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Ada Evening News: Friday, May 9, 1919 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News (Newspaper) - May 9, 1919, Ada, Oklahoma                                 .... .    I  The present plight of Ada’s virgin thoroughfares is all the argument needed for street paving-Why prolong the agony?  TO* aba  ADA, OKLAHOMA, FRIDAY, MAY !), 1919  TWO CENTS THE COPY  KEA I TIKI I. FABRICS Kill  SUMMER DRESSES  of  of  Fin** Voiles, plain rotors aint novelty the finest Silks, Organdies, Tissues a; ti Unweave White Goods.  TMK V AIUI:  patterns, reproduction ,, comprehensive line  25c, 35c, 50c    85c  WHITE GOODS SPECIAL  plaids and stripes, 'im* for waists.  ii 7-1 ach Dimity, check tresses and children’s wear.  PHR V AKB:  19c  STEVENS-WILSON CO.  I’til NTFR CIG 11 hisNLS TO SOME l*l,A\K tout Till DOWN HA EN- Al-I, Sillies All SI Ith t»l\ EN I I* DM ASKS <11 I HK’I Al MVT    GINK    THOI'KLIC; OTHERS    I'MAKIS TERMS OF ICEAGE  EXI’KiTKII.    KEACH    ll    Al.IKAN.    TK    KATY.  Ile tin- \">'oi:tl« , ,I l'lt‘*»S  PARIS. May    It is generally  believed here that the Gertuafa will answer the delivery of the peace treaty by making proposals relative to certain phases of the document. A competent commission will examine the German answer and if edifications are necessary will notify the Germans to that* effect. It is expected in this rejoinder that the Germans will he allowed four or five days to agree definitely to the entire treaty, making it probable that from twenty-five to thirty days will elapse before the pact is finally signed and submitted to the various governments for rat imitation.  Mini Delegates Divided.  German delegate! tv) the peace congress are considerably divided among themselves in their views on tile peace terms submitted by the allied and associated powers, it was intimated today by high British authorities. according to a statement bv Reuter’s.  I Iv iii** A'Press  Two    pianos,    PARIS, May J*. The naval terms  completed the    of the peace jgpUy to be presented  of    their    attempted    mine-    to Austria, w% 7 rf they are complet-  tlight.    arriving here    Thurs-    ed, completely wipes out the Aus-  t|j iii.- A*>*h i.tt•*«! Kn*«s HALIFAX, May 9 the NG I and NC-3, tim lo Allan! iv  day evening at 8 o’clock. The dis- trian t a nee covered was r* 4 ti miles. The I large aviatoars expect to leave today on the second lap of the journey to Trepassev. New Foundlanil, a distance of 4 »i *♦ miles. From jb*‘ r e the voyage across the oCe&Qjfilvritl begin.    Si'  The third machine, the    de  veloped engine trouble after passing Chatham, Mass., and was forced to descend to the water. A motorboat finally located it and towed it safely into the harbor of Chatham at 5:3d this mornipg. The members    .    -    ~    ,    ,    ,  ot the crew reported that they were TKACHUK TRAINING GLASS comfortable aud passed tin night on    OK    t’KRISTIAN GHI HCH  a calm sea. Only one of the four!    --  engines of the plane was working.    The Teacher Training ('lass ut  Depart lire    Delayed#    the Broadway    Church    of ( blist    will  ) meet at 7:45    this evening and    will  {close im^nie    for all    to go to    the  G. 3 from    Halifax    for    Trepass.v, debate fftPlie    Normal  F„ on the second leg of the^  navy. All ships of that navy , and small are to be sui-1 rendered. Their disposition among the allies will be adjusted later.  Austria Gets Next Gall.  Both the council of four and council of foreign ministers re-! Burned their sessions this morning the former giving special attention to impej^^jg negotiations between j the alli^^Bti Austria and the lat- j ter dis€vRHI re ports on the boun- j duties of former Austro-Hungarian territories.  May 9. the N.  3 p. rn.