAXS Serviw The resignation of Thomas II. Owen as chief justice of 'the State supreme court is forecast on what is considered good authority and a report from Muskogee. W. r. McGinnis, United States at- torney for the eastern district of Oklahoma, has announced his res- lunation, effective January 1, ac- cording to a Muskogee report, and he will form a partnership with Justice Owen in -this city, it is said. is in Muskogee now and could not be reached to confirm the report. He went to Muskogee Mon-i day-and will not return until Sunday. t It is understood Justice Owen will not leave the bench until next June. Alvin Maloney, an assistant to McCinnis. also will resign January 3. it is said. Justice Owen succeeded Summers Hardy as chief justice about six months ago. If he should resign, a successor will be elected by the jus- tices and a new Justice appointed by the governor. Hy thi- AKsocmteo Pri-aw WASHINGTON. Sept. American embassy at Mexico City ly wmds. it was stated, will in- investlgiUins nll unconfirmed re- crease this afternoon und probably reaching gale proportions in southern Louisiana. No informa- tion had been received here early to- day to determine-the course of the hurricane. port, that three Americans, includ- ing two named Jones and Ferguson, of Tampico, were captured by ban- dits who blew up a train between San Luis Potosi and Tampico. For the foregoing reasons we be-' sell it by avoirdupois weight, and it "ilieve fliai every citizen of Ada should must be weighed at the time of i attend the fair as ni'Uch as possiblet delivery by the delivery man on i in order lo lend encouragement locales adjusted and sealed by the 'persons or firms selling ice must; most daily reports of lack of food in the districts of Vilna, Lida and especially Baranowicz and 'Plnsk. These are the places where we are. now using automobile delivery of management and exhibitors andi inspector weights and-, measures. I hardtack and milk to the little ones. 'to assist in making the present fair por fuel, the driver'or delivery This work has been exceedingly use- i a pronounced success. man must be provided with a ticket Now therefore., I. Gary bearing the name of the seller of Mayor of 'ho City of Ada, do 'hereby the fue] and marked with the net proclaim Friday. September 12, as] weignt of the fuel ordered by the "Ada. Day" at the county fair, and j pllrchaser It the buyer so de-i urge every; citizen of_ Ada to Inlands tne fuel .must ful but unfortunately we did not re- ceive In time all the equipment-for the automobile trucks and -conse- do make a special effort to leave hisjin ilifi presence on a scaie designat- business ;ind duties for a part of; that day at least and visit the grounds by the city inspector of weights quently we are not able to run them all and cover all the territory, reweighed I expect that during the -month of July Jewish children were fed through the medium of the Chil- SKRHIAX PKACIJ DKLKOATIOX BEATING FOR MORE TIME Slat Luther Harrison Who. an Associated Press dispatch j i and measures, making t hi fair ear corn' D0taloes' coa1' 'i success Ml tho clUzens o7 ida1 frullB' and other i are "ctfullv urgci so? Articles sold by dry measure (quart) ia inirt of "Ada Day" to the purpose. Pecl- bushel- 'Shall be sold i> 1 of visiting the fair grounds. heaped measure, according to the Given under my Hand, this the Chicago standards. I ilth day of September, 1919. Ever-v consumer is required to GARY KITCHENS, in full for the goods .he pur- ______ chases and should require from the It was.a late hour last night merchants full weight and measure the last of .the exhibits got by the of the goods bought. secretary of the county fair and reached the display tables or stalls. dren's Relief Bureau." BOYLE WILL RLE PETITION TODAY (THA'l MANY LAST PARIS, Sept. Serbian delegation here advised the peace conference today that because of] the fall of the Belgrade government: it was unable to obtain instructions concerning the signing of the Aus- trian treaty. The delegates sold it woukl have to wait for such in- structions until n new cabinet was formed. an .riess annoiiuce-d today, has been appoint- The number of exhibits was so much; ed to deliver one of the leading ad-1 greater than had been expected that dresses at nhe national convention! the secertary soon found himself. of Confederate Veterans, soon to XUiHT IN RKIUN OK DUE TO LICE STRIKE. liy tiio BOSTON, Sept. today of a young woman, believed to be Miss Margaret Walsh, brought the number of last night's riot vic- tims to live. Tho young woman was shot during the disturbance in the south BOKIOII district where the national guards today fired