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Ada Evening News: Friday, March 7, 1919 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News (Newspaper) - March 7, 1919, Ada, Oklahoma                                 ®he a €bemng_Sebs  VOLUME XV.  VI TM RER ITO I.  ADA, OKLAHOMA, FRIDAY, MARCH 7, 1919.  TWO CENTS THE COPY  Welcome Teachers  To The  PEERLESS CITY  of  East Central Oklahoma  You have met here to discuss the newest and best methods in teaching. We wish you unqualified success. The doors and all facilities of this modern store are wide open to you.  STEVENS-WILSON CO.  [onus chier min  COOK IIL IO REICH JURI  AtVUSKD r A TH KU OK \Ol\(i til UL TO KNOW KATS IN SHOUT TI MF.  By the AI’rvs*  CHICAGO. March 7. The case of J. Norman Cook, od trial for the alleged murder of Win. E. Bradway, middle aged admirer of seventeen year old daughter. Norman Cook, in expected to reach the jury late today. At the opening of the trial today Cook* attorney began plea for him. The girl made a tatement today, telling that she waa not in any of half dozen place she was reposed to have visited after the killing of Bradway. but remained throughout the search for her on the north side in Chicago. She vs eat out occasionally garbed as a boy.  I OUM FU AMERICAN WINS BY LAULE MAJORITY OVER l*A-IIOH TARTY CANDIDATE.  ll THE PLAY  LIBERTY.  The Princess Maids will again appear at the Liberty theatre this evening. The picture program will consist of a great story. Dawn of Understanding, featuring Bessie Love. Other pictures will also be shown.  AMERI CAV.  This picture house will present this evening Shirley Mason and Earnest Truev in Come On In, a story of thrilling interest and intensely human. This is an unusually good offering.  By tie' Associated Pre*#  LONDON, March 7 The Duchess of Marlborough, formerly Consuelo Vanderbilt of New York, was elected to the county council today from the north division of Sou til wark by a large majority over her opponent, a labor candidate. She stood for election as a progressive.  A M KS ti ILAN COMMISSION IIF-TORTS FOOD SITUATION Is DESTER ATK.  We Can Make It  If you have a Photo that you want Copied or Enlarged, brine it to us We have every facility for doing this class of work and. we know bow —  Stairs Studio  PHONE 34  Bf tho Associated Tress  HOME. March 7. The commission sent by the American peace delegation to inquire into conditions in Montenegro passed through Rome today on their way to Tarts. It is reported the situation is desperate iii Montenegro aud said the population is actually dying of starvation. As an instance af the suffering it was said of a family of eight children five have died from lack of food and three reduced to skeletons were found scratching in the earth for roots or nettles for food.  j For hoarseness, inflamed lungs or irritating coughs, BALLAH D’S HOREHOUND SYRUP is a healing balm. It does its work quickly and thoroughly. Price 2. r ic, 60c and $1.00 |per bottle. Sold by Bart Smith.  MILD WINTER IN  HITSON HAN HERION  By ;br Associated Presa  THE PASS. Manitoba. March 7. After a f*00 mile journey with his dog team. Horace Halcrow ' mushed” into The Pass with the startling information that Hudson’s bay was Open when he left its west shote in February.  Halcrow said the water has been open at Port Nelson harbor since last May and that he heard even the strait VSH* free of ice. Such conditions are considered remarkable, if not historic.  Halcrow region has enza. sum*  Pas and Hudson’s wiped out.  Because of the mild winter napping has not been very profitable since Christmas. He declared, adding that fishing bas been the big tn-! dustry on Hudson’s bay all winter.  ‘Catching halibut off !*ort Nelson and York Factory bas been going on all winter. They just throw halibut  !  into the boats and when they are filled. they pull ashore.’’  Since Halcrow left Hudson’s bay, weather conditions have changed The Pas has experienced thirty be-I low weather which means that the temperature may have dropped to flf-■ tv below in the Port Nelson district.  O V E ll BOO PROGRESSIVE TEACHERS OF KAST CENTRAL DISTRICT HERE.  The opening session of the East Central Education Association was held Thursday evening with more than 300 teachers registered and a number of citizens of Ada present. In the absence of President V. H. Durham, who is suffering from an attack of influenza. Superintendent John T. Hefley of Henryetta presided-The program opened with a splendid piano rendition by Miss Lulu Le** of the Normal faculty, followed by a most excellent reading by Miss Bess Barrow, teacher # of expression at the Normal. The Cruz orchestra gave a delightful number. Representing Mayor Kitchens, Judge C. E. B. Cutler extended a warm welcome to the visitors. President Cordon welcomed them on behalf of the Normal. Principal F. L. Stewart of Okmulgee responded to the addresses of welcome. Dr. A. E. Winship. editor of the Journal of Education, Boston, delivered the feature address of the evening.  