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Ada Evening News: Saturday, February 1, 1919 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News (Newspaper) - February 1, 1919, Ada, Oklahoma                                 Wye liba Cbenmg  VOLUME XV. NUMBER 275.  ADA, OKLAHOMA, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY I, 19&  TWO CENTS THE COPY  OUR  Final Clearance Sale  of  Ail Winter Merchandise  Begins Saturday, Feb. 1st  Special Clearance Prices on:   Ladies’ Ready-to-wear   Men’s Clothing   Boys’ Clothing   Blankets   Ginghams   Domestics   Sheetings  LEAGUE MAV  SETTLE CLAIMS  IHSPITK8 BETWEEN CHINA ANH JAPAN AMONG MATERA TO IIP It RF KURKO  Dress Goods  Th s    is    an unusual opportunity to buy  good merchandise for less than value.  STEVENS-WILSON CO.  OK NOUN CKH REINARTS OF I (UM KS BY AMERICAN SO IJH KRS IN DAKIS.  By lh** A*j«oflat«*d I’rpas  WASHINGTON, Feb. I Central IVrshing in an official report to the Secretary of war today characteriz-* ed sensational reports in French newspapers of assaults and burglar- 1  tea committed in Paris by American soldiers as “gross exaggerations.*' i Pershing recommended that a refu-i tation of the charges be put before ■ the American people.  Bv tie*    Press  PARIS. Feb. I.—No ofticial statement of the details of the compromise j plan for government of former Ger-   ;  man colonies by mandatories has been made to date, but it is understood that use of the word, “colonies" doesn’t limit the scope of the plan to former German colonies, but I it may apply also to Mesopotamia.  Armenia and Palestine. Chinese and | Japanese claims to Taing-Tae, It is understood will be left to the lea-i gue ot nations and believed the same order will prevail regarding Dalmatia and Albania over which Italy and the Jugo-SloVak are at odds. The present program plans a report on the league of nations plans before President Wilson's departure for home.  GERMANY WILL RNOW SOME CONDITIONE OF ALJ J KS THIS MONTH.  AXD KATY SCHEDULES  Both the Katy aud Frisco will make slight changes in their schedule beginning with Sunday. The morning northbound Katy train will  By tho Associated Preen  PARIS, Feb. I.—Preliminary peace terms will probably be presented to Germany along with conditions for further armistice renewal this month, if present plaits remain unchanged. The nations associated against Germany are considering making a start towards the actual treaty by inserting some elementary terms into conditions which will be submitted to the German armistice commission Feb. 17. This decision is reflected also in an examination, now under way, to determine what American troops *it will be necessary to leave in occupied territory.  REPORT ON CASUALTIES  arrive att 4 train at 4 southbound present, aa 10:05.  The Fria been arri va ed to 11:4! that ha tiled to  5 ami tile afternoon clock    The morning  ill ixrrive at 11 20 as at rte- evening train at  OKLAHOMA CITY Feb. I. Seven bills were advanced iii the Holist'  northbound that has it I I :35 will be chang-nd the smit Ii bound been due at 7 45 is sohed-6'46. The (»tlier two trains  will not be changed  APPDOPRIAEION LOR  in the senate at the ses-atternoon, among those in Ie being that prescribing on agriculture and allied ii the public schools. Tin 1  as reported tor cons.dera-d two books on the silk* amemirt)ent by Senator  the  was  one  WAR DEPARTMENT GINKS FIGURES ON I JOSS KS OF VARIOUS DIVISIONS.  By the A-■>.«* lated Press  WASHINGTON. Feb I Official tabulation of casualties by divisions from American expeditionary forces issued today by the war department show the fallowing major casualties from all divisions exclusive of two regiment." of marines att ariled to the second division  Killed in action - __     27.7t>2  Died of wounds _________11,396  Missing in action     14,649  Prisoners________ 2.785  Grand total .Major Casual? <*s 66,592 Figures mr thirty combat divisions include the 336th Texas and Oklahoma National Guards with 1,250 and the 90th Texas, Arizona, oklahoma and New Mexico National army, with 1.58 5 ins jot- casualties In killed in action the first regular division leads the list with 2.3D3.  Makes ^four Breakfast Taste Better  d  Your bridie.  