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Ada Evening News: Wednesday, August 20, 1919 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News (Newspaper) - August 20, 1919, Ada, Oklahoma                                 If You Want to See  with Your Own Eyes the World's Greatest and Latest Current Events See International News at American Today *  VOI.I MI-' XVI. NUMBER 137  ADA, OKLAHOMA, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 20, 1919  THREE CENTS THE COPY  merican Army Is Now Pursuing  Mexican Bandits; Fight Coming  PLUMB PROPOSAL  ATTA! 'KKD—PAX OF V. * FRAMER OITUXED BK-FORE COMMITTEE.  By Nows' Sj'eoiHl Son. too  By ii.** Associated Pro**  BISMARK. N. LY, Aug. 20. Steps to wa rd providing North Dakota with BITTERLY its first state-owned flour mill under the Non-Partisan League program was taken here recently when the industrial commission, which will direct the operation of all state owned industries under the League plan, authorized J. A. McGovern, manager of the Mill and Elevator Associat-  Government Will Assume Offensive ^OLEMLE [ TEXAS COTTON  Attitude Toward Mexico from Now NOOSE TO OPE! HERE  On, According to Information Received from Washington  w a cm    Ane    1*1    Ursine    ion,    to    make    a    contract    foi    the    put  COMMISSION AFTER  PURSUIT OF BANDITS FIRS" WORKING OUT OF POLICY TO BE PURSUED BY THE LOVIK AMENT.   1  DAYLIGHT SAVING LAW REPEALED OVER VETO  A new produce house will open i for business In Ada the last of the j week. This will be the “Dandridge-Kerr Produce Company,” composed of Ada men and only recently organized. The company has leased  1  the building on West 12th Street for-: I merly occupied by the Ada Star-Democrat and expect to open for j business the last of the week.  I The Dandridge-Kerr company is composed of T. O. Dandridge, Robert  NUKE LISS  LACK OF PRICE GUARANTEE CAUSE OF REDUCTION SAYS F. N. GRAY, COTTON EXPERT.  By the Associated Press  HOUSTON, Tex., Aug. 20.—Cotton acreage under cultivation in Texas is IO per cent less than at the corresponding period last year, according to F. N. Gray, stae cotton crop  Geo re W. man   1  '    *    I'    *    o.i    Onmo- Hy the Associated Press  MARIA.    rex    . Aug.    .    -    WASHINGTON,    Aug.    20.  where in Mexico, opposite Candela-  t j le  daylight saving act was ac  formed connections with some of the largest produce houses of the south- — D  ^    ___  west and will be prepared to han-; specialist in the federal crop nudie produce in any quantities. They I reau at Houston.  ReDeal  wil1 also be in tbe market to buy  The total acreage under cultiva-and sell all kinds of produce and Lon in July was estimated at IO,-  “Sasser”—* ^uL^’Jsrss  d in their pursuit be- fifty-seven to nineteen to sustain the        iLvauinn    of    rn  compared with 11,950,000 year. Based on a  ! S. Kerr and Fred Guinn, all of whom are well know in Ada. They have   m     ■«.    v      i,    _    •    ^    w    a    •    .    ■    rn    m    mm    rn    ■■    ■    rn m « rn    ■    bh    m    mm m BBH H^B    ■    _ ■ ■ m    rn' vt b    rn rn rn'    rn rn    BBH    m    h    b b b    m BB    bb    ^b    b    rn    m    ^m    rn    rn    ■    ■    I  try to private operation as soon as The mill has a Capac > remedy legislation can ^^nacujd.    McGovern    also    was    instructed    |   o7th*UlnUd committee    of    to plan for the«tabU.lmentof the     (     ^  tho    chamber    of commerce of    the    ff'V\!«n"uuctio^ J-' which is ex- OKLAHOMA CITY.    Auk.    20.-  Untted States yesterday presented '‘‘to. . \T' b f <■Irted next spring. Oscar Thraves, of the legal depart the chamber's railroads plan to P     in(iU s,Vial    oemmiss.on    plans    men*    of    the    state    corporation    com-     na  Texas. Am  house interstate commerce commit- •     b     .    