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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: August 1, 1919 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - August 1, 1919, Ada, Oklahoma                             There Is Nothing More Appropriate Than That J. a Time Should Be Set Aside in the Month of August to Do Honor to Confederate Brao, VOLUME XVI, NUMBER 121 "ADA. OKLAHOMA. FRIDAY, AUGUST i, 1919. THREE CENTS THE COPY Oklahoma City ooe Thu Asked t From Pol 's Army Wasln Poor Condition to Attempt Conquest of North Mexico ASSAULT ON OK- NEWSPAPER KE- I ivRTBRS STARTS MOVK nx> ri.BAX UP FORCE. TCRTOSE is i AXIKS OKLAHOMA'S KX10R SENATOR YESTERDAY. By SpocUl "WASHINGTON, J nly ,hc J I'ASO. Texas. August ls i Franscisco Villa's iirmy which ad- Ivancod on Juarez with the intention ]01- conquering northern -Mexico and Liablishinx a government in American troop. the North, retired before butted 0 troops badly demoralised and recognize SliUvS IIAK'1'5' Uttuv was urged today by Senator disorsiulizodi snys deserters. Owen, democrat, Oklahoma, to ae-, pressed soldiers who escaped inl- and cept the league of nations covenant. civilians who in order to Establish a new world Ahun.ada. order, and not to delay its action by "captious and -partisan dispute" saw them at over the wording of is various pro- visions. "I shall uot criticise the rhetoric or the verbiage of the covenant." said Senator Owen. "This covenant and nights ol in- men south that or bick .0 ,ho in ,hc muniiion supply staff who came to the the retirement said many oi e border alter (ls UU' 1 flu i men had no aimuiiUon. OnlyA I lias bodyguard had more than 100 its substance it is splendid, purpose it is glorious. "A perfect contract between scoundrels is worthless. An imper- fect contract between trustworthy friends, who have fought and blea together in a common love of jus- tice and liberty, is of very- great value. Let us be devoutly thankful for the opportunity to b'nd the world together in bonds of peace. "On the battlefields a league of victorious nations was estab- lished. The nations composing It discovered that while they were] bound together by the exigencies of, war in framing the future rela-; tions oi the nations of Europe with Germany. It was essential to es-. tablish 'a league that should em-1 brace all the nations of the world., "The political enemies of Presl-j dent Wilson should throw them-; selves in blind fury against the covenant on the theory that It is a' child. The principles of the lea- gue are those of ihe conventions drought down to date. It represents the best opinions of the whole civ- ilized world. Do not slay the cove- nant as President Wilson's child. HP is not the real father, but only an honest physician who presided over the accouchment." rounds, its rifles aw; sort with mil-suit. Villa's at Uy Spoclnl OKLAHOMA CITY, Aug. l--The immediate removal of J. Garrrison Kitchens f''om the police force will ibe iisked by Mike Donnelly, com- who led .the fighting in missioner of finance, at a meeting sid to havo denounced lot tho city commissioners this ,rrWd the bandit leader i noon, as a result of the unwarranted HI his men into believing j attack wade by Kitchens on A. I States government would j Findley, an OklaDomwi reporter, at the Villa revolution and the police station Wednesday night would not molest at o'clock. inn res i- a city commissioner I do not beaching Bonder wish to be responsible for retaining 200 picked on .he police force a man who has his forces and started conducted himself as Kitchens lias, 'toward' I'arral. public records he could not -light the Am-1 headquarters and that the public or newspapers cannot legally be barred from ihern. Walton Mayor Walton was quoted England Wants Government Ownership of Railroads Regardless Our Failure ericans" and saying going s. Villa activ- vicinity of Parral. re- 'pf "hislcently would tend to confirm this report. General Angeles was repor- ted to have separated from to border. ave son hiding m the hills near an say one nif.il tie was "investigat- Jie was not consider- removnl. He was nad then man fhen wLn e them vilien e :a u, officials in Juarez the rebels de organrzed the trouble. Kitchen "soldiers' sailors, and lnR wal- were without food and that their morale was very low. Dissensions took place Villa's men after Juarez near HIP Ponchos river ton's campaign for mayor. P Wu by Villa's dm- week ago today the mayor ,o b" "he HP a bulletin in the police sta- Villa's forces and all of his! lion e for Villa's force, an., au and Oklahoma City bat.l Mar- 1 bands are drifting in that U.rccMQi polico T railways and coal mines are at pres- ent financial invalids. Both of these industries still are controlled by the government, under war legisla- tion. Proposals