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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - August 20, 1919, Ada, Oklahoma                             YOU'ME XVI. NUMBER'137 ADA, OKLAHOMA. WEDNESDAY, AUGUST au, Army Is Now Pursuing Bandits; Fight Coming FIRST STATE OWED FLOUR MILL FOR K. 0. BITTERLY OF V. S. CHAMEK OUTLINED KK- FORE OOMSnTTEK. return of the railroads of the coun- try to private operation as soon as remedial legislation can be enacted, Geore W. Post of New York, chair- man of tho railroad committed of the chamber of commerce of the United States yesterday presented the chamber's railroads plan to interstate commerce commit- tee. There is manis'est throughout the coutry. a "'strong, even over- whelming' sentiment against contin- uance oi' federal control and oper- ation" said Mr. Post, "due to the unfavorable impression made by the operation of railroads under tea- oral control." The program for government own- BISMARK. N. D-. Aug. toward providing North Dakota with, its first state-owned flour mill under j the Non-Partisan League, program was taken here recently when the I industrial commission, which will di- rect the 'operation of all state own- ed industries under the League plan.j authorized J. A. McGovorn, manager of the Mill ami Elevator Associat-, ion, to make a contract for the pur-; chase of the flonr mill at Drake. I The mill has a capacity of 150 bar-; McGovern also was instructed to plan for the establishment of the state's terminal flour mill and ele-1 vator, construction of which is ex- pected to be started next spring. The industrial commission plans- to use the Drake mill as the basis, for the state organization, accord-; ins; to Oliver S. Morris, secretary of; and to Government Will Assume Offensive Attitude Toward Mexico from Now On, According to Information Received from Washington COMMISSION AFTER OF BANDITS FIRST j WORK1XG OUT OP POLICY j TO BE PURSUED BY THE OOYF.RXMEXT. LAW REPEALED OKI VETO new produce house will open for business In Ada the last" of the week. This will be the "Dandridge-1 JKerr Produce composed of Ada men and only recently or- ganized. The company has leased i the building on West 12th Street for- merly occupied by the Ada Star- Democrat and expect to open lor business last of the week. The Dandridge-Kerr company is composed of T. O. Dandridge, Robert S Kerr and Fred Guinn, all of whom are well know in Ada. Th_ey have formed connections with some of the Prak. mill will "whell tho industrial com-; Mr. McGovern's contract OKLAHOMA CITY. Aug. 20. Oscar Thraves, of the legal depart- ment of the state corporation com- is at Lawton conferring with thresher men and grain pro dticers relative to a number or complaints from Comanche county of discrimination. The complaints Inve the usual trend, that threshers will make a stand on a farm where then- is a large grain crop and then mcnv several miles away, ig- noring the requests of producers Post. "Groups of business men difter in the details of -plans for the rial- ho said, "but in one thing they" will be found in firm agree- ment: Government ownership must not prevail." Havnc the indorommt of tno MAKFA. Tex.. Aus. j federal troops are co-operating with troops in .Mexico, accord-! ing tc a message received by Colonel j Lanshorne today from the Mexican 1 ut Presidio, who reported ,-ollows: ownership cind op oraton with comprohonsiv, .ate rates affec.tin, interstate com-, -Railroad companies to become ft-deraiized. the states to retain tax- of .1 federal transpor-' tution U-K threatened io brins threshers In lore tho commission on such com- plaints but in nearly every instance the relief has been secured without; further action than a request from the commission. The Comanche county situation was said to bo becoming desperate and It was thought best to have a representa- tive upon the ground and see if the, producers could not be secured the relief for which they hntl petition-] ed the commission. Two and a Half Tons Opium to Detroit Yearly MARFA. Tex., Aug. where in Mexico, opposite Candela- ria. Texas. American soldiers early, today continued in their pursuit be- gun yesterday 01 bandits who cap-j Hired and held for ransom Lieuten-] Peterson and Davis. Military! quarters heiv were without infor-; mation from the punitive Heavy storms in the mountains oC Chihuahua interrupting communica-, lion via army field telephones. Two of the expedition ...jht. with bullet holes Of their machines, and report- ed being attacked b ybandit gang ofi three Mexicans, one believed they killed sun bullets Hy Uio Associutixl Frews WASHINGTON, Aug. of the daylight saving act was ac- complished today, the senate voting fifty-seven to nineteen to sustain tne house in passing the repeal measure yesterday over the president's veto OP PRICE GUARANTEE CAUSE OF REDUCTION SAYS F. X. GRAY, COTTON EXPERT. By the Associated Press HOUSTON, Tex., Aug. acreage under cultivation in Texas Is 10 per cent less than at the cor- responding period last year, accord- r __ 1-1 _.