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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: June 20, 1919 - Page 1

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Location: Ada, Oklahoma

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - June 20, 1919, Ada, Oklahoma                             VOLUME XVI. The Scheidem Germany Crumbl Fatal Fall Wyoming, for Years An Oasis In the Desert, Goes Dry July First Anyway Government On Trail of Anarchists, toStrikeSoon; Police to Watch July 4 ARMY AliaiKX OX LOOKOIT KOK KUKTHKB OXVTBHKAHs OX PART OF VILLA .BANDITS. liv tin- AssocliiU'il 1'ress EL PASO, Tex.. June j aircraft began patrolling the border yesterday when one of the big biplanes, after circling the city started west along the boundary, line. It Is reported that these air-1 planes, equipped with machine guns and bombing apparatus, are pre-1 pared to cross into Mexico after the Yillistas. if ordered. Carrar.za officials at Jaurez have ordered all civilians to deliver their firearms to military headquarters I and have issued proclamations in- j tended to quite the citizenry and influence better feeling toward thej Americans. American Consul E. A, Dow esti- mated today that 650 Americans are in the territory toward which the ViUistas are said to be heading. Villa is said to have stopped at Villa Ahumada to attend his broth-1 er, Hipollto Villa, who is reported seriously ill. American troop movement 01 considerable size was started yes-j terday toward the Mexican border, from "Fort Bliss. Military headcjuar- j ters were reticent concerning the movement but it is believed to be, simply a move in maneuvers started i early this week. MRS. KLLKX CHOATK i PASSES AWAY TODAY Cheyenne, Wyo., June om'ns Ions the oasis of this sec- tion 'of 'the west, will enter the ranks of prohibition states on July 1. Sale nncl manufacture of liquor within the state will cease on that date regardless of waethor national prohibition is effective in the na- tion. Under U-MUS of 'the constitutional amendment adopted by the voters at last November's election, Wyoming would have pone dry January 1, 1920. When the legislature met last January, however, it was deemed advisable to put the state law into effect July 1, this year, at the same time that it appeared nation- al war time prohibition would be effective. A law was passed by the legislature authorizing this. In addition to the power placed by state law in the hands of a state prohibition commissioner, there will be a Law Enforcement League, privately financed and pri- vaely operated to enforce the new law." This league, already has De- gun the work of keeping Wyoming free of illegal manufacture and sale of liquor after July 1. State bouse gossip i? (that Fred L. Crabbe, now superintendent of the Yyoming Anti-saloon League, .will be chosen Prohibition Com- missioner. "Not only bootlegging but com- mercial traffic in liquor must cease in accordance with the wishes of j the said Mr. Crabbe In a 1 statement to The Associated Press. "Tho voters gave the largest per capita dry majoriy of any state in the union and are going to i see that the law will be enforced. The law as passed by -the legisla- i ture is one of the most drastic of its kind." Saloons in Wyoming now pay a combined revenue of for privilege of operating. In the face of Ihe approaching "dry spell breweries are turning to other lines. Most of them will manufac- ture "soft" drinks. Data gathered In the three larg- est elides in the Casper and vlr- tually every barroom tvnd saloon has been spoken 'for by proprietors of candy shops, soft drink parlors, cafes, niuslc stores and restaurants. Saloon men are cleaning out their stocks as rapidly as possible. It is stated with authority, that re- spectable citizens of the state who lay in a moderate supply of liquor now for their own use after July 1 will not bo molested, but the au- thoittes have announced there will be eternal and vigilant warfare waged on 'the man who seeks to buy- now and sell later. Mail order business practically is ait a standstill, tne Reed Law having stopped much of the impor- tation Info nearby states. WILL XOT ASK RELEASE OF POLITICAL PRISONERS COX- VKTKD UNDER WAR TIME MEASURES. IT IS BELIEVED THAT THE FAIL- URE OP THE SCHEIDEMANN REGIME INSURES TREATY PACT. By the AsBociated Press PARIS, June re- ports concerning changes in the German cabinet are prema- >of a group TRAIL OF 24lt individuals has not been learned June The they are said, to have been in New tTn the scent York for two weeks before and the of lawless men in the tin- Assoclnti'il Press" ATLANTIC CITY, N. J., June 20. The American Federation of La- j bor, in annual convention here, has 1 refused to ask for the release of so-called political and industrial prisoners convicted under the espi- onage and other time acts. It did, however, pass a resolu- tion asking that the government Repeal these acts with the coming The action of the federation will no doubt go a long way toward al- laying the agitation for a nation- wide demonstration on July Fourtn which has been partially