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Ada Evening News: Wednesday, June 18, 1919 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News (Newspaper) - June 18, 1919, Ada, Oklahoma                                 The Man Who Licked the Frost Off the Cake at the Bates-Griffin Wedding This Morning Ought to Be "Cited'' For Braverg in Action!  Whegfoa Cerning Jletos;  VOLUME XVI. NUMBER 83  ADA, OKLAHOMA, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 18, 1919  TWO CENTS THE COPY  Sportsmen Elated Over Defeat of Bill in Ohio Legislature  :: i ii 1111111 n 1111 n r 11111 t n       *********    *«********* ..............************* it n »»> rn *****************************  IO I ALLIES  Marshal Foch Assembles Troops Preparatory to a Resumption of War  MARKS MM KHO VS HIU) VIS IO NS WHICH SHK DERMS ESSENTIAL BERO HK SK« XI Mi PEACE TH KATA'.  A ustralia’s Scheme to A id  By (Im* Associated Press C | I •    Tt^o4    WEIMAR,    June 18.—No state-  dOlClierS HGSI ment has yet been issued by the  German cabinet on the reply of the - Allies to the German counter proposals. The Associated Press has DNL\, June 18.    Austialia is J |mrn®d,    however, that    the    senti-  prepared to settle 20,000 soldiers,  Illen ^  0 f    the cabinet    is    almost  on the land    j    unanimously against signing the  And she is prepared    to give each |  treaty   advances ranging up to $5,700 for  By the Associated Pre**  COBLENZ, June IS. — The concentration of troops preparatory to advancing into Germany if the Ger-    ___mans    refuse to sign    the terms of  peace will begin on Wednesday By the Associated Presa    *    throughout all the occupied area.  PARIS, June 18.—Here is a sum- Orders to this effect were received mary    of    the    German    reply to th    today    from Marshal    Foch. compesce    treaty    proposed    by the Vat-    mander-in-chief of the    allied armies,  sallies conference:    who sent similar orders to all the  Reparations.    allied forces ^ German soil.  German 1  accepts responsibility Lieutenant-General Hunter Lig-only for civilian losses in the Bel- gen. commander of American forces gian and French areas occupied by \ n  the Coblenz area, said today her in the "iar. She agrees to pay  a f ter an  inspection trip of the  not more than $25,000,000,000 pro- bridgehead outposts and the head-,    , lflorv   vided her other counter proposals quarters of divisions along the purchase of stock and machinery, are accepted. Characterizing the a1- nhine that the American forces Thats how well Australia tnmw lied plan    for    a reparations commis-     we re    all ready to move ahead at  ol  returning fighting men.  sion as infringing on German sov-  a m oment’s notice. Leaves to sol- Her scheme to aid the soldiers is erignty, she proposes a “co-opera- diers, permitting them to visit rec- declared the best and most concretive German commission”    to    work     r eation points within the American    hensive yet evolved. British author-  alongside the allied body.    zone, have all been suspended until    ities agree in this.  Occupation.    it is known whether the Germans    The provision of land under this  She demands, in words of bitter accept or reject the peace con- scheme, the construction of rail- j protest that all allied troops be ditions.    ways and roads to open it up and  withdrawn within six months of the    orders    come to go ahead, the the advances for stock and machin-  signing of pqace.    Americans will advance in combat     eTy  are calculated to require an  Negotiations.    formation prepared for any emerg-    outlay of $200,000,000.  She insists she has a    right    to     ency wilh  the artillery and supply    Besides this land program—  oral discussion of the practical ap- trains following close    upon thej The government will expend  plication cf the principles upon the heels of the infantry  acceptance of which by her and her    --  enemies she *aid down her arms.  Saar.  Purely German territory. She claims important industrial districts beyond the coal mines is demanded  IT IS BELIEVED BV ASSOCIATED PRESS REPRESENTATIVES THAT THE GERMANS WILL NOT SIGN.  