Ada Evening News, April 5, 1919

Ada Evening News

April 05, 1919

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Issue date: Saturday, April 5, 1919

Pages available: 4

Previous edition: Friday, April 4, 1919

Next edition: Monday, April 7, 1919 - Used by the World's Finest Libraries and Institutions

About Ada Evening News

Publication name: Ada Evening News

Location: Ada, Oklahoma

Pages available: 241,891

Years available: 1904 - 1978

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Ada Evening News (Newspaper) - April 5, 1919, Ada, Oklahoma Wbt $foa €bemng VOLUME XVI. NUMBER 20 ADA, OKLAHOMA, SATURDAY, APRIL 5, 1919. TWO CENTS THE COPY Ik e mi ditary back YOU see it with the it goes here new waist-s e a rn suits; snug, body-tracing, emphasizing the shoulders and making waist look narrower. the You'll find it here in all the very best styles; made bv— a Hart Schaffner Marx your mr other You’ll get more for monev here than any • % place; more style, more wear. more all-around satisfaction. If you don't, you a    a your money Wack. pet PRICES TO $25 T0 $50 AIM'HA NG KL SKH TOK N KAUI NU i ll ISIS; All> SK.NT TH Ii KAT-K\Kl) TKOO|*s. NAVAL BATRE Kh'hmTO) IHI HACK ORDERED FLEET TO ATTACK A IJJ Kl) NAVY. ONLY SHALL FRACTION OF GERMAN ARM IHS STILL I N HKII ARMS. By tin* Associated PrcM LONDON. April 5. itll port ant development* on tho Murmansk front in Northern Russia may bo exported in a few days, owing to the threatens! defection of Finnish troops, according to the Mail. It is said it was to meet this danger thai American detachments were sent on two American cruisers which will arrive at Murmansk early next week. President Wilson is reported to have ordered the sailors to land I with the troops if necessary. Americans Will Withdrinv. WASHINGTON. April 5. Declaring the Archangel situation is militarily well in hand. General March today announced that the war department's plan was to have the American forces out of that part of Russia bv tile end Of June. By the Associated Press WASHINGTON, April 5. ton the latest status of igi; lit By the Associated Pre1'* LONDON, April 5. Leon Trotsky, bolshevik! minister of war and ma- J on the latest status of military fine. has ordered the Russian Baltic forces in Europe, General March an-; fleet to put to sea and attack the not! need today, show that the armies I allied fleets, threatening to have all; of the Central powers as now ortho crews shot if they disobey the ganized constitute about 15 percent order, says the Mail. pvright PHVHa't ^iuffner J. Marx SHIRTS. HATS, FINE SHOES. NECKWEAR— All the things you’ll want for Easter—now ready STEVENS-WILSON CO. DEPORTED TREATY ALMOST COMPLETED PARIS. April 5. The opinion was expressed last night by a responsible British authority that the peace treaty will be ready for signatures by' Wednesday next. LONDON, April 5. The Paris correspondent ot the Daily Telegraph wires that he is ;ible to state on the highest authority that by Sunday a complete agreement will have been readied by the council of four. til HOLDINGS XI SYRIAN KOVAL FAMILY KA-I LU) AND PROPERTY IS t x>NFist ATK!). By the A^swu lated Press COPENHAGEN, April 5. The German-Aurtrian national assembly has passed a bill,' introduced March 2 7. banishing the members of the Hapsburg family and confiscatfng their property, according to Vienna advices. Other bills doing away with certain titles of nobility aud abolishing capital punishment, ex- Of their strength when Hie armistice was signed, while the allied forces still organized comprise 75 percent of this total strength on November ll. Official dispatches show the aggregate allied strength now is 1.125.000 men. The demobilization of the American army, including incomplete reports to April 5 show a total of 1.024,171 discharged, of whom over 91.000 were officers. Total troops ordered for deniobiliaztion are 1,-836,500. The strength of the American army April 5 was estimated at 2,055,71 8. representing the demobilization of 4 4 percent of the enlisted and 4K percent of the commissioned personnel. Y our B oys Suits cept lieder passed. martial law. also were T LADIES I KC.ED TO ll EG IST EK EAKLY AT KED FUOSS ll EA IKJ!’ARTERS. TEACHERS SHOW UP WEIL IN FIRST CAME Protease; Newcomb’s young baseball aspirants showed up iii pretty good form in their first attempt Friday afternoon when they walked over the Francis High School learn, 18 to S. Although the teachers are young, they display a good knowledge of baseball and handle the pill with comparative ease. Ingram is developing into a mr under of no mean proportions. The Francis boys play good baseball, but they were not in the running with the teachers. The next game will be played next week against the Shawnee high school. SIK WNI. « 'KOOKKS, EA MOI S S41 KAT I ST, IS DEAD By the A•>»<>« lated I*re»s LONDON. April 5. Sir William Crookes, the famous chemist who discovered thallium, a new element in 1861 and who constructed the radiometer. de\ eloping the theory of radiation, died here yesterday. CH was borti June 17. 