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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: August 7, 1919 - Page 1

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Publication: Ada Evening News

Location: Ada, Oklahoma

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - August 7, 1919, Ada, Oklahoma                             BIG RETURNS firms DISTRICT THREE CENTS THE COPY ADA, OKLAHOMA, THURSDAY, AUGUST 7, 1919 VOLUME XVI. NUMBER 126 Cong. SECRETARY OF WAR BAKER RELAXES FROM THE STRAIN OF WAR DUTIES by Threat THI-; I'liOPUS ARK NOT GOING TO KOLD THBTO HANDS, SAYS ORGAN D5ED LKADKR. i lly News' Siweinl WASHINGTON, Aug. 7.- Imme- diate relief from the high cost ol living or social revolution. This was the ultimatum that or- ganized labor delivered directly to congress yesierday. The workers' attitude was pre- sented by Wan-fin S. Stone, grand >hief of the Brotherhood ot Loco- motive Engineers, and Frank Mor- rson, secretary of the American Federation ol' Labor, appearing be-, fore the house committee on inter-] suite and foreign commerce in sup- in Ann wuit.- uuii.-iv" pui't ot 'the plumb plan for gov- Tuesdny that an embargo had been I (.niment ownership of railroads. Mr. placed on freight shipments all points in this division, due to; the labor trouble In the railway, "BRINGING HOME THE BACON" SOLD AT COST BY NEWARK'S POPULAR MAYOR COMKS AH RESULT OF THROUGH- OUT COUNTRY AND 1M KS TRAFFIC. llv Railroad administration officials Ada were advised from Sapulpa unions. 1 The order advised that the rail- freight, lUillef Come Now. '1 want to say one thing --and I no spirit of threat, I suv it in simply want to state it as a K, accept Jlthln months amounts. These two commodities, Piooipm wit" will i ihe order said, i "subject to delay in ou transportation vou vou' have ever s trouble. order has been issued I by J superintendent, lor the Frisco lines at Springfield., Mo stating that no freight would i be 'accepted for shipment except; I perishable goods, livestock and mer-, chantilse from connecting, until, further notice. large number of trainmen have been thrown out of work, because more than half of the switch en- gines operating at the Tulsa termin- al are tied up for repairs. With one to keep them running order it is only a question or hours, of- ficials say, until the remaining en- i gines will be tied up also. At Sapulpa 350 shopmen and unless mo are not going lo fold r hands while they starve. They j die fighting." ItnckmJ by Morrison. This declr was backed up by Mr. Morrison just before the adjournment of the afternoon ses- sion The federation official was great lv excited. Looking defiance at the monitors' of. ihe committee. ;fij2S.v oHl'UllUL r Biker orilo recreation. When ever pos- helpers walked out Tuesday and Secretary of ar Newton Baker oiuo awjlv ,he plraln Joined the nation-wide strike for the lOtographed on the public courts for an hour or two i national agreement submitted to all photographed on the public courts in Potomac Park, Washington. D. C. "There is great unrest in the country. Great bodies oi' men who lire not receiving the wages to A-hlch they are entitled, are strik- ing in spite of their officials. "There comes a time when the burden is too heavy and when that time arrives, you may expect a rev- olution to the extent of striking for better conditions affecting the wel- is mm HB YKT I'lUOKS SOAH AVHJJ.T! 1'BO- IM.E STRIKE ON ACCOUNT OF THE HIGH COST OF IAVING. WASHINGTON, Aug. though prices of practically all im- portant foods have shown a sub- stantial increase during the last ye-ir slacks of foods held in stor- age June 1st of this year were ap- proximately 20 greater than those held on the same date in 1918, ac- cording to a memorandum showing the relation between storage figures and prices issued by the federal trade commission today. To show that the law of supply not working, the many staple foods which, June 1st, showed an increase of stocks withheld from market ranging from three to two hundred iuid ninety-eight per cent over stocks held June 1st. 1018. Stocks of iroz- en fowls showed a maximum in- crease of two hundred and ninety- eight per cent, anr" despite this fact the price increased three cents per as did other foodu. HUss CovtiiKton's Father Dies. U1II U U 11 111 r iiii 11 w i v t Mil it- r in of tennis This photograph is one I railroads, demanding 85 cents an rarp of workers." whilP olavin- a spirited set of ten- 01- lhl. verv few taken of tho Sec-1 hour and double time for overtime, Ml, Morrison was moved to give nis. Teinis is the Secretary's far- rotary In sporting pose. _ j together with back pay from Jan- this warnlng_by the -Vda friends of Miss Mildred Cov-j former secretary at East] Central, have received word that: ust 6tV at their Njme in ditional few cents to cover handling, "Glad to Preach In a Mule Shed" and sQUeeze hand as if were soul and body with me, they imi then ,11111 linn U a l i I The action taken by the hapul- pa union men came after an all morning session held Tuesday, at go out and give me a which they reversed the decision ar- Wcbst.