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Ada Evening News: Tuesday, June 24, 1919 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News (Newspaper) - June 24, 1919, Ada, Oklahoma                                 Ach Hemmel! The Germans Have Decided to Sign Without Accepting the Good Licking Promised Them bg Foch a Few Days Ago  Wht evening joteta#  VOLUME XVI. NUMBER 88  ADA, OKLAHOMA, TUESDAY, JUNE 24, 1919,  TWO CENTS THE COPY  Mystery in Death of Unknown Woman at Frisco Depot Today  Uncle Sam Asks Everybody to Drink Buttermilk On July First and Get Habit  THAI SIGN TREATY  DR. H AMEL VOX HAIMHAUSEN WILL NOT ASSUME RESPON-SIUILITY OF SIGNING FOK GERMANY.  By the Associated Presa  WEIMAR, June 24.—Dr. Haniel von Haimhausen who was, on last Sunday, designated as German representative to sign the treaty of peace for the Germans, has telegraphed his resignation rather than sign the treaty.  The German leaders seem to fear the consequences of being parties to the peace agreement, w'hicb is an indication that internal troubles in Germany are on the increase. Afraid to sign and afraid not to sizes up the situation in the unfortunate empire which percipitated the world war.  WASHINGTON. D. C., June 23. —July I is National Buttermilk Day. Buttermilk, the United States Department of Agriculture thinks, is one of the best drinks in the world —nutritious, palatable and full of zest and vim. The man who drinks buttermilk regularly and copiously is doing a good turn for himself. That Is one of the purposes of proclaiming National Buttermilk Day. The other is that the dairy indus-  It is pointed out that, while straight buttermilk is an excellent drink, there are a number of delicious combinations. Buttermilk lemonade is obtained by adding the juice of two or three lemons to a quart of buttermilk, with sugar to taste. Buttermilk may be combined with lemon juice, orange juice or eggs and sugar Cor making frozen dainties.  Aside fpom its food and bever-  FKEIjS THAT AT GOWING OF PEAC E HK WILL HAVE FULFILLED HIS MISSION.  WAS SHE POISONED? VO MARKS OF IDENTIFICATION; DIED WHILE GOING FROM OOAL-GATE TO SULPHUR.  Gov. Robertson Approves ‘For France Week Issues  Mystery surrounds the death of 1/vvM/y^Y/Iif r/1 p    an unknown woman which occurred  VrOClQIuCLllOTl TOK support  at the  Frisco passenger depot this  __ morning at 8 o’clock.  Was she poisoned or did che die The following proclamation in slavery. They paid to the utmost from heart failure?  support of the campaign for funds  with  < he * r live8 >  their 8on8 >  Their There was no mark on or about   daughters and their homes.  for the American Committee for  “We cannot restore to them their  Dj til** Associated Ureas  PARIS. June 24.— Premier Clem-enceau, of France, has expressed his intention of resigning from office as soon as the peace treaty is signed.  The premier feels that when the  the woman by which she could be identified, and a careful search through a worn suitcase which she carried failed to give any clue as  Devastated France was issued under  sons or  their daughters who died the date of June 20th by the Hon-1 for us, but we can help them in orable J B A Robertson gover- another vital way. The American to her name or place of residence.  . rtM k '    I Committee for Devastated France  A     minutes    before    8    o’clock  not of Oklahoma:     hag found |hat u wi „  bf maQy  the porter at the depot called John  "To the People of Oklahoma:    • years before France can collect its | V ^ V ^!! d  _  “At this time, w’hen we of this war debt. In the meantime hun-State of Oklahoma and these dreds  of  thousands will be literally  almost homeless lf America does  try in the United States will be. age qualities, buttermilk is said to a .    *    ai    trued    he    win    have    ac-    United States are about to celebrate, , ,  encouraged.    , possess medical qualities Many    Se    task    C    which    he    our Independence, our freedom j "Vh^fore I, is with sincere  Buttermilk Pay. it is hoped, will physicians present* It in the treat-    premiership,    says    Mar-    Therefore,    it    is    with    sincere  mem of ceria,n intestinal dlsor- ;     , h( .     Koh    de     ,. aris .     it   dors. The bacteria that brings  exnected that the  narliament will ! about the chemical change in which  remind many people of this drink, introduce it to others, and be the beginning of a greater consumption  oeginnmg ox a greater rousuiiipuuu , awm mc tucuut.. *     rat jf v  .»