1832. MPROVEMENT IR President ft o’clock WU* this By if- A?" < iat*d Pres* LARIS, April 5. ><*n slept until after morning and no bulletin was issued by Rear-Admiral Grayson, ti is physician. Although he did not get to sleep until late last evening. It was announced ihis morning lie had passed a satisfactory flight. Grayson Saj* Wil so?i Keller, WASHINGTON, April 5 President Wilson was reported ‘better this morning, but confined to his Tied; no cause for worry.** }n a message received at the White House from Rear Admiral Grayson, according to Secretary Tumulty today. GERMANS WOULD MAXE SOUGHT Kilt INDEMNITY BERNE. April 5. Mathias Erz-berger, chairman of the German ar-! tnt sties commission and a member of the German government, was accused of being the author of a document written in 1914, showing that Germany’s peace terms, if she won, would include large annexations and indemnities. Herr Landauer. a rep-tesentative of the Munich soldiers and workmen’s council, declared in I a speech ai Augsburg. Bavaria, according to a dispatch to the Frankfort Zeitung. Landauer, who was speaking at a meeting in memory of Kurt Eisner, the late Bavarian pre-| mler, said he bad a copy of the document. Landauei at first refused to gi'e the name of the author, except that Tie w as still a member of the go\ - OEF I Bv h*- A sum lated Dress* BERNE. March 7. i My Mail) Wartime :ood restrictions still weigh Lea' iIv upon the Swiss aud are expected to for several months. The bread ration has been in-] be cr* ased to nim ounces a day and is * \p.-ct* d to remain at this allowance ti'l after ibis year's harvests. The cheese ration is wine ounces a mouth, Putt* i is only obtainable in the remoter country districts. The sugar ration . eighteen ounce a month. There is a great dearth of milk md. although th*' ration is nominally a pint pet day. it is rarely possible u» obtain more than half of a pint. Hap!con, sago, macaroni, anti eminent. Finally, however, he said.    i i .si *• *•    > ‘    ,    j    I    many    other    similar    articles    ot    food Boded F HOME TEET THEIR WARDS that the person to whom he a was Heil Erzberger. Among tile peace terms mentioned in the document, Landauer said. were: Annexation of Belgium, French Normandy and several towns on the southeastern coast of England. Annexation of the territories on the eastern frontier of Germany which have since become separate states. Establishment of a large German colonial empire. Payment of a ciliated to cover during the first war as well as debt before tilt Herr Landauer asserted these terms were approved in war indemnity cal-Germany’s expenses ten months of the th** entire German war. that prin ce me before equipping your car. Try Racine tires.—Ford Service Station 229-231 East Main 3-12-lmo Hear Wbipkey next Sunday morning and evening at the First Methodist church.    4-3-3t Making Faces That's what we do for a living. We can make prettier the prettiest and make pretty the bomi test.. Phone an appointment. Studio 34 Captain and Mrs. Kelly, who conducted the orphans’ home at the cor-i tier of Rennie and Tenth street, so i it is reported, have left Ada without giving their permanent address, j * According to information given the News by one of the three officials. Judge Orel Busby, Mayor Gary Kitchens and Rev. S. B. Damron investigated the matter thoroughly and decided that all was not entirely straight with the management. Although the Kellys had left, having sold their interest to other prrties, the three decided that the home ought to he closed and the children turned over to the United Charities. Among the reports in reference to the management of th** home, it is said that in soliciting money in Shamrock and probably other towns in the state it was represented that the home contained many more children than are actually in the home. ciple by General von General Moltke aud Tirpitz. XX Palkenhaysen. Admiral von ire entirely lacking. Meat, though unrationed, is verj poor in quality (annot b* obtained for less than $1.50 a pound. The resti lotion which most seriously affects file economic lift' of the the country and also the comfort of the inhabitants is the reduced service of trains due to the coal famine. All express trains have been suspend and the speed of the few' slow train* that run average*; about fifteen miles an hour. Connections I were down between trains on different lines are helped Hurst niade as difficult as possible to dis- J courage travelling. Fares have been 1 virtually doubled. The trains are packed, many long-distance travellers