__. formed connections with some or tne largest produce houses of the south-) Ing to P. N. Gray west and will be prepared to han- the die produce in any quantities. They will also be in the market to buy and sell all kinds produce and specialist in the reau at Houston. b The total acreage under cultiva- tion in was estimated at wl'li announcement of j compared with their plans presently. pi-anted acres last-year. Based on a condition of 65 per cent of normal. it indicates a yield of 134 pounds of lint cotton per acre, Mr. Gra> de- machine Aug. and depre bandits directly across] the border will in the future bring j the United States armed forces upon the marauders, according to evidence i of the United States future policy from official sources today. The-pres-; punitive expedition, led by Major General Joseph T. DicSman, consU-, lutes' the first working out of new, policv which one official character-. "handling tho border nui-j .FOUR RESERVATIONS MADE IN' NEW Be tin- Ass-eclated PreM WASHINGTON, Aug. reservations, similar to those recent- ly proposed by a group of seven senators, and dealing with with- drawal from the League of Nations, of atticle ten of the League coven- ant domestic questions and the Monroe Doctrine, are embodied in separate resolution prepared today by Senator Pittman of Nevada, Dem- ocratic member of the foreign rela- tions committee. Pittman said tho had not been present- ed to the president. CLOSE'CHICAGO THEATERS JBy tho Associated Press CHICAGO, Aug. strike of (stage hands and musicians as an adjunct to the actors' strike throat- ens to close every play house in Chi- cago tonight. If threats are carried out only photoplay and vaudeville houses will be in operation. Penny to K. Street Car Bj Associated Press LONDON. Aug-. transport, Shijika Maru, struck a rock and foundered August south of Sanegashtma, according to a Napazaki dispatch received by Lloyds. One hundred and. ten on board are reported missing. Miss Edna Stokes has return-ed from her summer's vacation in the I Ozark mountains and was acom- panied home by her .mother, total crop if equiva- 500 pound gross -weight bales. .the usual- 1 per cent for ___ was Mr, Gray's prediction based on July reports. Last year's production was 804 bales. There would have been less re- duction in acreage" Mr Gray de- for the Hnnitat. ciwiuucd by almost conUnupu! very unusual in June. While reasons are ascribed for the reduc- lContinued on r'ase )S FAIR Ij. B. Gilstrap and family, 120 West Fifteenth. R1Tf Arden L. Bullock has been ap- pointed chairman of the Fair Price Committee of Pontotoc County to succeed Busby, who has re- signed. Having been chair- man of the new county council of defe-o jt-ibi- Busby found himself unable to act in both capacities and resigned his position with the Fair Price Committee. WIVES OF ALIEN NOBLEMEN FEEL POVERTY PINCH IN SWITZERLAND tin- AB-l'i-ialwl j DETROIT. Mich., Aug. 20.--TWO and one-half tons of opium is eacn year brought into the city of Detroit "and most of it is -to uses according to lhe federal au- Detro'i't has 40.000 drug addicts, i; lias been estimated, and city of- ilcials are' being urged to establish municipal institution where they may be treated and cured if possible, I'm-' questioning has brought out. the fad that n very large proportion of .the victims acquire their drug habit .through association "vllh other :id- Detroil, it is paid, is the third largest opium importing center in i LHP" Unil'.Ml States, the major por- 'lion of the drug coming in from Canada and Mexico, and the police 'declare the "underground railway" 'over 'he traffic is handled in lhe main is operated by a drug snuiKgliniJ that, is na- tion-wide. Not more than 10 por cent of the opium 'brought into t.his city is used in prescriptions and patent n-.edi- cines it has been stated, 00 per cent ior more -being used for illegal pur- i poses. .Medicine manufacturers here, I investigation has shown use very lit- Itle of the drug in their prepara- 1 Among the facts brought out by local investigations into the use of opium is thai Americans, native, .lead all other nationalities in its Illegitimate use. P1UNT INDUSTRY I TO BE INVESTIGATED have resigned as chairman of, 'the Fn'ir Price Commiteo of Pon-j toioc county for the reason 'hat, as County Judge, I have been appointed1 chairman of the new county council V defend to be reorganized at once., I do not that I could do justice to both positions, as chairman of the' 'Fair Price Corn-millet" anil as Chair-. man of the County Council of UP-. fi-iiM- of this oouuiy. "Th- Kair t'riof- Committee has been well organized and is a com- mitu-e composed of some ol the and most patriotic citi- of this county, who are already, Ut work toward reducing: the 'cost of living. Thf-y are sincere in their purpose and will accomplish: results. They should have tho hear-, liest co-operation and support or. every citizen in IV." is 7 cents now." I This morning Kansas City began, paying increased street car fares; and