that both should nationalized are among the most important reconstruction plans now j being agitated here. by .the neV Ministry of Transport with a guarantee of pre-war profits to the shareholders. The coal mines are operated by a controller who fixes the conpensation of the mine owners. "The system of the country are financially in a semi- paralyzed the Minister of Transport, Sir Eric Geddes, recent- ly told the House of Commons. The balance sheet of the railroads f or the coming year, as he forecast it, will show a loss of troin 000 to against an nual profH of about for the five last years before the war.) and Sir Eric estimates the increased war wages and other con- cessions at the eight hour day and other new concessions to 'cost from to 000 000 and the extra cost of ma- terials and coal mak- ing the increased cost of running the railroads to without taking into account of HE SAYS EVERY ONE NEEDS REFUGE, BUT MANY DO XOT RECOGNIZE THE FACT. Officers and Bandits Exchange Fifty Shots Near Tulsa Yesterday i exact wording -of the bulletin was to the effect that tn% representatives 'of the two papers were not to be financiers contest these fig- ures strongly and assert that the deficit is merely a paper one due to failure in bookkeeping to charge the immense government traffic at rates which private traffic would cost, and that the financial outlook is nowise as bad as Sir Eric's view of it. The deficits of the railways and mines are defrayed under present arrangements, the former directly from the treasury out of the pock- ets of the tax payers, the latter by the whole community' through official- advances in the coal. under arrest." I Itoporter Tried Today. i simultaneously with the introduc- of the resolution In the com- missioners1 meeting asking Kitchens i removal, the reporter will be tried in municipal court on charges of I with an officer while in (Continued from page 5) Pioneer Phone Service To Improve With Private Control; No Excuses Go CO.HMJTTEK AI'POIXTKD TO IXVKSTIOATK THK H. lly UH> WASHINGTON. Aim. 1. A com- mittee to conduct an investigation of tho high cost of living, and report its findings to president Wilson, was appointed at a conference yes-: terday of cabinet officers at the, office of Attorney General I'almer. This was announced today at the White House. The committee names: wore not given out. The committee will compile sug-i gfstlons already made and report to AIIU-. 3.- Street car service, resumed July 17. follow- ing a seven weeks' strike by carmen Was discontinued today when car men uecUwed a new strike, as- sorting that the company failed to keep tho terms of the recent com- promise and ol serve seniority POLISH I'AHTV RATU-'IKD (JKK.MAX TltKA TY yKSTKKDAV i'i.. PAIilS, Aug. Tho Polish par- liament yesterday laiifitd the- Ger- man peace treaty and also ihe treaty for the protection minorities, ac- Sliwinl Service TULSA, Okla.. July than fifty shots were fired during a runnim: gun battle near Alsuma 'on the Hroken Arrow-Tiilsa high- way at 3 o'clock between posse- Mien and the four bandits who at o'clock Thursday afternoon held up and robbed the Bank ol Jenlis. at twelve miles south i of this city, escaping with all of bank's available funds. This report was brought to Tul- .mi by Sheriff James Wooley who was 'compelled to withdraw from 'ihe chnso when his automobile be- 'cani" disabled and he returned to [lie city for another car. With the sighting of the bandits near Alsuma ;it is apparent, the robbers circled STRIKK CALLED PROTEST J J I V'J AGAINST CERTAIN ORDERS YKKKTTING THE DE- PARTMENT. AnbOcIfcUx] LONDON, Aug. through Ropers county moving back tow cause of this fact officers are in- clined to believe the four men make here. story told by circieu. uw.ij.rwn, ixuo- and are i mike _ and prov nc.al suggested, Palmer said, to sell year's wheat crop at ie niiirkt-t ai.d 'make up tho guarantee 10 the farmers out of a billion dollar ap- propriation. I.MPOKTANT TIIKATV WAS SICNKO ,11'NE SAVS rums went into effect today with la- uory toiu Oi- circles calling some slxty-nvc the automo-; thousand police and prison front 'of the The home _secretary admitted hs seat, three hundred policemen ou MISS JOSEPHINE DUNN _ __ _ _ _ _ ,._., o o oe o o o o o A I'.AHH B> the Asaocintc.il I'rru WASHINGTON, Aug. 1. A ,of the treaty between the. Big Kive powers and Poland, said to havo j been signed at Versailles June 25.. i was put in-to rthe senate records to-1 dav by Lodge of the ror-j eijin relattewffcommittee. who said, that it ha.dvbeen submit led to tin British parliament weeks ago. V o'i O 0 HKllH'S o u There's a drugKisi in Ada t? O who alleges that he is too busy O O to do any advertising .becae.se 'j O he doesn''t liavt time to write his copy. HAwanis to, but he's 0 O overworked to sttcji a degree