Dr. Winship emphasized the fact th At a new order of things has come, that the world inov»*d a century in one year and inns! now.* adjust itself to the change and prepare itself to meet the new conditions. The war taught the world the value of copera-tlon and this must be the policy of the world in the future. This lesson was learned only after the allies had suffered severely by reason of having no unified command aud finally put Marshal Foch in supreme command.  Democracy was born when the armistice was signed on November ll, lOls. and the death knell of autocracy and aritoeraey was sounded. A rope can be made of almost anything that contains fib* r, but fiber is absolutely essential. In the same way world democracy must be held together. No individual nor nation can play a lone game any longer. The community. must be the unit of the new democracy.  He illustrated the working of organized democracy by an eighty-seven-piece orchestra he heard a short time ago. Every instrument kept its place with the result that here was a splendid performance, but one out of place could have destroyed the entire effect.  Hereafter the boys and girls must be educated with the community instead of the individual idea. The school must be responsible for it* community. Never in history has the teacher been called on to play so important a part as it is now. He criticized the old idea of aristocracy in scholarship and declared the time has coni** whtn the world demands that aristocracy be ar.%en from the schools ani toe educational system and maul of iii* old I ard an*! fast ideas displace 4 .  GERMANS FLASH WITH BOUCHE-VIKI ON BALTIC AND AI).  MINI STER DEFEAT.  Welcome Teachers and Visitors  Make  Our  Store  Ry tho Associated Tress  LONDON, March 7~ A German I wireless message received here states i that in addition to volunteer marine, division and portion of republican mi- | litia, parts of the second guard regi- J meat aud the guard fusileer regiment went over to the Spartacans Wednes-1 day. Dispatches to the Mail sent Wed-j need ay night asserted that as a re-1 suit of the compromise the strike would end today.  Bolshevik! Ixise.  LONDON, March    7.—Oeiman  troops on the Baltic coast have severely defeated the Bosheviki and have captured Riga, according to a report received by telegraph this ' morning.  Your  Head  quarters  CLOTHES OF STYLE AND QUALITY FOR EVERY MAN  Snappy styles—“peppy” models—splendid materials— for this season's wear. Snits made to hold their shape - made by master tailors and everything that it takes to make good clothes, are in them. See this wonderful showing.  Sell loss Bros., Mayer Bros., and Other Coml Lines.  flaws,  MSRVRJIIJIlJKCKCTS  DEPARTMENT STORE  PHONE 77  S.M. SHAW, PROP.  Established in IWM ADA, OKLA.  COUNTY AND OKLAHOMA PORTLAND CEMENT COMPANY TO DI V IDE EX PKN SE.  said that while the bay not suffered from in flu -settlements between The bay were almost  The County Commissioners have agreed to co-operate with the Oklahoma Portland Cement Company and build a mile of concrete road west from the city limits of Ada. This span will extend by the cement plant and will be used by those going to Lawrence and other places south or those going on due west. It is to be built for demonstration purposes and will cost the county little money.  The Cement plant will furnish the engineers without any charge and will also pay half of the actual expenses of construction. In this way the citizens of the county can see what a concrete road is and determine w'heth cr they desire to construct others. The county also will be putting little money into the proposition, and it is considered an admirable arrangement in every respect.  Milton Garner, County Clerk, says that good road sentiment is increasing in the county all the time. He believes it will not be long until the county wil construct some kind of hard surfaced roads, and th** only problem is to determine the kind.  can Army records, and excepting the cooks, waitresses, etcetera, all we odd 400 girls are really the ‘Waacs’ of the American Expeditionary Force.  “We love the work, we love the camp and the boys look after us well. They are splendid fellow's. We have comfortable rooms, a recreation room and hockey and are as happy as possible. Anti now we are getting up a grand revue called the “■Battle of I Bour gas.’ I ani to be a French girl.  I The chorus is one of the best and the music truly American. I’m afraid  your music over there when wre come back won’t have enough “pep” in it. j Honestly, the boys can play. Even in the camp can play the violin and j those who are doing scavenger work ; piano.”  We specialize on clever dress tor j men and women, including shoes. I Burk’s Style Shop.    3-6-3t.  Benton’s Blight Remedy for sale at Gwin & Mays Drug Store. Guaranteed.  I 2-27-2mo*  Stationery  Crane s Linen Lawn.  Symphony Lawn. «  Pound Paper, 50c, 75c.  Linen and Bond Tablets, 10c, 15c, 20c, 25c. Envelopes, Linen and Bond, 10c, 15c, 20c.  One Mark of Refinement is the Proper Use of  Elegant Stationery.  Gwin &-Mays Drug Co.  Kexall Agents — Liggett*.* Chocolates  OKLAHOMA DEL KC i A TI ON  FAVORS LEAGUE TI*AN  WASHINGTON. March 7. After polling the Oklahoma delegation on the league of nations question the following expressed themselves as emphatically favoring the same:  Senator Owen. Scott Ferris. W. W. Hastings. J. B. Thompson, Jim Mc-Clintie .Charles Carter and Tom Mr-Keown.  Dick Morgan iR in favor of a league. but does not commit himself to the proposed league. Senator Gore is reported in Washington papers ae oppose I to th** league.  BELGIAN FOUCH KIND IM HT-MENTH CONTAINING ORDERS TO 111 N TROOI’N,  LONDON, March 7 A Reuter dispatch from Paiis says additional evl-dence will be laid before the peace conference commission on reparation by presentation of a full Aet of documents discovert by Belgian police containing detailed instructions to German troops for carrying out of their work of destruction in Begium.  HENATE STANDS PAT  ON GOOD ROAD BILL  The Senate yesterday refused to concur in amendments made to the senate road LIU by the House. A conference w’as asked.  Senator C. W r. Bo,rd, chairman of the committee, on roads, made the motion to turn down the House ■ amendments, which virtually created ! a new bill. The vote on the Board motion was unanimous.  If the House agrees to a conference, as it probably will, committees will be named by the House and Senate to try and reach an agreement .on the bill.  LEADING FRENCH PAPER SAYS SAME ARGUMENTS USED IN 1917.  PARIS. March 7. The Journal des Debats* comment on the American situation says “Senator Lodges* arguments against the league of nations are the name as those used against America’s entry into the war. These argumenta proved false in 1017 and will have the same fate in 1010 in regard to the league of nations.” The article concludes with an expression of confidence in the league which has been shown by all French papers.  TRANSPORTED PRISONER  BY AIRPLANE  tty th** Associated Presa  INDIANAPOLIS. Ind., March 7. -Th** days of the old-fashioned sheriff, with broad-brimmed hat and high boots, who transports his hand-cuffed prisoners by train are nearing an end, in the opinion of state authorities. They peep into the future and predict that the day will come when : prisoners, especially in hurry-up cases will be carried from district to district by airplane.  A man arrested here for robbery in Dayton. O., w*as taken back to j that city via air route. The plane* with a pilot and officer, came from Dayton for the express purpose of I returning the prisoner.  As there was room for only one passenger the Dayton officer turned the prisoner over to the pilot, and returned by train. The officer said the prisoner was safe with the pilot. “The chance of leaping from the train at a station is completely eliminated” he said.  The prisoner was asked if he would waive extradition, after being told of the arrangements to go to Dayton by airplane.  “Sure, 1*11 waive anything to take th** trip,” he replied, with a grin.  CHAISES QUALITIES OF  AMERICAN TROOPS  CARDIFF. Wales, March 7—Testimony to the qualities of some of the American troops in France is given by a girl member of the Woman’s Auxiliary Army Corp in a letter to her home folks here. She w rites:  “W’e are stationed inside an American camp in a huge old French cavalry barracks. We are doing clerical work w r ith hundreds and hundreds of Americans iii the Central Records office. We deal with the whole A mer!-  Women’s Spring Slippers  The Season’s Most Popular Styles  Dainty Oxfords  —Soft Black Kid Oxfords with turned soles, with military and covered French heels, $5.00 and $9.00.  * Clever Colonials  —Black Kid Colonial Pumps with beaded buckles, turned soles and covered wood French heels, $7.50 and $9.00.  SEE THESE NEW SPRING MODELS  The Surprise Store  Established 1903  J15-117 West Main St.  Phone 117   

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