French Hope Huns Refuse To Sign So Essen Mag Be Given Rheims Treatment  It seems that the main objection of the Germans to signing the treaty is the fear of Bolshevism and chaos in their own country as a result of such action. The German people are against the treat} police in the larger cities, and the leaders fear their wrath if the treaty is signed.  Tom Thomas Has A Most Unique “ Trouble Car  Tom A. Thomas, who runs the Service Garage at 212 W. 12th street, has the most unique ‘‘trouble car” yet seen in these parts.  The car is a Buick 37 wrhich has been remodeled with a body adapt  or the Associated Press  PABIS, June 17. — A sharp division of opinion was found today in the comment on the redrafted treaty by Parisian newspapers:  “Small delays show' the big four incapable of settling even insignificant details on a basis of pure right,” declared the Matin. “We hope the Germans will not sign. It will enable us to do to Esgen what  the boches did to Rheims.  “The reply d#es not weaken France's fundamental demands,” said the Petit Journal.  The Journal said: “The language  BIG FIGHTERS GETTING READY FOR THE WILLARD-DEMPSEY BATTLE AT TOLEDO,  J FLY 4TH.  Ham-Ramsey A rrangements A Imost Complete  ed to the purpose, and which has ^  re ply is strong, but the terms back    step, seats and    rail on the     contain real  concessions,  rear    resembling very    much a pa-     The  j^bo de Paris:  trol w agon like those used by the ; ceau’s letter covering the treaty is  the strongest indictment    of    Ger-  The car is painted a straw' tan,     many . It contrasts strikingly with  and painted in red are the various    the weakness shown by the nego-  signs of the firm, telephone num-    tiations by the big four.”    ,    working hard under the  bT.    Pie. On I hp front, just below    -Real concessions have    been    ® a,t     ° f     I    scorchlne    sun    There  the    wind shield. Is    the Ada or    made,” states the Figaro,    "but    Ger-i  heat    of    a    scorchln 8     sun -     lnere   By tho Associated Press  TOLEDO, Ohio, June 18. — Tex .Rickard, promoter of the heavyweight championship contest . between Jess Willard and Jack Dempsey here July 4, today expressed his satisfaction over the defeat of the bill in the Ohio legislature last night, which if passed would have empowered Governor Cox to prevent the match.  Willard today received word from “Steamboat Bill” Scott, a light heavyweight, w T ho has just returned from France, expressing his willingness to join the champion’s staff of sparring partners immediately upon his discharge from the service at Camp Sherman. Scott formerly was a sparring mate of Willard’s. He returned from France holding the Championship honors of the Sixth division.  Admirers of Dempsey are surprised over the weight of the challenger, who tipped the scales yes-Clpmen- terday at 201 pounds, wearing only his trunks and boxing shoes. None of them believed Dempsey weighed within ten pounds of that figure as they thought he had reduced to his lowest possible weight as a re-  The I nuoy' do.. ... ™.»e ,h,    |    ™‘.fSS  JUNE NOE POPULAR MONTH LOR  double A city monogram. machine is not only designed to be of guarantees and reparations.” useful, hut it is ornamental as w F ell.  The box seats running length-! wise are the car tool boxes, and in them are carried all jacks and other tools necessary for trouble  I $100,000,000 for public works, on which soldier labor will be given  preference.  It makes an allowance to maintain each soldier and his family,  !  j lf he bas one. till he gets work  from her. but “even the cession of the mining district could not be admitted.” She is willing to guarantee a supply of coal, “but the total coal computed to exist in the Saar mines would represent a hundred  times the maximum France de- brides, they don’t get married in  me nts funds    _    ,    .    ,     ttlh __  mauds Except for sixty-eight years June around Ada. That is they it will ask only 5 per cent in- ation was added to the executive Ding i ... under Frencu rule, the population haven’t this year, nearly so fast as terest of soldiers on deferred pay- committee and made its vice chair-1 made for he carrying o gasoline,  ha- been attached to Germany tor in other months. Probably they rnents. though the cost to the gov- man.    ,    I    *    " a  7.  a  f     7    •    i*.*!  Reconsid- don't have time as the men folks  ernm ent will be 6 per cent.    I’    was    also agreed to organize emergencies, all of which is nicely  The government will buy and di- fourteen committees with special concealed, giving the car a neat ap-vjde  material to sell to soldiers at cost. I    revival  It w ill give soldiers* 20 to 37    are'to be committees on music,    ush  years to make deferred payments,    ers. delegations, decorations,    per-    getting    on    to    all    the    latest ins  To prevent speculation in these    sonal workers, prayer meetings, j    and    ‘outs    of    the    business,  soldier investments, no transfer is    census of city, entertainment,    pub-  IHE POSTAL COMPANY ATTEMPTS SETTLEMENT  done in the piesence of nearly two score of newspaper men, a great majority of whom believed that the challenger w’ould scale somewhere between 180 and 190 pounds The scales w*ere tested a half dozen I times before Dempsey hopped on I them. The only explanation of Dempsey’s astonishing increase in ; weight is that he thrieves on training! that he hag been permitted to eat what he wished, has been drink-  A Ham-Ramsey ltev*val organza-, purposes.    A metal towing pole,  tion was perfected at a meeting last j equipped with shock absorbers and  It    gives to each    blind soldier a    evening at the    First Christian    so arranged    that it folds back Into I    -  home title clear.    church. Dr J. M.    Gordon was elect-    j    the car. is    attached to the rear.  , It advances anv soldier up to I ed to act as chairman of the orga- The most modern feature is an By tie* Associated Dress w    - rt0 f     house    with    no    ad-    nization. Mr. C. E. Cunning was air storage tank and hose which CHICAGO, June IS.—The Postal ing considerable water and that per-  - von*    Tvivin 1  rn i    *nrnrnm that    chosen secretary and Mr. L. A El-    i    enables Mr.    Thomas to inflate tires    Telegraph    company,    w ith    a    view    to    haps    his    daily    plunge    in    Maumee  In spit,- of all the talk of June calls    for *250,000.000 of Severn-    liao'n. treasurer.    Rev. G. W. Beck    out on the    road, obviating the th-|    , „din K     the    telegraph strike    so    far    as    B* y  h ^% p "*d°of l Scln/l”    ^   v     *—• -----«    I    cessitv of towing cars in flat and that company ;s concerned, sent no- on him insieaa or reducing ii.  Provision is also tice throughout the country this; Willard has a new sparring part-  morning that all strikers would be  t  ner in camp who promises to be or  permitted to return to work with valuable assistance. The^ new addi-  *    -    .    .    i    ♦    A-1__;    ~    T    ^    ^    PIG^    awaiirnt    or  as chairman of the pastors’ associ-  over a thousand years. _____ wk  eration of the w T hole question    is de-    are all too busy now    wiiri    Then  manded.     cro P gathering to think    about    such  Schleswig.    a thing as marrying.  She charges the demarcation for I p to date the records show I s  a plebescite has been traced through licenses issued in June. 4 2 for May, purely German territory and goes 34 in April. 3 9 in March, lebruary further than Denmark herself wishes 2k and January 22. to go.  continuity of .service up to and including June 20. It was not stated  tion is Joe Chip, a middleweight of New Castle, Pa. He is fast, lets his aches fly from all angles and  e government win ouy ana ai- iourieen lomuiiuw#    ............. ----    -    -    -    -    what her or nit the striking telegra- punches fly lr  large estates and buy building duties relating to the co-operative Bearance and leaving tho bed free  4   inteiM j e(1  to consider the pro- haji a dozen times yesterday caught  '    •    Among    these    committees    for passengers or luggage.    |    priers    mienaea    to    cimbia^    y     m     -  Verily, the Ada garage men are P° sal -  the champion with stinging blows to the head and body.  Upper Silesia.  Cession “cannot be demanded a"  • Continl a on Page 8.)  