-r, repubhc.au, of Washington, organized us! arbitration. The action of the mo- This movnins be-fore a large au- dience :it ihe tabernacle Ham, the evangelist, expressed the joy tonight. Some of you say you have been forced to say that you are in accord with what we have said and virtufilly forced to make a sort of half way confession of your pollut- ed, hell inspired behavior. We want chanical workers all over the coun- try altered the decision ot the Sa- pulpa men and the vote to strike was reported as almost unanimous. Is e. Thank God r______ to preach "li Chrisi in a mule shed. He was born that in a stable and c IN PRAYER At the tabevnacle Wednesday evening the audience was very much but not enough concern- was attempting to coerce congress. COUXTIIV SCHOOLS IX GOOD CONDITION. SAYS SUIT. FLOYD County Superintendent of Schools A Floyd visited the schools at Maxwell, Summers Chapel, Tuns' Chapel and Laiiham yester- day and reports them in good con- dii'ion. He states that the attend- ance is much larger than usual and Hint the children are taking active intiTi-st in their work. Most of Ihe country schools run iwo months in the summer and six months in the fall and wimcr. in order that Ihe young people mny have ihe opportunity 10 help nut Ihe colton harvest. WEATHER FORECAST she "was associated during her stay at East Central, who will regret very much to learn of her father's death. Mr. Coviugton has been ill for some time and i was on the account of his Illness that Miss Cov- ington resigned her position at the Normal several weeks In order to be with him. Mr. Covlngton lived at Coving- ton, Okla., for a number of yearrt prior to their removal to Vinita, aud it was for him that the town of Covington was so named. His remains will be shipped to tomorrow for interment. and had it distributed to the public through the city-departments. Thou- tions and public mniaings. i ma -o Mayor Charles 1'. Gillen's first move sauds took advantage of the oi er. VRSSELS COIAIOE AND ONE BELIEVED SUNK Hy the Associated Press HALIFAX, Aug. W. B. Bennett, of the British steamer, Warwick, reported by wireless to day that Ms vessel collided with the masted schooner, Gallia, and gave of :lw names of seven persons saved, pre-i sumably from the schooner. The lat- Wilson May Seek To Succesd Ferris For Congress FOR! Sill ter i.- believed to be sunk. UKOOKLYN ST1U5BT LT BY STRIKK of vour cfturcn memuers is ey a--e vellow and ought to. the lest -of his He left us be" kicked out'of the churches. I, an example that we should rono have them flatter me and pat me needs. K. respect his mess ahship on the back. Some of them come (Continued on Page iMglit.) "The Man Who Turned Sf. This will be the subject of Rev. Hani, the evangelist, at the Tabernacle this evening. Better not miss this sermon. The Service Starts at Be On Time j of ihe evangelists, Ham and Ram-! say At. the close of the meeting Reverend Ham announced that he; would expect the people of God to come tonight ready to spend the entire night in prayer, if such be- came needful to bring the convic- t'ion now required to break into the lives of wicked men in women in j Ada. i The sermon dealt with the prob-, 1cm- "Why men deliberately go to hell." His text was "Ye will not! come to mo that ye might have life." His sermon followed the following line of suggestion. "Why will men deliberately go to hell? All who go, do so of their own choice. It is not the will of God that any perish. Nobody will go to hell because salvation has not been provided. "God so loved the world j that whosoever bellevelh in him should not perish, but have ever- lasting life." N'o man would con- tinue iu sin but for the fact that the de'vil ban men blinded. You are just as near hell as-you are death and Ihe grave, and yet you are -not disturbed. The unbelief of this age lias been surpassed