are obliged to stand in the corridors all the wr.; an the jolting is violent I All ladies who desire to register I for the course in home nursing given by the Red Cross chapter of, Pontotoc county, are requested to bt at Red Cross headquarters early Monday morning as the registration will be disposed of as quickly! as possible and class work begun. | The course will consist of fifteen lessons and the working hours will! from 9 to ll a. in., 2 to 4 and] 7 to 9 p. rn. on Monday, Tuesday and Thursday. No class fee is charged. This course, as Miss Anderson, the nurse in charge of the work, does not pretend to In* such a course as a trained nurse would receive .but is for the purpose of giving instructions on the home care of the sick which is so badly needed ar times. Home hygiene, food preparation. care of the beds, as well as how' to take measures to prevent illness in the family. Miss Anderson is pre-eminently qualified for this work. She graduated eighteen years ago and has been nursing most of the time since besides taking special work. For more than a year she was in war service, part of the time at Columbia war hospital. IT. S. General No. I, in New York anti part of th** time in England. The ship on J which she sailed carried 6.000 troops and when it landed many ith influenza, these cases and then assigned to a hospital neat erpol where soldiers brought France were placed. This course is the beginning work in public nursing that Cont*,toe County Chapter of the This is a thing of interest to you. At the present time you will find it an easy thing to make your selection here, where you wiK find coats with hand-shaped fronts which give more life to the garment .With pockets that don’t sag, with all the inside pant seams taped and overcast to prevent raveling or ripping, with buttons sewn on to stay and with the best fabric—and many other good features. $5 to $17.50 Men s T rousers Special This Week ' $6 This is the time to buy odd trousers and this is your chance to get some real merchandise at a big spacial. You will find these trousers are iii the best of styles; also tailoring and materials that you will apre-ciate. Good buyers this line. will not fail to see Values Up to $7.50. MEN,SEE OUR SHOES, SHIRTS, HATS, CAPS, NECKWEAR J&fUuvk. DEPARTMENT STORE PHONE ll S.M. SHAW, PROP. Established in IMS ADA, OKLA. IS TO BE PAVED SOON ON DANZIG REFUSAL 'Uh* property holders on South Broadway have signed a petition for paving the street. Considerably more than half of the property is represented and it is reported that possibly not a single property holder will object. The street is to bt* forty leet wide and the paving is to extend to Eighteenth street. By the Associated Press PARIS, April 5.- (Havas) — Marshal Foch has telegraphed the allied governments that the right of the allies to use Danzig as a port for the return to Poland of Polish troops in France, has been formally upheld in the conference with Ger ing. as are those on East Tenth and Hast Ninth. Also the property holders on East Twelfth street are getting in the paving mood and contemplate t Ila I street iii the citv class. man representatives. Other streets are under considers-I Arrangements Satisfactory. Hon. tfome of the property holders PARIS, April 5.—It was officially on South Townsend are talking par- announced this morning that arrangements for the landing of Polish troops at Danzig and their transport along other lines proposed by Germany had been arranged to the entire satisfaction of the allied powers. ll. JONES CORRECTS STATEMENT KY OKLAHOMAN The Oklahoman states that W. IL Jones was at Oklahoma City Friday in the interest of moving the girls’ industrial school for Oklahoma City to Roff. Mr. Jones requests the News to make the following correction of the Oklahoman story: ’ I never had in mind and knew nothing about the proposition of Roff wanting the Industrial school for girls. I told Gov. Robertson and others that Roff would like to have one of the tubereulor sanitoriums, and nothing regarding the industrial school for girls was ever mentioned to mc or by me.” owing to attachment to passenger tining of freight cars which are shunt cd at the stations en route. The importation of coal into Switzerland falls short of the necessary minimum of 170,000 tons a month and this deficiency must be made good before travelling can become normal again. The locomotives of the Swiss State Railways are burning wood instead of coal. The war r*vst riot ion on the use of gasoline is aboil* to be removed, its shortage macs- 1917 had been so great that the entire supply had to be reserved for the use of the army and for physicians in emergency cases. , The automobile had almost disappeared from Swiss roads. Now' a large purchase of gasoline from Bohemia will permit unlimited sale. Let a Want Ad get it for you. FUPTONA I I—ll I V/i Iii A COMBINATION OF PEPTONIZED IRON, MALT, MANGANESE AND COD LIVER EXTRACT A Reconstructive Tonic and Aid for Enriching the Blood, Building the Strength and Improving the Health Generally. A FINE AFTER “FLU” TONIC Per Pint, $1.25 Gtfin <S~ Mays Drug Go. Intentions Count for Little. To he always intending to live a new life, Gut never to find time to set chout it, is as if a man .should put off eating and drinking and sleeping from one day and night to another, till lie Is starved and destroyed.