Court News  permitted for five years without lidty. nursery, finance, tabernacle. FR ENGH SAII/ORS ATTTEMTT pons# lit of the government com- etc. Ender these and other heads    JAIL DELIA FRY AT RREST  missioner    the advance work of the campaign BREST, June 18.- Two hunderd  Normal Notes  JEANRE U’ARC IS  MASONS ARE PREPARING EQR NOTEWORTHY AFFAIR  mLsioner    the advance worn ct me campaign    *«,.r    Prof.    C.    VV.    Richards,    superiu-   _______All    benefits    thus    offered    to    sol-    will be whipped into shape this j French sailors, carrying red flags, | Pendent of the schools of Ardmore,  diets    are    open to    widows    of sol-    week and    next.    There is    to be no    attempted    to enter the    naval jail I     was the spea ker at the Normal this  Th# state    jail inspector was in    diets,    to    widowed    mothers    and to    advance    man    for this    campaign    here yesterday    to rescue imprison-     morn i n g. His was the first of a  Ada last week and    inspected the    nurses    who w r ont overseas.    since Mr.    Bumgartner is at the bed    ed sailors,    rho    attempt    failed. No     series o1 ; educational lectures to be  jails at this    place.    He told Mayor    ‘    -------- side of a    very    sick wife.    Much of    casualties.    given during the summer term.  Kitchens that the city jail bereft    .................the advance responsibility is be-]    The    lecture    of    Mr.    Richards    to-  ng saddled on to the chairman of  rAam n  rn mil na Alin    day was one that made a profound  was in first class condition in every way. The city Jail is on the empty list today. The janitor has just given the jail a thorough sr rubbing, and new bi dding is placed on the bunks regularly to make it as comfortable as possible.  MORE MEN WINTERED JOIN BAIL TEAM  F  The ball team had a snappy  Ada Lodge No. 119, A. F. 4c A.  M.. will have a banquet next Tuesday evening in#the parlors of the    ~    "  First Baptist church, to be follow- :     The    commissioners of the city ot  c»d bf an excellent program. The    Ada announce that they are now on     prar tice Tuesday    afternoon.    A  Eastern Star is managing the af-    a deal to place in the local fire'     goo{ j crowd turned    out but we    are  fair and making    preparations for    station    an electric alarm appara-     anx j OU8     that more come    out.    We  the greatest thing    of the kind ever    tus and    sifen bell. It will be so ar-     wanJ  everyone who can    spare    the  staged in Ada.    ranged that when an alarm i.»    time to meet with    us Thursday    af-  The eatables for the occasion will    cd in the telephone operator touches    t ernoon<    are    now  using    the  be furnished by    the individual    a hell    and the siren begins to    j^ ornia i    field for practice and    six  members and their wive*. Any Ma-    scream    in such tones mat it  caa     o'dqck    is the time.  son whose wife has not been call- he heard tor several miles. The ohed upon to prepare something Jcct of course is to give the peo-should get in touch with Mrs. T. E. P»c »n all parts of town warning Brents or Mrs. A. M. Bailey and to clear the streets until the pass-ascertain what is expected of him.    ing of the trucks. The system lai ex-  The program for this meeting    pected to be in operation by Aug-  wili be published in Saturday’s pa-    ust 1st.  the ministerial association. Rev. G.  W. l'«M.'k, and he is handling it in a work man-1 ike manner.  Already the big slic'd is cleared of rubbish and cleaned. Already a contractor is at work on a choir  platform to seat three hundred sing-]    _  ers. It is now’ being seated for five  thousand people and Is declared to I By tin* Associated Dr<<ss be cool and pleasant even at mid-j PARIS, June 18. day.  impression on the faculty and stu-  INJURED AT SEA  By the Associated Press  WASHINGTON, June    18.—A  wireless message received at the navy department at Washington  IRISH PRISONS  E  TO TREATY BEING READ  The team now has more than $200 in the treasury and this is to be used in securing uniforms, and  other equipment. The grounds are i    .    —     being put into firs# class shape  Ity tLe A>w>cUtw | press  and we hope to be* practicing on it soon.  per.  