planned by radicals as a protest against the imprisonment of Mooney, Debs and other labor leaders. Here's Where Ada Gets Sure "Nuff" German Cannon UL it feiwuf United States which constitutes the source of recent demonstrations of anarchy, including the wholesale mailing of bombs to officials and private citizens, the more recent at- tempt to slay Attorney General Pal- mer at his hOine here and simultan- eou's bomb outrages of the country. J. Flynn, in other cities chief of the .Jn of the De- announced last i v night that he was certain his de partrnent had established the source of the bomb outrages. On RifilU Track. know we are on the right said efter he- Attorney Gen- Assistant Attorney J'We are going to clean up this nest. It will take a little time, but the mystery will soon be solved.' 1 Chief Flynn disclosed a few -Im- that his force I Qrii. 1U1 I W (_> W haunts of the anarchists are known. Descriptions Obtained. "We do not know their identity now but we have accurate descrip- tions of both Chief Flynn said: "The witnesses can identify the second man, who rushed from the scene immediately after the ex- plosion. I think he lost his nerve, and left town immediately." Chief Flynn. said there may a few more bombs thrown be the government can close in on the anarchists, but he was confident there would be a wholesale round- up within a reasonable time. to July he-said, "I .be "We Chief Flynn had conferred with eral Palmer anc General Garvan. portant revelations has made. Mrs Ellen Choate, age 2o. wife of J P. Choato, died at their home, 401'.N Oak. at one o'clock a. m. todnv. Funeral services will be held" at the borne Saturday after- noon by Rev. Oscar Hays. Inter- ment will be made at the Rosedale cemetery. Mrs. Choate has been a resident of Ada for the past nine years, in which time she has made many friends. She leaves her husband and three children, two girls and one boy, five, seven and nine respectively. Mrs James Tomlmson of san- sabe, Texas, and .Mrs. Elvin Wells from that place, who is a sis- ter of Mrs. Choate, also Mrs. A. J. House of Browr.wood. Texas, a sis- ter of Mr. Choate. are expected to arrive here today to attend, the fun- eral services on tomorrow. Mr. P. Nut Loses Place In Nut World, Decision of Some Nutty Expert LAST HPT By A. M. J3. Speaking of js a nut not a nut? it's a peanut. Some wise colonel, or other au- ithority on HUTS, has just made the 'startling statement that peanuts are 'not nuts. Certainly nut, They sim- ply belong to the common pea or bean family! Just think of It! The official monkey food, tho circus lover's pop- ular pastime, and .the popcorn man's standby lias been relegated into a class with the vegetarian's exclusive diet of culinary herbs. When this r.ews reached the ears ncic nearn of the large monkey family in the clV park zoo. they became _ ,3 il. i.- m rttMl- Fire of unknown origin burned the garage and automobile stored therein of Dr. Meredith at 520 West Fourteenth street, this morn- 1 inK The fire caught some time after 12 o'clock and the fire boys were called out about The The News is just in receipt of i the copy ot a bill introduced in the House on June 14, by Hon. Tom D. McKeown, authorizing the sec- retary of war to donate to the city of Ada a German field piece as a souvenir. The bill Is known as H. R. 5S45, and reads as follows: A Bill. Authorizing the Secretary of War to donate to the city of Ada, i Pontotoc County, in (the State of Oklahoma, one German cannon or fielflpiece. Be, It ea acted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Con- cress assembled, that: the Secretary of War be, and lie Is hereby, au- ithovized and directed to donate to 'the city of Ada. Pontotoc County, State o'f Oklahoma, one cannon or fieWplece captured -by the American Army from the forces of the Imper- ial German Government during the present vrar. Two witnesses who saw the man who annihilated himself In throwing the bomb at the Palmer house, one minute before the explosion oc- curred, have been found. A sec- lond man was seen with the bomb i thrower, the second man also car- rytAlSthoushP'the identity of these have no persraaficnowledge. I can say that police departments of all cities, however, are keeping a close watch." ________ PRESIDENT AND PARTY RETURNS FROM BELGIUM By the Associated Frpss "PARIS, June Wil- son and party arrived here this morning at 9 o'clock after a two day trip to Brussels and the war zone in Belgium. There was no formal reception. Mr. Wilson drove imme- diately to the Paris White House. He had a good night's rest last night and said he was not tired. He expressed much enjoyment on the trip. ture, says an official German wireless message from Nauen at 1 o'clock this afternoon. The message adds that the Na- tional Assembly faiiled to get a majority of its members to favor signing the peace terms. PARIS, June Scheide- mann government in Germany 'has fallen, is the leport coming to Paris today. News of the event, report- ed during the' morning, was con- firmed later' by military advices through Coblez from both Weimar and Berlin. The downfall