- -C. I, and  FIVE TI AGAINST BONDS IS IN  ADA MEETS ALVA THIS EVENING  MAVOR INSISTS ON SEIB  OKLAHOMA CITY, May 9.—The opposition to the road bond issue continued to increase its store with the few scattering returns coming iu yesterday from several paws of the state.  A gain of 5,000 majority was made during the day, making the total majority for 1,8 50 precincts of the 2,500 in the state 50,059.  The total vote now stands: Yes, 50.225; no, 110.384,  WASHINGTON,  The departure of N.  N.  trans-Atlantic dight has been 'postponed until tomorrow, the navy department was advised just before noon today' in a radio message from the supply ship Baltimore at Halifax. Lieut. Commander A. C. Read advised the department that it will be two days before the N. C. 4 will be able to resume its journey halted because of engine trouble yesterday.  GERMANY PROTESTS PEACE-PACT TERMS  jim  iHH  CHINESE Will NOT SIGN TREATY  (tv th.* Assoria! cd Press  PARIS, May 9. The Chinese delegation has received cabled instructions from Peking not to sign the peace treaty because of the terms of the Kiao Chau-Shantung settlement. Instructions to the same effect have been received from representatives of both the northern and the Southern governments in conference .it Shanghai.  Everything is in readiness for the championship debate between Ada and Alva normals this evening at <:3e. This promises to be one of the best, perhaps the hest, affair of the kind ever pulled off here and tile outcome is being watched with intense interest. Mr. Molloy s •team is one of marked ability and the young people composing it have worked hard and gone deeply into the subject.  No admission fee will be charged and the public is cordially invited to be present  Men who served in the American and Austrian armies acted as technical assistants to Allen Holubar in the screening of “The Heart of Humanity.'' the thrilling eight-reel picture of love and war in which Dorothy Phillips is appearing this week at the American theatre. The blowing ap of trenches, the firing of huge starshells, the flashing of machine guns at night—are shown with a realism that only first-hand knowledge could provide.  i  Th* picturesque beauty of the Canadian Northwest forms the background for the opening scenes in "The Heart of Humanity," Allen Hoi ti bar’s screen romance of love and war in w'hich Dorothy Phillips is Appearing at th** American theatre today.  May rn Kitchens, w hen approached  t  by a News reporter yesterday, was knitting his brow and seemed to' be in deep trouble. He said be re--1 gretied that it had to be done, but, that he had a list of about forty citizens who had refused, or at least neglected, to connect with the sewer, i and that the time was af hand when j he would have to put the official FN RAG KR H iew< to the said negligent.*!.  BN Ult ASTIG TKR MS LAID DOWN IN DK AGK TRKATY.  WILSON IO VISIT  -X—*• 4 4 v  4 4  A  4 4  44444444  iii  INTRODUCING BABY TO DADDY  on tits return I rom the tranches, is norm* occasion. The R» Pillories should be recorded one of our Elegant Photo-Phom for an appoint  ive Mi,    Press  PAR IF, May 9.— Presid* in Wil-sou will visit Belgium soon. it is understood and will make an important speech while in that country.  Al THE PLAY HOUSES  LIBERTY.  Brand new program by the New Broadway Girls with their aggregation ol Hingers, dancers and comedians. The picture program presents Harry Morey in the dramatization of the famous novel. The Desired Woman.  By ti** A —,r, «l Pres*  BERLIN, May 9. “There is only on* immediate solution- peace with Russia and use of Bolshevik troops for Germany." Herr Geisherts. one o! i En* German delegates af Ver->ailles, is quoted by the Neue Zei-j tong .is declaring in ret ere® ce to I the peace terms. Other German delegates ■ are quoted by th** news-j paper a** follows; Her Landsberg;  I"Cruel announcements ot the press have been exceeded, we can do nothing but say yes or no. That is th* quintessence of a peace of fore**." Professor Soh necking:    "The    docu  ment is simply awful."  