—Tillson. Oklahoma Rrexjties. WETUMKA The bringing in oft a 35,000,000 gas well has stimulat-l ed interest in the field and five1 more wells will be drilled at once. J The town is to be supplied with bt an early date. She was Liv-j from I of a t lit* Red Cross expects to carry on in peace times. Another epidemic of influenza may sweep the country this fall and it is of prime importance that I the people be prepared to meet it. A few months hence, as soon as possible, a permanent nurse will be em-plowed who will travel over the county giving courses where the people are interested and doing everything possible to diminish human suffering and reduce the death loss. In her stay here Miss Anderson expects to visit other places and explain the nature of the work. The Red Cross did wonderful work during the war and in caring for the influenza patients at the emergency hospital when many were in need of help and this work in peace time is expected to be of prime importance in spreading knowledge of methods of home nursing that all may j employ In cases of illness of members of their families. Fleet Cooper’s automobile laundry now open. Cars laundred $1.00. Fleet Cooper garage set vice first. 3-31-6t Our line of Men’s complete. Burk’s. Clothing is 4-4-2t gas No Friends Like Old Friends. Esteem of great powers, or available qualities newly discovered, may embroider a day or week, but a friendship of twenty years Is Interwoven with the texture of life. A friend may be found and Inst, hut an old friend can never be found, and nature ha* provided that he cannot easily be lost. —Samuel Johnson. WETUMKA One produce house paid out $300 for eggs and poultry in one day recently. LUCY GATES CHARMS FARGE AUDIENCE HOLDENVILLE—Hughes county will on May 6 vote on the question of issuing $75,000 bonds for helping to build a bridge across the Canadian at Calvin and $125,000 for a courthouse. Delphian dub. The Delphian Club will meet at 3:00 o’clock in the First Methodist Church parlor Tuesday afternoon. All who are members of this club and expect to study the course as outlined are urged to be present at this meeting as it is important that all get the very first lesson in the course. —* Mrs. Wells, President. Lee McKinney arrived this morning with his discharge from Camp Pike, seemingly none the worse off for having served six months in overseas duty since he has not lost his happy smile an/ the twinkle in his eye. HOLDENVILLE — Work gun on paving 22 blocks paving and a move is on pave twelve more blocks. has boof new foot to OKMULGEE—O. II. Gray, a foamer living nine miles southwest of Okmulgee, comttiitted suicide by handing himself. RAVIA — Barney Underwood, an Indian, was shot by Constable McCollum while resisting arrest and is expected to die. L TISHOMINGO—By a vote of 168 to 28 Tishomingo decided in favor of issuing bonds for a municipal erect; ic light anil ice plant. Young. Men’s waist-line models and silk-lined suits — catchy and smart. —Burk’s.    4-4-2t. Those who seized the opportunity] of hearing Lucy Gates sing last evening were in no way disappointed. Her pleasing personality and simple manner won for her n responsive] audience. She has a remarkable range of voice, her highest tones! were reached with surprising easel and spontaneity, while her lowest tones were characterized with clearness and accuracy. The music lovers of the audience were more than delighted with her rendition of the Bell Song from ’’Lakme” in which such wonderful technic was manifested. Her voice is beautiful in quality and has a lyric power that is most appealing sympathetic. Those who heard the concert have every reason to congratulate themselves and feel satisfied that they have heard this unusual artist of coloratura. That the singer is thoroughly American was evinced by her keen sense of humor displayed when “Old Tige” chimed in on the chorus. Let a Want Ad get it for you. N e w Easter Apparel for GIRLS A truly wonderful selection of dainty Voile and Organdie Dresses in lace, ribbon and embroidery trimmed, which in scope of variety is the largest we have ever had, and from the viewpoint of beauty, simply unexcelled. Sizes 2 to 16. PRICED FROM $1.50 T0 $12.50 The Surprise Store Established 1903 J15-117 West Main St. Phone It7 ;