of the Scheidemann government was made known to the American peace delegation here this morning. This event is believed here to assure the signing of the peace treaty oy Germany at an early date as Scheidemann, the premier, was'understood to be the chief op- ponent to the acceptance of the re- vised peace terms. It is also understood here that Muskogee Streetcar Strike No Nearer Settlement Now Than Three Weeks Ago MUSKOGBE, June With both sides to the strike deaf to all over- I turcs and with the city's receiver- ship action 'as yet uncertain, Mus- kogee today faced a transportation tie-up that may not tie untangled for several or weeks. Today marked the close or the third wlthput car service weeks 'full bickering, talking, haggling, confer- encos and a persistent lack of defl- i nite action. Union men, company of- ncers and the public officials now STRIKE OK SEWER WORK the fall of the Scheidemann govern- ment entails the fall also Presi- dent Ebert, of the [National As- sembly. The Assembly prob- ably will take measures to select a successor to Herr Ebert. Up to noon today there was no official confirmation that Herr Noske was forming a new government. French official Information on the German situation is to the same general effect as that received by the American delegation. French advices carry the information, or rather the impression, that the na- tional assembly is favorable to sign-. i ing the peace treaty. It is reported" here that the Germans have asked for further time limit within which. to act on the treaty matter. Since, the Allies handed Germany their- ultimatum several days ago, how- ever, it is not thought that any further extension, of time will be granted. v An Exchange Telegraph dispatcn, from Paris to London this morn- ing states that the National Assem- bly at Weimar has accepted the terms of the peace treaty. JOHN W. MURRAY DIES AT 016 14TH Fifteen men employed the con- tracting firm of Comstock Hanson of Tulsa, who 'are laying the sew-, the new district in North AT CEMENT PLAHT I 1 llv i loss The doctor stated this morn- ing that he aid not know whether the place was, insured or not. The i loss was about The car Iwas a Grant Six. The residence ol cy dignant and not only roasted pea- nuts in general, but also the nut who declared that a peanut is not A vender whose sale of peanuts If Tom would only add an amendment to this bill giving Ada a federal building we would have a good place to put the cannon. it might be all right.- however, to 1 place it In the court yard when the new county court house is erect- ed. At any rate let us have the can n DTI. It was reported to the News today that a strike took place at the local cement plant on Wednesday of this week. A reporter was sent to in- vestigate the report and he gath- ered the following information. Sheriff Duncan, when asked about the strike, said: -We were called to the cement plant Wednesday in answer to a call from the management that they were expecting trouble with some of the men employed on the new buildings. We were told that about men were to strike for an in- crease of wages. However, this number did not strike, but only about ten men went out. We were told they were receiving 35 cents per houf for ten hours work and Jhey asked for 40 cents, which was refused by the company, thus the walkout. We had no trouble with the men. chandler_ manager of the cement company, when asked for a statement today, replied as follows "We have had no trouble with our men, I am thankful to say. And T hope we do not have. We are nearly up with our work on the new bulging 'now and simply derid- ed to -lay otf a few of the surplus SfborersT which was done. There wa8 no strike. Alter the men had been laid we were afraid one or two would try. to cause dissat- isfaction among the others and -we Sy caCd in the officers to pre- vent trouble should any arise! did not even know that the men had been laid off until this morning." i Ci v Trio Ol nv-j- Iwas a Grant Six. me itsi H-IKA- enough to indicate that ithe doctor saved by the effi-1 f of monkey cient work of the firemen. j clt.zV states rsfin 3r.nechan.es and but whence sto. .consider th. tractor engineering._______ i a bean, then one has the explana- I people of America, nolseless- jlyor ofhenvise. devour 'worth of peanuts, or bushels, annually, which only goes to prove that this industry is a "shell" game. i The high value of the peanut as i a muscle-building food should be an I Inducement for mothers to raise I day, IlCei'S IvDU. I. lie yuunv, gj-g jrj LllU Jlli W uioti rvi. j are apparently in a bitterer and less I went off on a strike 1 conciliatory mood than ever, Possibility of a hearing on the receivership pertitio3 tlris week was almost the last straw of hope for a quick adjustment, though some clunc to the hope that Chairman yester- cu Claude E. Connally of the state board of arbitration would be able to accomplish the When asked about the situation today Mayor Kitchen had this to The men struck yesterday and the contractors are up against for help at the present time. wore paying the men 37% At the Ada Play Houses LIBERTY. The Paramount-Artcraft corpor- ation presents Vivian Martin to- nlg-it In a six-act comedy drama, "You Never Saw Such a Most of us have said the same thing time8 about other g and you had better eee this one to 3ee how she comes out. Coming next week, Roquemore's Musical Show, Happy Klarke, Henry Roaue- more, Hlwalian Bill. American. The Metro Picture Corporation presents the great Nazlmoya In "Eye Ifor Eye." Seven gorgeous acts. Nazlmova Is known the most w.onderful actress In the-world and you win have-an ovportunity to judge this qu.