Every member of Ada lodge as    A complaint    has been filed in the    f or  practice yesterday afternoon,  well as all resident Masons whose    district    court    against one Arthur    Judging from the class of ball dis-  membership is elsewhere is expect-    Alcorn,    on a    charge of obtaining    pin vt d by them yesterday, we are  ed to be present and bring his bet-    money    under    false pretenses. Mr.    likely to have some new members  ter half.    i    Alcorn    is    said    to be an itenerant added to our team.  PARIS, June 18.—The Austrian  .     A     ,    observations responding to the  Several new huskies turned out    |     frapmentdry treaty flm  communi  cated to the Austrian delegation, were today undergoing translation for submission to the council of four. They make a document so formidable in size that they cause  picture enlarger and waa here in  VJnU ,  furthpr  announcement we j  wonder regar(1 i n g the length of the  WINE    AND BEER BAN UP    April collecting money and taking     w ju    practice    on the Normal field.  FOR VOTE SATURDAY     or d ers for  Picture work. It is said    grounds    are being cleared of  _ J     'he collected from several people weeds and will be In good shape  and has not delivered the pictures [ when w r e meet again.—Reporter. The    and they have become suspicious,  By the Associated Press  WASHINGTON, June 18.    ^    ,     .    ,  house Judiciary committee agreed U 1UK .  raus A n 7J     C ° Ur     '    PRESIDENT'S    PARTY    TO  today to vote Saturday on the proposal which would authorize the president to Modify, by proclamation, the war-time prohibition as it relates to beer and light wines.  He has not yet been arrested.  answer that wrould have been delivered had the Austrians been in possession of the complete treaty.  The Austrian reply will be made public only in connection with allies’ rejoinder. It is possible that  Frank P. Walsh and Edward F. Dunne, American representatives of the Irish Societies in the United States, have laid before President Wilson evidence alleged to have been received as to atrocities in Ireland. Some of the witnesses were American citizens, it is said, and In the course of the evidence they say they have “examined cells in which Irish revolutionists have been confined and have found fresh blood on the walls.”  Mr. Walsh and Mr. Dunne request President Wilson to immediately lay the additional facts submitted to him before the peace conference and urge a prompt hearing by an impartial tribunal.  dents. He announced that in the j    morning announced that the  limited time at his disposal lie must    French cruiser, Jeanne D ’Arc,    had  combine the subject matter ot torn    b een     disabled    at    sea    and that    the  addresses into this one. Mr. Rich- transport, Imperator, had taken off aids started off by asking where p r  pessoa, president-elect of Bra-i the country is regarding education     aQ( j kj g par ty who w T ere on  and proceeded to answer the ques- board. The president-elect and party tion. He did it in a most able and    were    enroute    to    the    United States  interesting manner. Among other !  from     Lisbon.  things he stated tnat there were 600,000 teachers in the United States; that of this number 20 per  The message gave no details as to the injuries or deaths, if any. Admiral Benson gave no details  PRESIDENT AND WIFE  VISIT KING AND WIFE  By th#* Associate#! Press  AD ENK I ER KE, Belgium. June 18.—President Wilson and wife arrived here from Paris at 8:45 this  THIS GERMAN PAPER  HOPES FOR RETTER DAYS  By tho Annodated Brens  BERLIN, June 17.—Commenting on the allied reply to the Ger-  Marriage Licence*.    .    .  Charles T. Batea. 34. Ada; Thee- ““"J™ 11 *JJg«3?G dona Griffin, 18, Ada.     ot  D eace the     Frankfort  Elliott Meaders, 23, Ada; Ethel | says:    .    ...  Wren 21 Ada    Whatever    we do will be terrible.  G W    Fuller, 35, Ada; Oney Germany is in no position to re-  Mathews 29, Centration!a.    J fu** to sign the treaty when the  Calvin Black, 18, Ada; Gertie signature is forced by a ultimatum.  Clark. 17, Ada.    i    Let us    resign    ourselves    to    the    In*  J. E. England, 47, Ada; Mrs. Lela j    evitable    and hope for a    better    fu-  Born, 39, Atlanta, Ga.    ture.”  