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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: June 11, 1919 - Page 1

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Publication: Ada Evening News

Location: Ada, Oklahoma

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - June 11, 1919, Ada, Oklahoma                             Business Men of Ada Who Appreciate a Live Daily Will Please Show it by Giving Us a Little Lift-More Advertising Is Needed er Wm 8foa Cbenmg ADA, maAHOMA. WEDNESDAY, JUNE 11, 1919 A THIS DISTRICT TWO CENTS THE COPY PM m iWnd Will Arrive Later Than Expected TKAT 01-' TERMS WITH MANY AUK VRIXTKP IN KKC- BY 0. O. P. OKLAHOMA CITY IS IN THJK AWAlTlXtJ TO K UOYS A HKARTY WASHINGTON. June 11.- member of congress today CITY. June 11. tU.M-'V Hundred and Forty-second will not roach hero until 1 SO HKHK AVK AUK. Believing that Ada has reached the point where it de- serves n metropolitan daily newspaper, and having enough faith in the business men of tin- city to believe that they will maintain such a paper with increased advertising patronage, the News comes to Mayor of Muskogee Asks State Troops IXtJ 11RAFT SYSTKM THAT IrtJIM) GREAT MIL1- ITARY MACHINE. you today with another one bv" Oie" committee i and Jeff opened their show on .N J J. ntifuiith THifP f thfi NCWS 1" THE AMERICAN ARMY OF OCCUPATION, May 17, (Cor- _ i- A L-c-nrtio lod TO COPE WITH SITUATION GROWING OUT OF STRIKE. MU8KOGEE, Okla., June 11 Declaring that the city was unable Final Sparks from The A. P.' Bolsheviks on Rampage. Bv the Associated Press LONDON, June 11. Bolshevik OF OCCUPVnON, May 17, (Cor- Declaring that e cy of ot "The Associated cope wlth the strike situation forces cap ured PressO-Gorman military experts 9m_aII police department, the dues rece, y I 1 CSS. I 1 1 are! publishing in German periodi- document was obtained of ontortainment and pro- bv order of the Senate lau the senate uuv cram n epoch-making fight; Jt W.IS 1U1 i- a message from Pres- _apcrij nP1-e announced in the morning 0 CODV of the treaty brought night, making it necessa waer! the arade trom an- porformers iu lhc land in .heir various suggestions organization army the of a new German One plan is proposed by Major General von Francois who com- manded ft corps in the Argonne opposite the United States army last fall. His ideas have been re- published in numerous German newspapers and magazines. He proposes that men tms aiieruouii   and at the end of Wllll a 111 i.u-.ww --r Mayor John L. Wisener tonight tel- egraphed Acting Governor Trappe to order out the state militia, two companies of which are stationed m Muskogee. Ml cars were run into the barns o'clock tonight because of re- ports of an alleged plot to dynamite some of them tonight. Six motormen and conductors were badly beaten up by street car of Idaho, and other Repub- lican leaders who blocked every, move of the Democrats to prevent publication. Charges of broken faith effort? to have tin? matter considered in secret session and of order were swept aside: the document was ordered c Hundred machine gun battalion and the Hundred and Eleventh en.M are expected here Friday. ,ev are all units of the Thlrty- is dolling up in; shape for the occasion and is. give the boys ono_con- _ i n Vi mi (1 Congress Hasfens to Release Wire Control tne ciues itxeju.i.r i Kolchak's troops after three days fighting, according to a Russian wireless dispatch. Germany to Soon Reply. By tlic Associated Press PARIS, June 11. Official an- nouncement was made after tne meeting of the Council of Four yes- terday "-that there was great hope of a comparatively early decision m _ i_ Tt -ui'aR said plete. that opponents of the cition j'l.in capitulated. Decision to publish the was rmly one of lhe OAVSKS AC- norsKs YKSTKKDAY.. treaty Saivalion Army, V "have their in-! to flay in "lans. Ian to HSCsn 's: isri-iis, to rtoton, sou e arms each year, one-half on April 1 and tho other on Octo- ber 1. Every man capable of per- forming manual labor would be subject to military duty for one year beginning (it his twentieth year. The annually drafted would be used to. defend the coun- !try from attach 'and preserve or- der in the interior, no urges. All other? capable of working would I be drafted on April 1 or October 1, tut r.fier receiving a short course in military training, they would ho placed in labor battal- bo employed in socialized I'NION course in 01 tllBli I UI15, the Alia Vista lane several shots were fired at the motormen. Six men are in the hospital. One man, a returned soldier, was so badly beaten he was hardly recogniz- able, tho physician of the traction company said. Cru-s were run on all lines ex- cept two. They are not manned by strike breakers, but by local men, A mob of sympathizers formed n, all downtown corners and jerred and hooted passengers who got on or off the cars. They formed a line and paraded the streets all that reparations to the definite sum to be paid will be fixed in the