fast tames batter c r tc*r you ase Klenza. Get • tube to try today.  The heaviest loss in prisoners was in  the 28th division. 691 men being taken by the enemy.  OVER 110.000  By i'm a»siM ,41ed Press J WASHINGTON. Feb. I A three < million dollars appropriation to  maintain the national guard at a Strength of 106,000 officers and men  during the next fiscal year was tentatively approved today by the house military affairs committee.  ill  MAM THOUSANDS OI OTHKRS TO HK RKT KASKI) SOON, GKN. MARU! STATES.  Bv Hic Associated Presa  WASHINGTON. F**b I With 61,230 and ‘♦52.4 11 men actually disbanded, demobolization of the army passed the million mark during the past week. General March announced today. The total ordered for early discharge has reached 1.396,000 including 153,000 returning from overseas.  L./e in r*tinct Valkaria.  Iii -••iith**ro 'I •    .**:•.* i- .» ’*    ’    of  • •<H»s|rtcr:ili!** .-I/.* «    D*Uir:ii, v ho h  • nice upon a 11 i tit* ...is an aeL\*» volcano. Rubbles nj V..', iii*    made  it a veritable h * . tomb of cav* *, v bn Ii in th«*se «l.    > are Inhabited. In  fief, the whole u< mil all) is a cit; i l ui inn anthill, densely iHHHtlincd.  NORMAL NOTKS.  Mr and Mrs. Molloy are both with the influenza.  Pres. Gordon made a business trip to Oklahoma City Tuesday, returning Thursday.  Hon. Paul Nesbitt gave an interesting and instructive talk to the students in chapel last Thursday morning.  Oma Laird is ubsent from school on account af illness.  Lester Wedlock who has been in the U S. service for several months has received bis discharge and returned home He was a normal visitor last Saturday.  Butler (Tray who has been in France for some time sent a telegram to his sister \rmelia on Thursday that he has landed in the V. S.  Dorothy Duncan with Miss Cutty as accompanist, gave n Dumber of vocal selections during chapel exercises Wednesday which were much enjoyed by the students.  The basket ball game last night between Francis and East Central was a good fought game resulting in the score ot 21 to 19 lo favor of Francis.  The various classes of the school met in their class rooms yesterday morning at 11:30. Several ot the classes gave literary programs.  and ‘lour sums tho the sena tex?books subjects measure tion includ jects, but an  Tucker eliminated on** of the hooks. The amendment was adopted In view of the studies already included iii such course in the schools it was the opinion of members that proposed increase in textbyok* not necessary. Hence only th*= book was added.  The bill creating a Capitol improvement district, which has to do I with paving streets adjacent to thej capitol, was advanced in the Senate. J It allows the State Board of Affaire to arrange for paving near the Capitol The ^solution by Mr. Thomas; authorizing expenditure of state funds tor aid in road construction and the bill by Mr. Leach abolishing divisions of tile County Court of Beckham County were advanced.  The Mil by Mr. Kerr and others which would provide to some extent a county manager form ot government in Okmulgee. Tulsa and Muskogee counties was being considered in the senate when that body adjourned With some amendments adopted the bill seemed on a fair way to advancement. It would provide for election of|« (Tyiirnian of a County Board of Commissioners, the other two members to be the County Judge and the County Treasurer. The chairman would be put on a salary and required to be on the job all the time. Senator Harrison objected to flu* measure, for he said it would  REV. E. A.  ACCEPTS ADA PASTORATE  Rev. E. A. Hardee has accepted a call to the pastorate of the Second Baptist church of Ada and will enter upon his work Sunday. He will move his family here as soon as he can find a house.  Mr. Hardee is one of the old timers in this part of Oklahoma and is well known in Ada, hence begins his pastorate under very favorable auspices.  New Spring Showing  Coats, Suits, Dresses and Blouses. All the very latest creations and many to select from.  The Famous Cadillac Line of Dresses  School Dresses in Navy Blue, Serge and Shepard Plaids. All Good Styles.  