BERLIN. May IL The emir* German press violently condemns, the terms of the peace treaty as  t  given in preliminary summaries today. All papers from the extreme leit I radicals) to the ultra- conservative declare Germany cannot accept the terms.  The Berlin liberal organs in their preliminary comments raise these chief points:  1 The protest against the reduction of Germany’s army, calling th** number of soldiers provided* for by the treaty insufficient.  2 They say it is impossible for Germany to pay the initial indemnity sum of $5,000,000,000.  3- They declare Germany cannot accept the Saar valley and Danzig settlements.  BARIS, May 9. Anxiety is felt in American quarters here for the safety of the American commission now in Berlin.  Brief bulletins from the German capital describe public opinion there a*! enraged over the peace terms and it is feared there may be anti-Am-ei iran demonstrations.  MAY SALE NOW GOING ON Men’s and Boys’ Clothing Reduced  Best tailor  mg  Palm Beach Suits  For men and young men. Suits with style, known for their service to the wearer.  SALK PRIG ES  $13.88, $16.62, $11.40 Boys’ Suits  SAI.K PRICKS  $4.75, $6.17, $9.50, $14.25  DEPARTMENT STORE  PHONE 77  S.M. SHAW. PROP.  Established iii I OOH  AOA.OKLA.  REI*!MITER EFFORT BEING MADE rn STAMPEDE BRITISH FORGES.  ll, it,** AsM'fliil***! l*r»*ss  LONDON. May 9. A gigantic conspiracy to induce British soldiers to demobilize themselves by marching out of tile barracks at four stations in France and several more in England, and to persuade the sailors to seize the ports and invite lh* police gild soldiers in places to »oin them has been discovered, according f*) I he Daily Mail. I he premises ol a number of suspects have been searched ami compromising documents found.  Hon. E. E. (Din st end. secretary of tile National Building and Loan Association, of Pawhuska, will delivei an address iii Ada in behalf of the Ada Building and Loan Association some time this month, date to be announced later. O. R. Salmon, secretary of th** Durant Building  and Loan Association, will also speak here iii the near future. Watch the News for these dates.  Goose at Mrs;  Hill Dairy' milk for sale Land’s on Sunday. 5-8-31  Let a Want Ad get it for you.  INTEREST GROWS  v  .*.  graph*  meat  Stairs Studio  ♦  4  4  4  f  ¥  4  4  4  4  t  Last Sunday was probably th** hest day that the Sunray* Schools ~    '    til    Ada    ever    witnessed, so far as  AMERI! AN.    ,    attendance concerned. The day  Heart of Humanity drew a ,  wa8  the third Sunday of the contest house Thursday night and  444  PHOXK HA  444444444444  Th** packed  will do the same tonight, for it caught every body and those who saw it will recommend it to their friends just as th** News does.  Friday and Saturday special— one-pound box chocolates 59c — Mrs. Land's Lunch Room. 5-8-3t  Lei a Want Ad get it for you.  pm shaw it on  IMIS WE HAVE IN JET Bl,AGK  Im*  COLORATE IN ALL THE POPULAR COLORS  PUTNAM’S FADELESS DYES-------------------  DIAMOND DYES ---------------------------  RIT. ALADDIN. ELKY’S DYER-- -I.-.    ----  Mn  .Ilk*  to*  ORDER RY MAIL  Gwin Gr Mays Drug Co.  for Sunday School attendance and on this day the race was between those under 15 years of age and {thole above 15. The contest was won by those under 16, but the exact figures are not available. The coming Sunday marks the close of ; the contest and all citizens of Ada jar** urged to attend al one of the j churches.  The attendance at each of the churches of Ada as given out by i the Sunday School secretaries is I given below. The total attendance was 1,322, which is nearly three hundred above any previous record  First Baptist. 377.  First Methodist, 304.  