into a crowd. Another death occurred when Raymond Bayers, of Cam- bridge, tried to escape from the state guards who had rounded up i a group of seventy-five participants Boston. Corn- today wired the secretary of the navy a request that naval troops be held in readi- ness to supply additional troops for Bosto.i. With six regiments of state Odom and George Town-; Buards untjer arms the governor had send were arraigned before Justice j moblllzed ixli the forces at his com- Anderson yesterday on charges Kecond degree forgery They are I Ncar] a gcore.of personSi includ. clmrged jointly with passing a four women were ,njurcd fts a result of the activities of the state Ada on n Building Uoom. The edMor. in company with a. Confederate Veteran 90 years old, rode all over the city of Ada on i the 27th ult. and counted ISO new j 1 th 'lwollines being erected and 17 newi cieain brlck business houses. Ada-seemsi to be on a building SERIOUS RIOTING IS FILED AGAINST TWO i In a dice game on moil. Governor Collldge peddler, the check amounting 0 nollciiiit They were bound over to ln Policing the district court and their bonds were fixed at each. Townsend was arraigned on an- other second degree forgery charge, in this case he charged with pass- the city last night. Success in putting down the rioting and suppressing the looting marked their efforts to a large de- gree, although in some sections the mobs were not put under control. Ing a forged check for on irrria merclwnt at Stonewall, His bond MI.Nfc KILLS In this case was fixed at HIKE; INJURES TEN Neither Odom nor Towneseud had given bond thin morning and are In the county jail. By tho AntiocliLtal Prom1 SAN SALVADOR, Sept. Nine minors were killed and ten in- (jured by the explosion of dynamite Generally fair tonight and Friday in a mine northeast of thla city to- WEATHER FORECAST tiho Information the weather man day. The explosion was gave us today at noon. lightning. .flred by ed State Senator Luther Harrison, of Oklahoma, to be one of the chief orators at the forthcoming reunion at Atlanta.. GIL. Senator Harrison's home is in Ada. BIG PEACE ARMY FLAYED BY WOOD H .took considerable time for to get. thru with the entries. Tho work of judging began :his Creek Herald. By News' Sji< WASHINGTON; sept.-10.- --There Is no necessity for an army of more REPORTKI) AT PIUNK', than peace Major By the AwHociiitcd PI-CMB LONDON, Sept. reports in responsible quarters here tell of serious rioting In Flume be- tween the Italian and troops. The allies were compelled to intervene. The riot is reported to be continuing. ROUMANIAN CABINET FALLS; Ue.m'1-al Loonard Wood declared this afternoon before the military affairs committee of the senate. He was speaking upon the army re-organiza- tion plan, proposed' by the war de- partment and providing for an army of more than half a million men. "Universal training should be morning at 11 o'clock. The first line of exhibits to pass before the judges was the hogs. The other live stock I is being judged .this afternoon. The first rticps w-ere pulled off according to program this afternoon. The tractor show in the stubble- field just, south of the fair grounds is attracting considerable attention. Numerous tractors are plowing up t'he stubble and showing yhat ma- chinery can do on the farm. Some ot the tractors exhibited are of baby size, but pull plows along as if many mules were ahead of the plows. Among the school exhibits that from Homer is attracting attention. The different articles In this exhibit are displayed in a most artistic manner and present a handsome ap- pearance. Some of the school ex- hibits altho containing 'many fancy articles are uot arranged in a man- ner to get the best effect. There was much disappointment among the fans when it was learned tha't the 'three-game series between Allen and Henrye-tta had been called made a part of our military policy j off. For some reason Henryetta and once in it would be pos- 1 could not play the game and the rALLS' ium uuce JU luiue IL wumu uc yuo i LUC viic NEW ONE BEING! FORMED I slble to reduce the regular series has been cancelled. The fans urtnrt.i evnAf111 nif vprv By Special Service OKLAHOMA CITY, Sept. Boyle, state mine an- nounced yesterday that he will file with the secertary of state today a copy of his petition for submission of a constitutional amendment to place oil and gas conservation reg- ulations back in his department. The gist of the amendment, as stated in the petition which Boyle will file, is: The gist of the proposition is to amend section 25 of Article VI of the state constitution to be known i as section 15 of said article, provid- ing that the