O O he just can't find time, to tell O Oprospectlve buyers of Hie alleged C O advantages his store offers; ol O 0 i ho allngftd BOiwlci- he and his 0 O salespeople reiulei-; of the C O cordiality with which O O they the public; of tho O O many pleasant ihings they O claim to maXe your drug store O O shopping pleasant. Yes, and O O he's too busy, he says, to in- O O vile you through the public O O press to visit his Ktore. There O O are think enough O business lo ask for It. O O Otto 'erod hlmsolf and B. E. Johnson. I bookkeeper, to hold up their hands j while one of the handlts kept them 'covered the other two deliberately ransacked the vault taking between 1 and With the fall- Ing of darkness it Is believed any I hope that the officers may have ,ol' capturing the bandits will be dispelled. It is likely the men will '.continue on into the Osage hills where they will find it a compara- tlvelv easv matter to avoid detec- no figures for other cities. Chicago Race War Declared to Be End Today tion. The robbery of the bank was not featured by any shooting. The band- its were well outside of Jenks be- Tore the cashier had time to spread an alarm. Rev. Harold G. Cooke known as Tnlsa's Jazz parson bo- H.v iho AKHociatod PI-CBS CHICAGO, Aug. With state troops' in fnD -control of the black heli, race rioting that terrorized the city lor four clays was pronounced at an end today by the city and stale officials. 'The deaths result- and I lly News' SJXMMH! Scrvico OKLAHOMA CITY. Aug. 1 The iday of excuses and apologies from the Southwestern Bell Telephone (Company for poor service in Okla- homa ended last night with the res- toration of private ownership and state control of the transmission lines, it was declared yesterday by Art L. Walker, chairman of the cor- poration commission. From now on the state, through the corporation commission, will as- sert its rights, and hold the com- pany to "strict accountability" for j t-he'class of service it renders to Us patrons in Oklahoma, Walker said. Telephone officials were in con- ference yesterday with Chairman Walker, aud promised Improvement, 1'but declared the change for the bet- tor must necessarily come slowly, due to the training of new opera- tors. The end of government control of the lines, Jt was stated, removes every barrier which company offi- cials in the past have declared stood lii the way of better service and ne- cessary improvements. inefficient help, due to low wages made neces- sary by government control, which precluded, lo a certain extent, in- creases in operation expenses, has been the reason assigned in most instances by telephone officials for the poor service. Rale-Making Up Suito. i But now it is declared there is 1 nothing to keep the company from paying wages' sufficiently attractive to'get the right class of help to ren- der service commensurate with the rates the company demands for ser- vice. The company can get the class of help which it has said it has been unable to get in the past be- cause of low wages and get credit for the increase as a part of the op- erating expenses when the rate ad- justment is taken up before the com- mossion, Chairman Walker said. The question of rate making is I now up to the state, but improve- STOCKHOLM, Ang. Is informed by persons' closely connected with the Russian' soviet government that Nikolai Len-; ine. the premier, intends to begin' a drastic change of policy and then j resign. One condition of retire-j men't will be that Leo Trotsky, the bolshevik war minister, be left in command of red army. I AXTMIOLSHFA'IK ARMY I CAPTURES IMPORTANT CITY LONDON, Aug. was re- ceived here today that the volun- teer army of General Denekene, one j of'the most important of Hie Rus-' sian anti-brtlshevik forces, has scor- t ed another important success in cap- turing th-3 city of Poltava. I ihe leaders in the bandit hunt. He was a the county court house when first report of the robbery was land fourteen .white. The Injured Miss Joiephinc Dunn, sixteen years of age, who hails from Yazoo, graduated from aviation and hae been flying a plane over Atlantic City, doing noes dives, tall spins, etc. She been called the most remarkable It Is by the Aero Club of America, and has few equals In Glenn CurtlBi been building a ipoclal plane for her, it It finished Ann will carry Hie received and volunteered his tomobile. It was quickly filled deputies, Hev.' Cooke acting chauffeur. au- exceed five hundred. O O O O OO 0 O O 0 O ADIOS TO SHIMMY: j. (iore Coming., to Ada. M. Parker of this city has f. LOS ANGELES, Gal., Aug. 1. O -The "shimmy" and "cheek- O dances henceforth O will not be tolerated in Select O received a letter'from U. Senator jo LOR Angeles clubs. Tomas P. Gore, bearing date oriO These dances are unrefined, w July 24th, In part