She request of the conductor for, penny" caused many a' Kansas Citian to "break" anoth- er 5-cent piece to meet the rising, cost of street car transportation. Delays were frequent owing to the, tiiiio'ounsumed in making change at' coiifn-sted corners. Never before were pennies in such demand, it was said, and the future of the tank" is declared to hp gloomy. increase of 1 cent in the fare is a step to the S- which recently was the Missouri public ser- vice commission. The S-cent charge wns to hnve become effective today hy ilu- traction company, after se- rnrhm the sanction of pom- mission, announced a 7-CeiU fare until the public had opportunity io purchase the now S-cent tickets. A.IH! ii cost more Io take the children along, too. Half fare tick- ets vero sold by the conductors at four for IP cents, or n cash fare of -1 cents each. t car cent fare O O OO O W A. Cease is hero and in arrosant colors for the tom in K of the V. C. V.'s. American land Confederate flau-s and gay orcd 'banners are hanging promis- ctiously from lhe wires over the bus I ness part of the city, hailing with joy the pventCul date for the reunion :iiml extending a glad welcome to tho old veterans who will be here O THIS o Tho mayor of the city has v designated next Friday as c'.raii-up day. Let us make it all th.it the term implies. In the first place the old O veterans will be with us next week and we should do all in O our -power'to have the city of Croy abroad state that many of the- wrd to alien noblemen are feel- American iifiruitaca trt wcu ty aucn inf the pinch of poverty in Switzerland. Many ol tnem aie Mng: iri usion in the IHtle republic awaiting help from imencun relatives. Among those said to be living moderate- Iv in Switzerland is the Duchess of Croy, formerly the beau- tffuf Nancv Leishman, of Pittsburgh. Her marriage to the voung Duke of Croy in October, 1913, near Geneva created a sensation. The marriage was. opposed by the family of the Duke, who risked social ostracism for, himself and his wife by mam-ing the American girl., The family later with- drew the opposition to the marriage. WASHINGTON, Aug. gallon of tho news print paper In- dustry to determine whether it is engaged in illegal practices, and whether prices are excessive, was au- thorized in a resolution introduced by Senator Reed of Missouri, ana adopted by the senate today. Mr W. A Cease is located in 'the vacant building just west oE the Blankeuship-Cumminss Undertaking parlor. He has an extraordinary line of of lhe weeds. gh and o p of advertising than to have a O clean town when our visitors O come. O In the next place the busy O By Awwiclateil PARIS, Aug. mili- tary authorities are preparing for an offensive east of Dneister river for the purpose of joining General Deneklnes, Anti-bolshevik forces are now in southern Russia according to the Echo de Paris. uu-ui-fce of the greater part of the decoration at Tulea last year at the National reunion the U. C. s. WEATHER FORECAST Partly cloudy tonight am a to- morrow. Sbxrtrere in the extreme west portion of state. O should not be allowed to rot O on -the premises, as such filth O o breeds disease. 10 Spending a little time now O 1 O cleaning up your place and you O O will not have to spend so much O C? for doctor bills this winter. O O 0 0 0 O O O OO O O O O O 0 O Let's Be Good to the Old Soldiers Next Tuesday Wednesday and Thursday Ada will be host to the Confederate Veterans of the This is probably the last time this city will be "OIloied as the meeting place of the state reunion Vf y raPidb now are the ranks of the old heroes of the earlj thinning-, and within a few short years the of Sose troublous days will be lowered beneatn the sod. In view of these facts, can we.do too much for them o-i the occasion of their state reunion? Can we. in fact, do enough for them on this auspicious asion? We think not, but we can do our best, and we believs A.dn will not be content with doing less. Everv business house in the city should be Properly deco-atcd on this occasion. It is by no means unappro- pr ate to display the colors of the Confederacy, when d S laved in company with the stars and stripes. It is onlv a recognition of the respect we have for those who fought in a cause they believed to be just. _ It is also the duty of every citizen to get his business and his work in such shape as to give the old veteran, J part of- their time. All persons who own cars should place them and a driver at the disposal of the visitor at certain hours during each day. Proper arrangements should, and we are sure be. made for the accommodation of all guests m the mattei of eating and sleeping quarters. Every person should wear-their best and go ou tell others about it wherever they Every small boy and girl should make a point to never done things by halves in the past. We acquit ourselves so they may noi-nnjf praise for Ada and her people. It will be a 'small matter for our people to do these the city.   

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