> , trpatv    late in July The     our  oounaiess crops    ana me miner-  of buttermilk that will contribute j buttermilk is produced    announcement of    the premier.'it is    als and oils of the    earth, it Is pe-  ^ ’srs.-oE rs sssrzx: sets    ^    «* « —  i i ..  a A  .   v . the common people of France.  help dairy farmers to develop pro-; ganisms that, in che human body,      -  duotion.    tend to hasten senility. Many prom-  To insure an ample supply of but- inent men drink buttermilk regu- lr    HwJ  termilk, both for. homes and for larlv as a tonic. One of the most i Vli-itf    UU    VI/.  hot3ls and restaurants on July I, the Department of Agriculture re-  widely known lecturers and writers in the United States drinks butter-  world.  “Highest, perhaps, in our affec  PARIS, June 23.—No word has been received from Weimar relate to the actions of the German plenipotentiaries at Versailles. The date of the ceremony of signing the peace treaty has not yet been fixed, but belief has gained ground that it will be Thursday or possibly Friday.  More Names Added.  Dear Mr. Brown;  Three names are omitted from your list of “immortals,” viz:  Percy O. Barton,  Norman V. Howard,  Harry W. Jones.  Howard enlisted in the 90th division. formerly lived in Pontotoc county and in the county his relatives still live. I am under the impression that he enlisted from Ada.  Jones was still in the service after the war was declared, but at the time of his death had been discharged. E. A. MACMILLAN.  quests creameries, milk plants, and milk as regularly as he brushes his other dairy establishments to co- teeth—and declares that he feels operate in Ute plan to popularize the j himself getting younger with every drink.    ‘ glassful.__  Big Tabernacle Almost Ready for Ham-Ramsey Company, Coming July I  Sees Big Things In New Mexico  NOTE—It has also been called to our attention that the names of Sam Jobe. Hub Trimm, and Geo. W. Cooper were left out of the list* We will appreciation information regarding others whom we have overlooked.  lf anybody ' in Ada thinks that the Ham-Ramsey meeting is going to be a small affair, he should take a stroll down Rennie avenue north to Ninth street or down Broadway to Ninth and a half a block east and he will observe some things going on down there that will make him sit up an take notice.  The monster cotton shed that is located at that corner, built to take  care of thousands of bal* of cot-, , ett4 anJ  , g read for travel  ton. has undergone r l v,£    ; 1  of all kines, says the county clerk.  a "week f alto would hai^ly recognize I ^* le  «"*» in Char*. of W. W.  BYNG ROAD TO RIVER READY EOR TRAVEL  The road from Ada to Byng and on to the river near Byng has been  Probably one of file most gigantic oil promotion companies ever organized in this part of the coun-' try is that of the Nu-Mex Oil Co., composed chiefly of Ada business mea. with headquarters at Portales, New Mexico.  Th lr- company has secured leases on several thousand acres of land ; n New Mexico, near Portales, and lr organized on a basis that insures I early development of their property, and development in a way that insures the financial safety of every man engaged in the venture if th“ir property pans out as the geologist! and the members of the company contemplate and verily believe.  Tile company is composed of some of the very best business men of the city, all of whom are above reproach in every way and every man  him that a woman was in the waiting room of the depot apparently in a dying condition. Mr. Rawls made a speedy trip to the depot to investigate and look after the .  a ,    .    .... .woman, As soon, as he    arrived  from the excruciating thralldom of pleasure that I do proclaim the    there he called a physician, but bedebt, our wealth flowing in from week of July    Fourth as ‘For j f ore  the doctor arrived the woman  our    boundles*    crops    and    the    miner-    France Week’ and beseech that the    had breathed her last, Shelton’s  citizens of this    state who already    undertaking establishment was  have sent their sons to the aid of I called and took the body of the France shall novr give a little more    woman to their place of business  pause    for    a    moment    and consider'    of their time and their money to ;    where it now rests awaiting ideo-  our    less    fortunate    brethren    of the!     ,hp salvdg ? °{ ‘^ e  j 10 ?!? °, f „  our     tlfication. The physician states that  preservers in the land of the lily.    he does not know whether the  “Given under my hand with the    woman was poisoned or died from  Great Seal of the State hereunto    sickness,  tions    among these    are    the    citizens'    attached this 20th day of    June, The night agent at the    Frisco,  of Brave France, the simple, cour-' A. D. 1919.    Mr. J. T. Howell, reports that the  ageous    people who    withstood    the    (Signed! J. B. A. Robertson,    j woman came to the ticket window  ravages    of    a savage    host    for    four    Governor of the State of Okla-    at about o clock this morning      o  .    and asked when she could get a  yay,    un,I saved    th,    aor!,I    f,6m    horn...-  (() Su]phur He told    her  ,„ e   train left in the afternoon.    She ex  pressed regret that she had to w T ait so long, and took a seat in the waiting room. She told Mr. Howell that she had come to Ada from Coalgate, arriving on the early morning train. He noticed that she was pale, as if sick, but so many people come and go with different afflictions that he paid no more attention to her after she had taken her seat in the building.  Miss Anna Bell Glenn, the day By the Associated Press    I operator, came to the depot at  PARIS, June 23.—Shortly before; about 7 o’clock and noticed the 7 o’clock tonight a big French of-    woman, but gave her little attention,  ficial limousine stopped in front of    Miss Glenn soon left for her break-  the French foreign office and from    fast and it was in her absence that  it emerged a grave-faced, imniacu-    the porter came to sweep the depot  latelv-dressed man, with a 1-ath r    and found the woman in the condi-  portfolio under his arm.    tion stated.  He was manifestly expected, for a Chief Rawls and Mayor Kitchens j    number of French officials stood at    have bee* working on the case of  i    the curb and bowed him courteously    the woman today endeavoring to  Addressing    into the big building, straight to the    I identify her and find her relatives.  Germans Agree to Sign the Peace Treaty, But Frown A t the Conditions Imposed  IHE GERMAN PREMIER FLAYS PEACEMAKERS  By tin* Associated Press BERLIN, June 24  pron*.I in every way ana every man    German    National    Assembly    a’     office    in which most of th *'  peace The >'  called up the sheriff at Coal *  of whom are financially and other-  ,h « German National Assembly at  treAty has 5een wr jtten.    I    gate,    who    learned    that she left  wise responsible for anything they Weimar yesterday, in reference to The man was Haniel von Haim- there this morning and who is now  might undertake.  the matter of unconditional stir- hausen, the first German permitted making an effort to ascertain who  a « rrr    “‘J    Vnrtnn    ‘Hid Henrv Krnth wag    me    mallei Ui urn unuiuun.u oui .muavu,    muling    till    -ituii iu a.oeei ion  it 'n its present state as being the ■ ° • Some of ^ promoters have beeen  d    h     treaty    provis-    '<>     I ’ a,is  ® i " ce  hl  Aug " s ':  19 Tj:i» he is and find her  I elatlvea '  sam* pla-e. It has been thorough-) 1 ;; 01 ^ 111  /"  iro,u     kIIv,     on the  ground in New Mexico for     v     He brought with him Germany s The woman seemed to ne  Iv cleaned out and in the place of |     l> '     T1,e    men    v ' n0    a    e    n ! several days, and several other mem-j  ions * Diviner Lustre Bauer said = last word- announcement that she 30 years of age. She was  cotton bales row upon row of corn-}     tliere wlUl f heir teams  berS the compRDy w uj i eaV e for j that “A defeated nation is being j will sign unconditionally, but with plainly dressed in a pink cotton  foriable seats—enough    to seat  and  ^novels are about ready to  the    |h(1     j att er    part    of    this    violated    body    and    soul    to    the    hor-    the mental reservation tha* it is dress and looks as if she were the  about  very  AT  I O’CLOCK EKIS P. Kl.  3,500 people—have been built. In the front of the vast auditorium, which the erstwhile cotton shed  corne in.    week. The drilling rig has been Kror or the entire world. Let us sign,” a “peace of violence”    and that she) wife of a laborer.  Ii i.s said Ely all who travel this 1   s hjpp 0 d, together with all the neces- he continued, “but it is our hope to I signs under duress.  