as follows: "I o according to an edict Issued by o JUIJ Uip v expect to be in the State August 19th and expect to Visit Ada while there. Win -seek 'the pleasure of f w With best believe me, V.erjy rtruly T. P. V-V1-----" i 0 the LOB' Aiigeles athletic cluD O and must not be attempted at w 5> the, organization's social rune- O tlons -Other clubs are follow- O ing suit. condition precedent to any Increases or adjustments, Chairman said. "The time has arrived when the people of Oklahoma can.no longer be expected to tolerate the -miserable telephone service that has been giv- en by the Southwestern Bell Tele- phone company during the past few said Mr. Walker. Complaint Men Required. Late yesterday afternoon Walker i served notice on the company offl- 'clala that from now on all tele- phone complaints will be handled in a formal way, tnd unless promptly the commission will pro- ceed against them. Walker yesterday' asked telephone company officials to designate one man in their office Jo recede com- (Contlnued on Evangelist Ham's sermon Thurs- day night was based on Isaiah "And a man shall be as an hiding place from the wind, and a covert from the tempest; as rivers of water in a dry place, aa a shadow of great rock in a weary land." Twice in my life I have had brought home to me very vivid realization of the aptness and force of Isaiah's figurative laguage in the text. One of the most striking pictures I saw in the British Art gallery was that of a raging tempest sweeping trees, houses and barns before it. In one corner was a party of frightened people observing the approaching storm, and in another a group awe-struck horses, with heads erect and distended nostrils, bodies ap1 parently all aquiver as they intently watched the coming storm and heard its roar. In my tour of Egypt I sood on. tne great pyramid of Cheops and looked across a desert as far as the eye could see, and that is a long way in that clear, dry atmosphere. In the opposite direction I could see across the valley of the Nile, which stream courses its way along the center of the strip of valley ren- :dered fertile and fruitful by its wa- ters, and beyond this I could see the desert on the other side. On camel's hack I rode through that desert as far as the Tombs of the Kings, a parching hot, windy journey, over a desolate and weary land, 'just before we reached the Tombs, scorching hot and thirsty, we rounded a sand-hill and came suddenly into the shadow of a huge rock lowering up out of the sands many hundreds of feet above us. lit was like entering a cave. The lair was delightfully cool and re- freshing making us feel like new creatures. i Instantly the words of this text came into my mind, and I said that the old prophet certainly knew what he was talking about when he spoke of the shadow of a great rock in a weary land as a grateful refuge for the way-worn traveler. And what that great rock was to me on that day Jesus Christ has been to me every day since. Refuge a Universal Need. Every man needs a refuge, though many do not recognize it till the on- coming storm is hard upon them. Because they do not feel the need provide fuel unt-il the winter blasts begin lo howl. They are not so wise as the bee and the ant. The" devil makes it his chief business to see that men do not feel alarm un- til destruction is so near alarm wilt do no good. All men need refuge; for .any man's inner life) is-liable to be swept by storms of more or less violence. Storms of sorrow drive some to de- spair and even to self-destruction, because they have noc availed them- selves of the refuge God has' pro- vided for all. Storms of misfortune are ever rendering them helpless unless they have .refuge in this "covert from the tempest." Dry and fruitless are the lives of those who have never drunk of the "rivers of living water, sup- plied by Jesus Christ, the Savior. The journey of life lies through a weary desert to those who have (Continued on Page Eight.) A SUGGESTION. O Repreientative Franklin F. Worth, now serving third member of the houia, announced hl< candidacy for governor of Minne- sota. Is mwnbsr of commit. on Interstate and foreign com- The miserable hole that has O O worn almost through the pav- O ;O ing ut the intersection of O JO Twelfth and Townsend, at ;O south side of the traffic post, O is becoming dangerous. O ;w We s-uggest that somebody O JO pass the hat tht a-.iio- O JO mobile Owners- pf Mie cKy, b.iy o O a of and a few S O gallons of branch water and O O repair it before somebody gets O O killed. The work could be done O at small expense Md with O very little time. This is only O a, suggestion and we offer it in'O the spirit In which it is most O O likely to be taken. O O O O O O O OO Q O O' O'-O O O   

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