-'Btlon for yourself. See the opening performance to- night. n peanut-butter babies. As a nut, Mr. P .Nut is -now in a class with that, famous old gen- eleraan. Mr. J. Barleycorn! INFORMAL PARTY FOR STUART ANDERSON Lawrence Anderson was host at an informal evening of dancing and games given at the home of Mrs. Owen iFaunt Le Roy, 410 E. Main Thursday evening, complimenting -his brother.' Stuart 'lust returned yesterday from France. present were Misses Fay Merrltt, Marie .Jackman, Marguerite Anderson, Esther Tobias and Leta Mo'rgah Nora FHtzpatrlck and Alma Pallant; Messrs, Lawrence and -Stuart Anderson, Edgar Allen foe, Roy Stegall 'and Jim Norman. LU w--------M.- the two sides together to talk over body else a d.cMnite agreement. JEFFRIES GOES TO STAGE DRIVING By the Associated Press LOS -ANGELES, Cal., June James J. Jeffries, former champ- ion heavyweight boxer of the world, Is going into the automobile etage business. He has applied to the board of public utilities here for a permit to operate a line between 1 this city and Burbank about nine miles from here. The hoard will act on the application In a few Jeffries he intended his They cents p'er'ho'ur, -which is more than body else pays for labor, but the men asked 45 cents. The contrac- tors offered th'eni 40 cents, but they would not accept it." It seems that the contractors can not get the help and this will prob- ably halt the sewer work for the present. Final Flashes John W. Murray, aged 3S died at his home at 616 West 14th street yesterday at P. M. He leaves a wife and two small children. In- terment tMs afternoon at Bebee. Mr. Murray moved here with his family last September from Mis- souri, since which time he has been employed at the cement plant. LABOR PARTY PLANS REJECTED BY HEADS ATLANTIC CITY, N. J., June 19. suggestion that American or- ganized labor form a political party was rejected unanimously today by the American Federation of Labor, in convention here. Labor's reconstruction program, which has been termed a "new dec- vtr. llaration of Independence for work- A P ot was adopted j through a resolution -that "labor ______ now insists on full value and corn- on Ipensation for services rendered, on a basis that will enable all to enjoy COPENHAGEN, June Czecho-Slovak republic was today WEATHEft FORECAST. Friday and Saturday generally cloudy for this section, says the weather man of Saturday's pros- pects. line to carry both freight and pas- sengers but ithe former would make up the bulk of the business. His machines will carry milk and garden produce, the ex-champion said. Also the boxer asked for a per- mit to drive, saying that he might want -to "sit In on a pinch." ITALIAN DELEGATION WILL ACCEPT TERMS OF ALLIES By the Associated Press PARIS. June Italian delegation to the peace conference has been directed from Rome to accept the proposition for settlement of the Dalmatian controversy, made by Premiers -Lloyd George and- President Wilson, -ac- cording -to the Paris office' of Reu- ters, Limited. Drop In with bits and get blue print inap of Pontotoc County. News. tf proclaimed, a Budapest message says. Cabinet to Remain. WEIMAR, June Ger- man cabinet, although it resigned, will continue in office temporarily until President Ebert shall have been able to form a new one. Many Killed by Fire. SAN JUAN, June hun- dred an fifty persons are reported killed or injured by fire In a mo- tion picture theatre last night, Changes In German Cabinet. GOBLENZ, June Noske, minister, of defense, will-suc- ceed' Piailllp as head of-'tne German ministry, according to.'a Weimar dispatch. Mathlas. Er'zb'erger of the German.'armistice commlflBlon will succeed .Count von Brockdorff-Rantzau, as foreign sec- retary. the higher things of life rather than merely exist near the line beyond which we find human misery.' The convention adopted also the report censuring congress for maK- Ing "niggardly appropriations for the department of labor, declaring that congress, having given larger appropriations to the department of commerce and agriculture, "has shown that It considers the welfare of financial interests and cattle above that of human beings.' SENATE NAVAL COMMITTEE INCREASES AVIATION FUND By the Associated Prcus WASHINGTON, June. few >otes the senate na- .yal committed-decided to recommend ah increase in the naval aviation fund for 1920-from fifteen million to-thirty-five million as re- quested ,br Secretary Daniels. Let a Want Ad sell it for you.   

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