mission,    is    at    Lawton    conferring    ,    continued    in    their pursuit be- fifty-seven to nineteen to sustain mo,    —    ierfnd'ition of 65 per cent of normal,  tee. There is manifest throughout    accord-    with    thresher    men    and    grain pro-     bandits     who    cap-    house in pass.ng the repeal measure grnu OF ACTORS WILL ____ tadicates a vieTd of 134 pounds of  FEI'comanche^Junty fured lnd held or ransom Lieuten- »«•«** ^ * he     "H    ««“    per acre.  nance of federal control and off*. l^i n ‘ml“l^"for ^e”^'k.- ”    I«7"h^    minatiou    The    romplain-a    anis IVterson and Davis. Military;_____________   hihBMta  at ion'' said Mr. Dost. "due to the t>,i t. is a* o’ the Drake mi  unfavorable Impression made lo    the    ^  mad( » u hen the industrial com-    will make a    stand    on a    farm    where     mat | 0 „ from    the punitive    expedition. „ , bv     AsMclsted    Press  mission approves Mr. McGovern’s    there is a    large    Vrain crop and    ,    .storms    ii    the    mountains    of    WASHINGTON,    Aug. 20.—Four    house    bt‘chi-1    abandoned acreagewas Mr. Gray s   mOV "  S ' Veral  o? prrnl'ticers OWhn.hu. tote,tup,lug communion- reservations, similar to thosen*eot «    S'tSS^ETcarri^    TTO  WH      who    have smaller acreages to thresh. .ion via army Add    SKT     2 .....*    “    *•*-«"■* ——    - 7 °°'  IXM>I*ERATE WITH AMERICANS Th** state corporation commission aviators ot lh* expedition >  U1   u  drawal from the League of Nations,  „    f or     the state organisation, accord  the coutry. a sarong, ** *     t  Oliver S Morris, secretary of ducers  whelming sentiment against contin- “R*  TO  J ;  the industrial commission.  Mr. Gray de-  and  operation of the* railroads under federal control.”  The program for government ownership advocated by the railroad brotherhoods was attacked by Mr. Post.  "Groups of business men differ in the details of plans for the rial roads,” he said, thev will be found in firm agree  I dared.  I tiiscrunmaiiou. int* vutti^a.u  0  rum      ...... -.......  —    —    —itic*iiFR.VATKINS MADE    *"       •*    «!    “    A    total    crop if 2,985,000 equiva-  Purchase of the Drake mill will Ii a \ ** the usual trend, that threshers quarters her* were without infot-    ‘    ’    *    \f\V    RESOLUTION    CHICAGO,    Aug.    20. A strike of I i en t 500 pound gross weight bales,   _ .... I    „    for,VV VT-Vt .V rn    .      .AuUw    ctficrn hanfEi    an A    mnsif'ians aft an    ^    -    -    —  stage hands and musicians as » n j bowing the usual I per cent for  adjunct to the actors' strike  thr ??‘- abandoned acreage.” was Mr. Gray’s one tA pIacd airorv nlav hniiqp in t!nl-    .    .    t    i    __  lias thr**atened to bring threshers j ast  night with bullet holes iii the ^  att j c j e ten     League    coven-  business men of the country throu  the requeats ...       .      ..    .a    t.,,    „    » = r «“" “ “ CY '“ out only photoplay and vaudeville    ,  houses win be in operation.    I  There wou id have been less re-  ,1 *j> SHIT FODNDEJtS    duetion in acreage,” Mr. Gray de-  *tie a<imk’i» »*• 1    ii fore the commission on such com- pj ant , s 0 f tv ie i r  1 achines. and report-  an j domestic questions and the j    AND MANY    ARE MIST, clares, “but for the limitation 00  •but in one thing MARFA. Tex.. Aug. SO. Mexican plaints but in nearly every instance    attacked    b    ybandit    gang    of    Monroe Doctrine are embodied in    IaBlB.d iy a^t conUnjlous n^  . ftdtral troops are co-operating with th** relief has been secured without    —*h*v a separate resolution prepared today uy th* .\Ms»ci*trd Press  nest from three    ^     h     V    machine    by Senator Pittman of Nevada, Dem-1 LONDON, Aug.    20.—Japan’s  The Comanche beli.