treaty. House of Morgan Accused. tr.e Assocuufu WASHINGTON, June Root, former secretary of state, ap- pearing at his suggestion before the senate foreign relations committee, investigating how copies _ tne I'-ce treaty got into the ha ,o STRIKE WENT INTO EFFECT AT SEVEN O'CLOCK THIS MORN- IXG ON ORDER OF THE UNION'S PRESIDENT. By the Associated Press CHICAGO, June nation- wide strike union commercial telegraphers, called by S. J. Konen- kamp international president, of the Commercial Telegraphers Union of America, became effective at seven o'clock this morning. Companies against which the strike has been called include the Western Union, Postal and Ameri- can Telegraph and Telephone Com- panies, the ramifications of which permeats the entire North Ameri- can continent. Included in the- list also, are a number of smaller companies in various parts of the "the dispatch from Chicagp yesterday it was estimated that something like seven thousand tele- phone and telegraph operators would be involved in the city of Chicago alone. Over the entire con- tinent the union officials estimate that sixty thousand telegraphers will leave the keys some time dur- ing the day, and that on June 16th more than a hundrea thousand elec- trical workers will join the strike. On the eve of the walkout, state- ments were issued by representa- tives of both the Commercial Tele- graphers' Union of America, and the Association of Western Union Employes', the former asserting that the tie-up will be virtually 'complete and the latter that'only a few men will go out. persons in New York, for several weeks he had had------. given him by Henry P. Davidson, ol I ions to 1 branches of industry which have been taken over by the govern or je and paraded the streets ai eu lllm afternoon. j the Morgan Banking house. Mimiiser Issues Statement. Manager Long issued the fol- copy -ill naVO UK'll I 1111-111. Mot'ul- in ,IH. plans. WASHINGTON. June the I in irtual pans u eye or nationwide telegraphers i wlljcl, Nvoul tilnce will be 'roped off i strike, both bodies of congress today Sllpp0rr and Pi f, lihertv Kitchen where' acted lo end quickly government IO'U'...1! ,ho Rod Cross will comfol of the country's wire sys- Gcnernl Ken OMM LIJ me ,owin2 statement: These men would thus DC ..M'.lyol. promised me po- in productive activity lico' Votection if I would start the nnv fnr tllOlr OWn ml. rtnt rlv- tomorrow or Thursday. u More than 1.000 pies an Tlie senate I'r sa- lhe bill for repeal of pu, law UHthorizlnp federal jur.se lie- I ble pay for their own contribute to that of the armed forces. General von Francois advocates an army drawn up alone; the lines of the old model, saying; "In the training and develop- Complains, of Conditions ed I'rcss d I tion law authorizing federal Jurisdic-1 ]nen inno- More than tlu" ovor telegraph, telephone, bo avoided. and the -ooO cake" will De in the larder. am, ,incs, while the house mnilnry principles should be cake __ ,...n ,n One objec( should be establishment of tho, highest t Lit' Asyut. in Lt it lico protection If 1 woum PARIS, June Renner, c-irs todav The city has not glv- Austrian chancellor and head ot tne entire a'single man. Unless I get i Austrian peace mission, sent a letter protection tomorrow I will run the i to the peace conference complam.ng v ,___ in, thpm -Muirrt conditions" imposed upon proe in barn and let them stay SPKCIAL SESSION OF THE XKW YOlUv CALLKD TO ACT OX MEASCRB. for a settlement, but the Union claimed the basis I ent was unfair and twice voted 10 reject the contract. The Central Labor Union has urged that the carmen sign the contract, but n I tile t'StaDiiSnmcin ui tin, wire control June ..0 lUM. standard of discipline. The No move _ was made o a b> u i officers a? a class LZeWUson. commandant of "0 tU t- aiiii', i i i illty that communications would of tlie war department seriously hampered by the strike curtailed." .niAn-rnnh onerators. The threat- Th said the Germans motners win space to bo roped off at tho chon the ng of lclegrap opera. l distribute smokes and ,cned walkoui of electrical se cne WM said to have more serious pos cil of Four tomorrow. Service .Medals Awarded. v tln.> Assrtclntcil 1'ri'ss 'WASHINGTON, June 11. "I __ Michigan legislature late today rati- (ied the federal suffrage amend- Iment. Action was by unanimous vote in both houses. tineuished' service medals were i awarded Lieut. Eldon Breedon. Med- MADISON. Wis.. June in -j-_ _ _ __ _ ____ i ____ ___ _ i __ t if ion awarded Lieut. Eldon Breedon. Men-1 MADISON. Wis., June ine ford Okla Privates Carl Carter. Kvisconsin legislature ratified the i Claremore. and William Sody, Lo- federal suffrage amendment, the as- cust Grove, Okla., today. sembly voting 54 to 2, and the senate 23 to 1. TAKKS OP1W-EXTS OF TO TASK AND SA1S TKUMV Vl> INSVPPORT AUL lUM'uses (Jermiuiy's IIK' June reply German counter-proposals, agreed upon by the peace conference heads, J fnr man- Hi.