chief mine inspector 'shall have the exclusive power and. 1 it his duty to enforce all I laws in regard .to mines and min- CHICKASHA, Okla., Sept. ing and the drilling for oil or Responding to an emergency call, and tne Conservation of these nat- MEN RESPOND TO CALL' A XI) STREET CAU SERVICE I IS RESUMED AT i CHICKASHA. four carmen, returned to work. on the Chickasha street railway this ural resources and the inspection of refined products of petroleum. morning and operation of the caftland conferring exclusive jurisdic- was resumed at 12 o'clock today. Uon Qf all such mauers upoa, the The men returned to work with the understanding that the Chicka- sha chamber of commerce would ex- ert every influence to bring about a settlement satisfactory to both the strikers and the company. It ar- rangements are not made within ten days, which will be after the open- Ing of the state college "for women and the Grady 'county free fair, the carmen are at liberty to quit, ac- cording to the agreement with the chamber of commerce, which Issued the emergency call. By tho Axsocljltcd VIENNA, Sept, cabinet of Premier Bretiauo, In Roumaula, according to unofficial reports which reached Vienna from Buchar- est today has fallen. Take Joneacu is said to be forming a new cabi-' net General Wood said. "We should pre-! had been expecting three very pare and hold in reserve supplies citing games and are sorely chief mine inspector, aud prohibit- ing the legislature from transferring any of such duties to any other agency of the state government. MESSAGE PROM McKEOWN TO CHARLKS L. ORR Mr: Chas. L. Orr, Ada, Okla, My Dear.Sir and Friend: I have mailed you under separate cover a bunch of bills and Informa- Mon regarding the soldiers, and trust you receive them in time for the meeting on the 13th inst. With sincere good wishes to you and all the boys, I am, Your'friend, TO-.! D. and equipment for a force of four million men." General Wood advo- cates an independent air service, a small tank corps, and increases In coast, defenses. An officers' reserve pointed that Henryetta has seen fit to renege. All space reserved for the Boys' Endurance Teit. n ill-others, seven and nine, were "iiiir.'i'llng dally, and It seemed 'that Hie little one always commenced the be maintained, General Wood'1 said. We should build up our reserves and reduce our regular army." CA-PTClBB OF THEIR OPPONENTS fly tho ARwitiimwl. PIVHK LONDON, Sept. Bolshevik wireless dispatch from Mekow to- day claims the capture nearly twelve ;.housa.nd prisoners" from Ad- miral Kolehak's a.11 Russian forces in the region of Aktubln-Skorsk. 'It ia declared that tho remainder of Kolsha'k'H southern army is expect- ed to surrender. t l-U 1 _ Club exhibits at the fair have beenl "lss- !lhvn-vs got the.worst of It taken and full exhibits are on fried over It. When asked why There are thirteen departments j hp "fiir'tod ihlngs when he knew he of, the boys' club work and everyj net hurt, the little fellow re-' department is represented at the pllod: "Well, I made up my mind a fajr. This means that twenty-sixj long time ago that some day -I was. go- ,._ ...._ _ __ LLllD1 Pontotoc county lads Will attend thej In? to lie hlg enough to whip brother. I the organization. suite fairs at -Oklahoma City and! ,un i going to know when I FEATHERS FOR PROFITEERS By Special Sept. coat i of tar and feathers or the whip- ping post is threatened for profit- i eers in a. "proclamation" received, today by a local newspaper, signed by "vigilantes of Dallas." Alleged real profiteering will be Investigat- ed first, it Is stated. Identity of the Is 'not known pub- licly and this Is .the first "heard of am If I don't try it every day to Muskogee. The winner of the First prize In! each department is a free trip to the fair at Oklahoma Hindu children-are remarkable for those wiho win second prize their precocity. Many of them are SCOTLAND'S LABOR FORCES AGAINST DIRECT ACTION By the AnDocIiUod Frou GLASGOW, Sept. a corn- receive a free trip to Muskogee. skilled wortanen at an age when] paratively close vote, the, trades The exhibits entered by the clubs! the children of other nations are union council in session here to- at .the county fair are among the learning the alphabet, A hoy of seven I day voted a resolution very best shown. ,__ Saturday will be may be a skilled while claring against the principle of dl- "Soldiers and some of the 'handsomest rugs are rect action. The vote was Sailors' Day" at Che fair, according] voven by children not yet in their against the resolution and (Continued on Page Eight.) teens. in favor ot it.   

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