I First Christian, 157.  NorthHide Baptist, 130.  Nazarene, 116.  Church of Christ, 125.  Presbyterian, S3.  Episcopal, 30.  L. T. Walters returned from Oklahoma City this morning where he went to attend thet Oklahoma Undertakers’ Directors’ Association j which was held at that pine** this week. Mr. Walters reminded the reporter, however, that he was not engaged in the undertaking busi-1 ness just at this time, but he merely wanted to keep abreast of the ] times.  44 + 44444  IT MAKES NO DI I  Ii makes no difference what you lose if you are abl** to find it. It makes no differ* ereiice what you want if you are abl** to get it. It makes no difference what your have to sell if you are able to sell it. Now does ii?  News ‘ want" or ‘ classified’’ ads are the shrewdest detectives in the world. They find lost articles; they get you a cook, a man to work garden, or anything else want that ean be had in city of Ada; and they will your wares if you will « them.  On** cent per word per Is all they cost. Use ’phone.  ♦♦♦♦♦♦  A. H, S. JUNIOR  the  you  the  sell  use  day  the  FRED E. SWITZER WILL BE  WARDEN OF PENITENTIARY  OKLAHOMA CITY, Okla.. May 9.  The resignation of Sam Morley, warden of the State Penitentiary at McAlester, has been placed in the hands of Governor Robertson, and will take effect at the pleasure of the governor. Fred E. Switzer of Mangum will be th** new warden, but the change will not take place for a month or more. Mr. Morley here today said that he would be a resident of McAlester, having business interests there. ll** was one of the first appointees of Governor Williams and has made a good official.  A group of the moat talented child actresses iii fllindopi appears in “The Heart of Humanity,** Allen ITolubai ’s eight-reel pin urination af ah absorbing story of love and war in which Dorothy Phillips is appearing at American theatre today.  The Junior class *>i th** Ada Mig! School will honor the Senior class at a banquet in the dining hall of the Harris Hotel tonight at 9  o'clock.  Those who will he present are Misses Nora Abney. Mae Burdick, Ola Burk, Alberta Chaffin. Edith Chapman, Effie Forrest, 'Gladys Gil-sfrap. Bernice Hargis, Opal Little. Mary Marshall, Lulu McDaniel, Helen Moser. Alice McLachlan. Ada Pennington, Anna Belle Perry, Let-tie Rock and Messrs. Julian Allen, Erie Fentem. Welborne Hope, Mead-eis Jones, Travis Kerr, Arnold Mallory, Roy McKeown, and Lennox R odd ie of the Junior Class; Misses Agues Cameron. Aria Ruth Clark. Willie Cole. Ruth Collins. Elsie Felton, Vivian Hastings, Dorothy Heady. Jewel Jordon, Coli n ii e Moore, Dorothy Waggoner, Mary Waggoner, „ and Messrs. A u b re y K e r r. T h o rn a s Marshall, Lawrence Mooney, (Guy Orr, Hardy Roach. Carver S w a f f a r, Vein Walters, and Judson West of the Senior class; Mrs. Josephine Bullock and Mrs. Frances B. Cutler, sponsors, respectively, of the Senior and Junior classes; Superintendent J. E. Hickman. Mr. Charles Rayburn, and Toastmaster, Thomas P, Holt.  Seigean Joe W. Webster, who has recently been discharged from the army, and who has been visiting his brother Dr. M. M. Webster and family, left Thursday for Akron .Ohio, when* he goes to accept a position as salesman for the Firestone Automobile Company.  Dainty Neckwear  for Summer  Have arrived in abundance here, just in time to make our collar section an interesting spot for Saturday. Many a worn frock may modify its appearance with a touch of freshness, many a discarded one may take a new' lease on life with several changes of neckwear at a trifling expenditure—especially if one chooses from these new arrivals.  ORGANDIE AND CREPE IN WHITE AND COLORS, PLAITED AND PLAIN, ROLL OR FLAT STYLES-  50c is $1.50  The Surprise Store  Established 1903  JI5-117 West Main St.  ... Phone 117   

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