- Assochitt-.l I'ri-sa _ 'WASHINGTON, June will mobilize ;n-poiic- .S! niSy   1111 n _ By the Associated Prem OKLAHOMA CITY, June 11. A small per cent of operators t ____ today, according as te mar thorities would handle the situa- tion. Asks Damages For "Good Licking" Charles F. Reece of Horatio. Arkansas, alleged to unanmousy p ifying the federal suffrage amend- ment Action was by viva voce to report for work today, according was by vlva voce to Western Union and Postal otti- cials Other men were put to work yote o( 45 to j the senate iu the places of those absent. Bus conc-urred in the house Joint resolu- ness is unhampered, say the com- ratifying the federal Suffrage iy uiivs luttj, ----r--- were injured while during corres- ponding period this year 400 em- ployes were Injured, a decrease of 590 or 56 per cent. During first Uob Gone. Plea addition to who WM later proprietor of a gar- ice on the same street, has lelt ?own and his friends are wondering as to his whereabouts. A reporter asked several men this morning if they knew any- thing about Mr. Gregory and the re port from each was that he sold his household goods last week and his family had gone. but they not where. They also report- Let a Want Ad get It for you. r Ada, MI ,mi Mlrtine Man in Ada. 590 or 56 per cent. During nm M Ra. sev fomer -citizen of twenty days May 1918. 9 employes M. 10. correspond- ing period this year 1 employes were killed, a decrease of 5 or 55 per cent. Total number casualties during first 20 days May last year, Hill i wt Ada, is in the city .shaking hands with his many friends. He s in the mining business at Miami, and says they are now having much success. For Bo.net ne.after 000 damages in federal court as fallure." balm tor a beating and whipping ______ O VPfl-V pany officials. Says Strike a, Failure. Bv tlu> AsiiOclntuU Press NEW YORK, June one hundred and sixty-six persons, in- cluding one hundred and twenty- one operators out of a total of forty thousand employed by the Western Union throughout the country, were absent from duty today at noon, Newcomb Carlton, company s pies dent announced in a statement terming the strike a "complete concurreu in me j-.--- tion ratifying the federal Suffrage amendment. Later the house took a roll call on the federal suffrage amendment, the vote being 132 to 3 tn favor of its ratification. The roll call was taken to obviate legal difficul- a year Access For Bometime arrer during lirst aays the sign ng of the armistice the 999. while this year the number, bottom dropped out of mine prod- is 404, a decrease of 595 or 60 per of ore has again, cent. tne siBuiut UL LIU. i bottom dropped out of mine prod- ucts but the price of ore has again, reached more than a ton and Mr Ramsey says It Is his candid belief It will go to soon Ramsey reports his family the best of health. NOTICE MASONS. Ailn Lodge No. 119, A. F. A. will meet promptly at 8 which he says he ago at the hands of certain pa trlotic citizens of Hugo, Oklahoma. Sterling Stamper, a deputy United States marshal, is named as one ot the defendants. Most of the accus- ed were members of the county council of defense. "False Imprisonment and mal- treatment" are among the causes of action against the citizens. Named as defendants are R. D. Bob Connell, Lou Wright, Dr. L. P Hampton, J. Steen, Warner Dlckson, Charles Slrumaker, John Palmer. F. C, Boswell, Sterling Stamper, R. E. Crossett, Henry hlVt" arid Sam Grant the "glad hand" Winston, Charles Strawn, when they arrive from their over- Nowell, Harve White and W. E. ___ Worth. T.aracv. Mrs. A. A. Bobbitt, Miss Polly Stanfleld, Claud Bobbitt and Dan Stanfleld left this morning for Ft. Worth in order to be at the sta- _. i___ j-1 ..11 TJ r.X_ tion tomorrow to give bitt and Sam Grant the "glad LIIUE'S fAIHEB IK H. C. seas trip. While .....Mrs. Laracy. It VV 111 J v M Want Ad columns of the News. the A message to the News this morning from W. D. Little stated that his father died at his home in Marshville. North Carolina, Mon- day. The funeral was held at the home-yesterday. Mr Little had been suffering for a long time and his death was not unexpected. The News joins the hundreds of friends of W. D. and Mrs. LittleJji to attend. offering of their ties. LABOR WOULD CONTINUE WITH PUBLIC OWNERSHIP ATLANTIC CITY, N. J.. June 11. proposal that organized labor insist upon public ownership of the railroads of the country was sub- mitted today to the delegates at- tending the re-construction cou- vention of the American Federa- tion of Labor by Glenn E. Plumb, counsel for the railroad brother- hoods. Representatives of the railroad workers received .unanimous con- sent from the convention for Mr. Plum to explain, the plan, the sa- lient principles of which have re- ceived their endorsement. Harry Boland, a special envoy of the "Irish arrived today to explain -the alms of the Sinn Feiners, At First Presbyterian church to- night at will be held a Com- munity prayer meeting. Don t ran I n the loss   

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