In no other age save that of Noah. Yet, no people seem to think seriously of I the danger ot hell. God called ev- ery .Christian man here to lead men to the Lord, but you will not even try to bring thorn here to these meetings. If you have a light, it; must be mighty dim, I "No man will ever go to hell on account of tho aln of Adam, and i none for the sin of their parents: 1 any more than you are to blame for the color of jfour hair or eyes.' No man will -go to hell because there are hypocrltg in the churches, j (Continued on Page Eight.) Mfttcincill Government officials, stirred by the country-wide appeals tor a re- duction in tho cost of living, are considering, according ,to a report from Washington, the possibility of bringing Herbert Hoover back from Europe find placing1 the nation on rations under, him as a means of combating the soaring prices ot foodstuff. would match the Ada (earn for a game of ball next Sunday, word was received this morning, through Simmers Jones, to the ef- fect ''hat Fort Sill would not put in their'appearance here Sunday, their reason being the unsettled condition of transportation, made so by the railroad strikes'. have beeu made with the Coalgale ball team for a game, on the local field Sunday aft- ernoon. Reports are to the effect! that the Coalgate team has not lost) a game this season, which tion inspires the Ada boys to do their best. CABINET IS OVKRTH110WX REPORT SA1S. I i lly i he I'rcai I PARIS. Aug. peace con- j ference was advised today that, the; Hungarian cabinet, headed by Jules Peidll, had been overthrown and that Archduke Joseph had estab- lished a ministry in Budapest. The coup was carried out without dlr- order according to advices. The entente mission In this city delegated authority tonight to Arcb- duke Joseph, when the Peidll gov- ernment resigned. Advices to the peace conference also stated that Rumanian forces had crossed the river Danube into Budapest business, section and were seining supplies preparatory to send- ing them to Rumania. Rumanians are charged with having made as- saults against many inoffensive per- sons and having forced entrance into private Portions ot the railway between Budapest and Vien- na have been destroyed. By NEW YORK, .IVUK. com-1 plete tieup of the "Brooklyn rapid; Transit Co.'s subway, elevated and surface lines continued today. Trains' and cars discontinued service last I night at 11 p. m. IKlTM'RST FOOD SITUATION i HAS I1FCOMK ORITICAIj By Ajsociawd Preas I KERLIN, Aug. sit-, nation in Budapest has become criti- cal because most'of the productive food territories have been cut off from the' capital by the Rumanian advance, according to advices here. It will pay you to watch the: OKLAHOMA CITY, Aug. 7 When Representative Scott Ferns of Lawton makes his formal an- nouncement for the democratic nom- ination for United. States senator in opposition to Senator Gore, R. H. WU" in. state superintendent, will enter the race for the democratic nomination to succeed Ferris as the sixth district congressman, (-it was said at the capitol yesterday by close friends of Wilaon. Superintendent Wilson admitted that he was and had for some time been giving the matter "serious con- but declared he would make no announcement of his fu- ture political ambitions until. Fer- ris definitely enters the senatorial race. Ferris' announcement is ex- pected within a few days. Wilson has been superintendent of schools in Oklahoma for eight years and in each of his statewide campaigns he has carried each of the counties embraced in the sixth district. Leather Price Forces Farmers to Use Chain Harness; State to Act Oklahoma farmers are using chain and rope for harness because they can't stand the price of leather. That was the statement of J. A. Whitenurst, president of the board of agriculture, Wednesday. Because of this situation Whitehurst conferred with Governor Robertson and a. plan for establish- ment of tanneries at state institutions was launched. Under this plan raw hides will be made into har- ness at manual training departments of the.state in- stitutions and the sale will be direct to the. farmer. "This will have both an economic and education- al said Whitehurst. The plan, he said, would be rushed. The harness situation is- regarded as signiticanc in light of the-federal trade commission report to- day on the leather and shoe situation, alleging ex- cessive profits all along the line.   

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