which in- cov-B.w  VV „ WM      roat l     rliat    lt    tfie     ‘ n    t * 1<1     foun-     sarv     equipment for development the last breath that this attempt Haimhausen, who is actin-; Get*-1  muu now be called, a monster plat-  ty ai,d d(,zens C)f oar8 us *‘  d  •' work, and negotiations are in prog-; against her honor may one day re-  man  plenipotentiary at Versailles,,  form. capable of seating 250 sing-j  no ' v in  ? oin K  f o  t he river fishing ; re8g with a  driller. The company ers and then leaving room enough  and ,)oan,1Lr an(i to v,slt  Uyng  an( l : states. that actual drilling will bete place another choir of equal!  the  river bridge. size, has been constructed.  coil against its authors.”  Thi big affair planned for many weeks by the Ada Masons will be staged ai 7 o’clock this evening at the First Baptist church. We are informed bv the officers of the lodge that the program for the evening is one of the best ever prepared for any kind of an event in Ada.  Promptly at 7 o’clock a sumptuous repast will be served, to be followed by a program of very ^ligh character, which was printed in the Evening News of Monday. W T e are asked to urge that every one be present at the appointed hour.  ——................——*—■—" " —•  John Gardner Gets Rack.  John Gardner, one of the pioneer citizens of Ada, a good friend of the News and everybody else in the city, after rambling for some time as many of the rest of us have done, settles down in Ada again and pronounces it the best town in the United States—certainly the best in Oklahoma.  Mr. Gardner is associated with the Georgia State Savings Association and for some time has been located in Tulsa. He had his choice of staying in Tulsa or taking one of a half dozen other good cities in the state, but decided on Ada. He has opened offices here and is ready to do business for his company. John is a live wire and we welcome him back home.  The lumber which has been used in the inside of the tabernacle would reach, if the pieces were placed end to end, a distance of 35,000 feet. This would furnish a board walk for one from here to j Oakman, to Ahlosa and Union Valley, almost to Center and Franks, j It would circle Ada a time or two and looks, in the pile, like a considerable lumber yard itself. #  Contrary to the common impression that the shed is a warm place,  I it is delightfully cool and will probably remain, so to everybody unless it be to the fellow whose conscience becomes very ranch awake under the lashings of the gospel. To him,    .....  perhaps. I! will- be about the hot-    T,  test place od earth.    LONDON,    June  Great preparations are being made for the comfort of large congregations. Strings of electric lights will turn night into day literally. The large rostrum will accommodate a large choir of the  F  Y  gin just as soon as the material and equipment is unloaded on the ground.  Being composed as it is, of our friends and fellow citizens, the News wishes the company every possible success.  LONDON FADERS SAY GERMANY COULD NOT RE TRUSTED DURING WAR, NOR EVEN NOW.  OOSH , I HATE TA V4AFT* WtNlHUN IT, &UT ON8 OP NOU6S MOS* VALUKO *ue-eCRlbtai MAK KKROOT ALL ‘boot NtR PARKNNI MATS TA STOP «T ALL'TVlAT.I 00*1 DANN OOM IT rf - NNC OOTTA KER NA OON'f OLI* UK kPltCl  ow Cm amok. agaty quick**.  had received the note from the • Bauer government by wireless from I Weimar, notified the Frenc 1 for-1 eign office by telephone and was permitted personally to deliver it.  J. F.  KILLED ACCIDENTALLY  WEIMAR. June 23.—The nation-    _  a1 assembly this afternoon voted  to sign the peace terms uncondition- The sheriff’s department was no-  ally, the government having sue- rifled this afternoon that J. F. Web-  ceeded in oveicoming the opposi-’    ..___.    __ T>  .  tion of those who insisted on two  er »  0 es m  Yvock\ Chap-conditions.    * el community, accidentally killed  - himself    this    morning.    The    affair  WASHINGTON, June 24.—A dis-  SEXATE TAKES DEFINITE STEFS patch to the state department from j TODAY IjOOKIXG TO tiOOD ROADS LEGISLATION AT KARLY DATE.  - Profound  distrust of Germany is the predominant note in all London press comment on the German government’s decision to sign the peace treaty unconditionally.  It is contended by the London „    .    newspapers that Germany proved  best singers of this part or the j ierge jf utterly treacherous and un-  Jacob Pelter has recently purchased the Lancaster    building  Mr. and Mrs. Pelter dre so delighted with Ada that Vti‘J have decided 10 make this their remanent home. rhev will continue I to do businees it their old stand fjj»r the present.  