II A VK GUIDI* IN IIKMGIM (he lader may not be sent until ™,“ rnl “ K ' , Thy wer<>  ” le '  b , > ’  Klnf : • Associated IT,*.    Austrians have had an nunor-    A"’'' 1 -'  an<1     E»'-abeth    and  By thf  PARIS, June 17.— Miss Margaret Wilson, daughter of the president; B. M. Baruch, and General W. W. Harts were members of the president’s party which left tonight for Belgium. They will be conducted through the devastated regions by two Belgian officers who have been detailed for the purpose,  Mr. Wilson will reach Brussels between 2 and 3 o'clock tomorrow afternoon.  the Austrians have had an oppor tunity to reply to the missing sections of the treaty, no date for the presentation of which has as yet been Ret.  left immediately for a motor trip over the Belgian front.  It will pay you to watch Want Ad columns of the News.  the  CAN’T PASS ON TREATY YET, SAYS GERMAN CABINET HEAD  By th#* AsaoointPd Pre**  WEIMAR* June 18. — Phillip Schiedemann, head of the German cabinet, speaking tqf the national assembly today, declared that the al-  cent had only an eighth grade  e ^' i other than the Jeanne d'Arc’s en ucation, and that one-third of the ,    became disabled yesterday at  total number were only 18 years ^ o’clock Greenwich time and three of age. He stated further that one hours later the Imperator came up of the things most needed in the  OT1  j took off the Brazilians. The schools today was a diagnostician position of the vessel at the time or an expert in psychology, and transfer was not given. The that his town of Ardmore had em- ^operator, which is bringing troops ployed such a man for next year, borne from France is expected to the man being Henry D, Rinsland,  rea>c b New’ York tomorrow morn-a graduate of East Central. He ; n g. So far as known here there further discussed the state text j were no passengers on the Jeanne book commission now in session ’’Arc other than Dr. Pessoa and in this state and said what this com- niembers of his partv. mission did this week more than] The fact that the Imperator did anything else would affect the ed- j  not  stand by the disable cruiser ucational interests of this state dur-  an( j that no mention was made of ing the next five years. Among oth- ; assistance being requested is taken er pertinent points In his speech, bere to indicate the French war-Prof. Richards said there had to:    >    is in no serious danger. It is  be a foundation for education in believed she w’ill make her own this country before we could ac-1  rep airs and that the transfer of the complish very much, as the system j passengers to the American trans-we use was established tor the j  por t was simply to avoid delay, classes and built from the top down.    _  It is hoped Mr. Richards will be heard at East Central again soon.  The text book commission mow in session in Oklahoma City is composed of Gov. J. B. A. Robertson, chairman; R. H. Wilson, state superintendent, secretary; C. Jack-  VMOOUNT NORTHCLIFF®  UNDERWENT OPERATION By the Annodated Prean  LONDON, June 18. - Viscount Northcliff©, wealthy newspaper owner, statesman and former head of, lied reply to the German counter-the British mission to the United proposals, without complete text, did States, underwent an operation to-] not yet permit of final judgment, day. The attending physicians say'and that premature judgment would  at  E* e  Normal tomorrow morning, that his condition is satisfactory. be a mistake.    ,    (Continued    on     ,:> age    Eight.)  The Jeanne d’Arc which left Lisbon June ll is one of the old style French w r ar ships. She is 470 feet long and has a beam of 81 feet. Her normal complement is 626 men.  The Imperator, to w’hich Dr. Pes-  son of Sapulpa; L. H. * Pettit of j  Boa  | s  reported to have been trans-  Collinsville; J. P. Battenberg of Atoka, and W. C. Kelsey of Hobart.  There will be another speaker  ferred w’as formerly one of the crack German liners and Is the second largest ship afloat. She was turned over to the United States by Germany under the terms of the armistice. She is at present being used I as a transport.   

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