\ed    ocratlc member of the foreign rela-1 transport, Shijika Maru, struck a  Clong committee. Pittman said the jrock and  foundered August 15th    _____  20. Anteri- reservations had not been present- soyfh  Q f Sanegashtma, according to Bl LDX K ‘i^rncTnn  mcnt: Government ownership    inuit    American troops in Mexico    accord-    ri.rthcr action than a request    from    three Mea,.ans. one  ©t prevail tl a     received    by    Colonel    th*» commission.   1  Havnt the iadorvmu ut o f     the    Langhorne today from the    Mexican    county situation was  h    consul at Presidio, who    reported    becoming desperate and it    was  said to be gun bullets.  very unusual in June. While various reasons are ascribed for the reduc-(Continued on Page EL,lit.)  a referendum "vote wT^thic chamber's that cavalry troops arc boing sent thought best to have a rePr<**nta-    and    depre-    rd    to    the    president.  plan for the di;p*>siti«)n cf the rail- in the direction of Chihuahua, op- rive upon the ground and see if the    bandit  "oads was presented by Mr. Post as posite Candelaria, Tex., in command producers could not be secured the  directly across  follows:  of General Pruenada  X.—Corporate ownership and operated with comprehensive regulation.  relief for which they had petitioned the commission  the bordar will in the tuture bring a    *    n  the United Stat. armed forces upon AllOttlCr PeWltf  a Nagazaki dispatch received by Lloyds. One hundred and ten on ! board are reported missing.  PRICE COMMITTEE  ing and police powers over the prop-  2.—Return of the railroads to cor- erties. porate operation as soon as reme-    5.—Federal regulation of capital  dial legislation can be enacted.    expenditures and security issues.  3—Consolidation of lines in a    6.—Federal regulation ot of intra-  limited number of strong competing    state rates affecting interstate com-  systeme.    merce.  4.—Railroad companies to become    8.—Creation of a federal transpor-  federaiized, the states to retain tax- tation board.  Two and a Half Tons Opium to Detroit Yearly  Added to K. C. Street Car Fares  HUSBY RESIGNS FROM  AMERICAN WIVES OF ALIEN NOBLEMEN FEEL POVERTY PINCH IN SWITZERLAND  the marauders,    according to evidence  of    the United    States future policy j  from official sources today. The present punitive expedition, led by Major General Joseph T. Dickman, constitutes the first working out of new policy which one official characterized    as "handling the border    nui-    -  saitce without gloves.”     Bv    SpMi .,    service  KANSAS CITY, Mo., Aug. 20.— F AIR*' PR ICE COMMITTEE    •’Another    penny,    please.    The fare  is 7 cents now.”  Bi    th*    A*    xx-ta-tx!    Pre**    ..j  have  ^signed as chairman of This morning Kansas City began  DETROIT.    Mich..    Aug.    20    Two    p air     p r | Cf ? Commitee of    Don-    paying increased    street    car    fares  and one-half tons of opium is earn  fo(oc county tor  th** reason that, as and the request of the conductor for >*>ar brought into the city of Detroit (^ oun ty judge, I have been appointed "another penny” caused many a and most of it is put to illegitimate ^airman of the new county council Kansas Titian to "break” anoth-uses.    according    to    the    federal    au-    defense to b** reorganised at    once,    er 5-cent    piece to meet    the    rising  tliorities.    1 do not feel that I could do justice post of street car transportation.  Detroit lias 40.000 drug addicts,  fo  both positions, as chairman of the Delays were frequent owing to the ■ has been estimated, and city of- y, lir     Committee and as ( hair-  t ; nu . consumed in making change at  Jicials are being urged to establish , nan <>t * th** County Council of De- congested corners. Never before i municipal institution where they *v nse  of this county. may    he    treated    and cured if possible.    ■ • Th** Fail    Pi ic* (’ommittee has  for questioning has brought out th** been well organized and is a compact that a very large proportion of niittee composed ot some of the tli<> victims acquire their drug habit strongest and roost patriotic citi-through association 'with other ad- /.ens of this county. Who are already diets.    at work toward reducing ihe high  Detroit, it is said. is the thil l cost of living. They are sincere in largest opium importing center in their purpose and will accomplish the Unit d States, the major por- results. They should have tin* heartiest co-operation and support or good citiz* i n in Pontotoc council EL BUSBY.*  Arden L. Bullock has been appointed chairman of the Fair Pjice Miss Edna Stokes has' returned Committee of Pontotoc County to  from her summer’s vacation in the -meed Juage B« ^ Ozark mnnntoinc o 1\A UTI Q aj»nm-:  el n ,Iru ’ nanuf,  UCTru  “PP  • A U H     a °M^"    man of the new county council of  panted home by_her    1     dete  .. j,iov Busby found himself  extended v^« h 'to her dnughTe^ Mrs. | unable to act in both cecities and Fifteen‘h S, "‘ P an<1 famil> ''  W *‘ISSTcoJJilttS. 1  “  Let's Be Good to the Old Soldiers  tion of the drug coming in from Canada and Mexico, and the police every g declare the "underground railway ’ ty.” over whish the traffic is handled in the main is operated by a drug smuggling organize ion that is nation-wide.  Not more than IO per cent of th** opium 'brought into this city is used iii prescriptions and patent medicines. it has been stated, OO per cent or more being used for illegal purposes. Medicine manufacturers here, investigation has shown use very lit  CITY IG BEING GAILY DECORATED FOO VETS  w *‘re pennies in such demand, it was said. and the future of the  "penny bank” is declared to he gloomy.  Today increase of I cent in the street car fare is a step to the S-oeiit fare which recently was authorized by the Missouri public service commission. The S-cent charge was to have become effective today by tin* traction company, after se-curing tile sanction of the commission. announced a 7-cent fare until the public had opportunity to purchase the new 8-cent tickets.  Yod P cost more to take the children along, too. Half fare tickets were sold by the conductors at four for 15 cents, or a cash fare of t cents each.  Next Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday Ada will be host to the Confederate Veterans of the whole state. This is probably the last time this city will be honored as the meeting place of the state reunion. \ er\ rapidly now are the ranks of the old heroes of the early sixties thinning, and within a few short years the last surviver of those troublous days will be lowered beneath the sod.  In view of these facts, can we do too much toi them on the occasion of their state reunion?  Can we, in fact, do enough for them on this auspicious  occasion?  We think not, but we can do our best, and we believe Ada will not be content with doing less.  Every business house in the city should be propelly  decorated on this occasion. It is by no means unappro-priate to display the colors of the Confederacy, when  displayed in company with the stars and rdiipes. It is  1    * ___________:a:~~    wa    Tiavp    fur thosi  W. A. Ohs*’ is her* and is *1 roas  ts of th** drug in their prepara- j n g \d a  in arrogant colors for the  0   coming of the I . U. V .’p. American ^  Ti O O OO OOO THE CLEAN-UP.  &  O  o  lions.  nu* mayor of the city has b  Among th** facts brought out by  a n*l Confederate flags and gay col-  n  designated next Friday  as  local Investigations into the use of ored banners are hanging promis-opium is that Americans, native, cuouslx from th* wires over the busi lead all other nationalities in Its! ness part of the city, illegitimate us*  clean-up day. Let us make it I O all that the term implies.  » in Ou* first place the old O veterans will he with us next.  wdconiP to „  wwk an(1 we  should do all in O will ti., lune     |0    haTe     , he    c , ty    0   hailing with joy the event.ul date for the reunion and extending a glad NEWS PRINT INDUSTRY    the old veterans who  TO BE INVESTIGATED from all over the state.  * Mr. W. A. Cease is located in the  IU th.* As^M*iHt***i Pre**.    vacant building just west of the    -    weeds,©  WASHINGTON. Aug. 20. - In vasti j    -    gather    up    the    rubbish    and    get    O  gallon of the news print paper in- parlor. He has an extraordinary ine .    ^  sorts. Noth- O  O our .pow O looking spick and span when © O they come.    O  Duchess of Croy  Recent dispatches from abroad state that many of the  American heireMea who were wed to alien noblemen are fed-‘adopted by the .enate today.    |    ^ei^rieSSid    “nf'tke    next    place    the    busy    o  ing the pinch of poverty in Switzerland. Many OI them are RUMANIAN WAR LEADRRM    man at this trade, he having had O season is soon on which will 2  living in seclusion in tho little republic awaiting help from ‘preparing FOR OFFENSIVE Charge of the greater part of the n carry us into the winter. Weeds O  American relatives. Among those said to be living moderate-    ---- I decoration at Tui*a last yeer at th© o should not he allowed to rot ©  iv in Switzerland is the Ducheaa of Croy, formerly the beau- ImIW *—Bi- ta    National reunion of the V. C. V... |0  OU the premises, as such filth o  tiful Nancy Irishman, of Pitteburgh. Her marriage to the    ' ,A « I «’ A “'[J° a “TeparinV" lr  voting Duke of Croy in October. 1913. near Geneva, created 2„ y  0 f?en«ive e7st of Dnei.ter river finite a sensation. The marriage was opposed by the family I  for the purpoB e of joining General  of the Duke, who risked social ostracism for himself and his J Denekines. Anti-bolshevik forces are wife bv marrying the American girl. The family later with- now in southern Russia according  drew tha opposition to the marriage.     to the Echo de Paris *  I    ©    breeds disease.    O  turn    ©    .Spendtng a little    time now    ©  WE ATH KR FORE! ASI    ©    cleaning UP your place and you    ©J  - '    d    will    not    have    to    spend    so    much    O  to-    O    for doctor bills this    winter.    O  Partly cloudy tonight and arrow. Showei west portion of state  ©  morrow. Shovers lo the extreme ^ ^    OO    000000©  only a recognition of the respect we have for those who fought in a cause they believed to be just.  It is also the duty of every citizen to get his business and his work in such shape as to give the old veteran* a part of their time. All persons who own cars should place them and a driver at the disposal ot the \isito_s at certain hours during each day.  Proper arrangements should, and we are sure will, be made for the accommodation of all guests in the matter of eating and sleeping quarters.  Every person should wear their best smile and go oui of their way, if need be, to make the old veterans feel at home, in fact we want them to feel that Ada is the most hospitable city in which they have ever assembled, and we want them to feel it so effectively that they will tell others about it wherever they go.  Every small boy and girl should make it a point to be quiet and courteous when in the presence of our guests, the old veterans, and they should do all in their power to make their visit here a comfortable and enjoyable one.  Ada has never done things by halves in the past. v\ e cannot afford to do so now. But let us outdo ourselves when the veterans come to town. As they depart from here next week, many of them never to return, let us acquit ourselves so they may have notmng but worts praise for Ada and her people.  it will be a'small matter for our people to do thesu things, but in doing them we will do much tor Ada, and that is, or should be, the desire of every loyal citizen >t  the city.   

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