country and a juvenile choir of such proportions as has never be-fore been attempted in Ada.  If it had been necessary to build from the ground up what Ada . will have when this tabernacle Is completed, it would have called for between 40,000 and 50,000 feet of lamber and would have entailed an expense of several hundreds of dollars. It is a big thing; you might take the time to look it up.  Frank J. Cobeldick arrived here today with his discharge en route to his home in Stratford. Mr. Gobeldick has served one year in France with the 90ith Division of the 315 Ammunition Train.  reliable throughout the whole period of the war, and that the sinking of interned vessels in Scapa Flow was the latest evidence of that miserable trait.  Even • after the treaty is signed, the papers assert, the allies must be continually on guard until the last penalty is paid. '•  Germany finds herself a victim of the old adage, “The truth itself is not believed, by one who often has deceived.”  By the Associated Press  WASHINGTON, Juqe 24. — The first definite steps looking to the drafting of general road legislation was taken today by the senate interstate commerce committee.  In authorizing the sub committee, headed by chairman Cummings, to draft tentative bills, Senator Cumings said he hoped to submit  was reported by Ed Chapman.  the Amebean peace commission  at  |    ^Y eb ~  Paris said the Germans had beer.;*    ^    "as    tut    hunting  instructed to sign the treaty, but it 1     Ue .*? a ?Z? er     I , gun was   did not state at what time they ~     g ®?     W1 . th    the    fatal     result,  were expected to sign.    urther    <    etails    are    lacking.  PARIS, June 24.—In declaring its    Country's Dark Days.  intention to accept and sign the The saying, “not worth a continen-  peace terms the government of the tai.** came from the fact that the con-  German republic has sent the fol- j tlnental currency, issued by the contl-  lowing note to M. Clemenceau, pres- j ien t a | congress, was worthless, or  ! dpn ' O'    Pf are     <-°. 1 fere„ce.     d     ,     h     revolution    rmd  through Dr. Haniel von Haihausen:  1 J   “The minister of foreign affairs  after. As the continental congress  to your excellency the following: the measure within a month and j “‘It appears to the government of  Nothing has yet been learned of the whereabouts of John Berton King, who so mysteriously disappeared Saturday night, June 15th,! Cloudy is the best the weather at the Katy depot.    i    man can promise Wednesday.  has instructed me to communicate  hnd no  P° wer  1° tuxes it was unable to redeem Its promises to    pay.  Besides, the country was flooded    with  that    further    hearings might be held! the German republic in consterna-    counterfeits which could not be do-  at    an    early    date.    tion at the last communication of    teeted.  the allied and associated govern- j    _  raents that these governments have.  decided    to    wrest    from    Germany    by    Thoae With Enterpriae.  force,    acceptance    of    the    peace    con-;    The enterprising person is the    perditions even those which without    §on who is always learning and then  presenting any material significance,    putting that learning to use, who is  aim at divesting the German people     ma ki ng  the very best of opportunity.  Canada's Water Power.  An important feature of the water powers of Canada is their fortunate situation with respect to existing commercial centers. Within economic transmission range of practically every Important city from the Atlantic to the Pacific, except those In the central western prairies, there are clustered water-power sites which will meet the probable demands for hydropower for generations.  Let a Want Ad get it for you.  of their honor.  “ ‘No act of violence can touch the honor of the German people, after frightful suffering in these last years, have 110 means of defending themselves by external action.  “ ‘Yielding to superior force, and without renouncing in the meantime its own views of the unheard-  (Continued on °age Eight.)  and creating all the opportunities which seem to offer themselves to his or her molding. In other words, what is enterprise but a busy mind and a busy person properly directed by a sane soul.  It will pay you to watch the Want Ad columns of the News.   

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