Sizes 6 to 12 Special  $3  Sizes 8 to 12 Special  ;$3  Sizes 15 to 19 Special  $7  MEN’S FURNISHINGS  One lot of good heavy Cotton Sweaters. $1.25 Values______________________ $1  SALE THIS WEEK ON  Men’s and Boys’ Suits, Overcoats and Mackinaws.  DEPARTMENT STORE  S.Af. SHAW, PROP.  PHONE ll    Established    iii    1902    ADA,    OKLA,  I  TROOPS REMOVED FRUM EXPLOSION HEES STRANDED VESSEL AND MAIMS MANY  ll  There is a flew* sensation •waiting you — the Cool, Clean Klenzo Feeling on your teeth and tongue. It Isn’t merely a taste It’s a testing • of clean-ness — cleanness that is imparted to the tiny, little taste nerves, treeing them of stale secretions that make your mouth feel hot and sticky.  02  J    OE UTA I  *    r a c t < f  Job for a Statistician.  Some day a clever -r. nMi< ..m nut) publish seine i»r-(Nilling fir tire* *du»w* lug bmv much time iv <  roitd depotv bi folk' i time for train- ||, iM  Moines Hog * h r.  ted ut rail* arrive on lute. — De*  Well, Thut Mall CM One!  Senator Luther Harrison Is afraid of Postmaster General Burleson. When the Senate was considering endorsing the Bankhead rider to the post office bill. which would allow federal road ald for the states, Harrison wanted to know if the bill would give Burleson control of the public highways. Oklahoman.  OE NT Al.  CO E m£  Gwin & Mays  That Photo In Khaki  Are the ones you had made permanent?  Many of these Photon will fade. Why not let us make one for you?  We guarantee ours IVrmiinent.  Stairs Studio  PHONE 34  NIN ETI KTH DIVISION SOLDIERS FAHS THROUGH DALITS  DALLAS, Feb. I. Wearing wound stripes and insignia of the Ninetieth Division, thirty-five soldiers passed through Dallas en route to Camp Logan yesterday. They spent several hours in Dallas and through the good offices ot the Red Cross they were shown Dallas in automobiles by Dallas citizens. The ooys Had been gassed, a majority of them, and only a small number bad been wounded with shell or shrapnel. They were with the Ninetieth Division, composed of Texas and Oklahoma men trained at Camp Travis, when s.# many men were killed and wounded in the first days of the American offensive. One of the men had been bathed, almost completely with mustard gas, the most horrible of all Hun poisons and tiiough he was almost a skeleton, he was as Jolly and happy as the others.  practically prevent the tanners from becoming members of the board.  Senator I humus offered an amend* ment. which was adopted, that included his county < Comanche) in the bill  the House in committee of the whole recommended for passage the bill by Mr Woodward providing tor publication of assessments before the Board of Equalization; by Mr. Storms declaring prairie dogs a nuisance;  Mr. Glasser imposing certain duties on vendors before taking possession ot property; Mr. Woodward, relating to the expenditure by counties of mon?y for farm demonstration work and horn** economics, Mr. Street, relating to establishment and maintenance of municipal cemeteries; Mr.  Morgan, providing for increase of pay for jurors; Mr. Hight, creating office of County Court stenographer.  The bill by Mr. Woodward relating to tax assessments, it was explained, would reveal by publication in a newspaper property renditions as date of his discharge. The government  By tin-    d    Breva  LONDON, Feb. I. Serious rioting occurred Friday in the mining districts of Lanarkshire, particularly at Bells Hills, where much property damage resulted. In course of the rioting, the police used their clubs f reel}*.  MAJOR REDE COMMENDS  DISCHARGED ADA SOLDIER  The following letter has been received by Win. Cantrell regarding his son, William Jr., who has just received his discharge from the army: “Headquarters 56th Field Artillery, FT. Sill. Okla.. Jan. 29th, 1919.  Mr. William Cantrell. 420*W. Stockton. Ada, Okla.  My Dear Sir:  Today your soldiei will receive his honorable discharge and start for home.  He is bringing back many fine qualities of body and mind which he has required or developed in the military service. The army has done everything it could do to make him strong, fine, self-reliant, yet self-con-, trolled. It returns him to you a better man because of his recent ex- ] perience.  You have been an important factor of that great army of encouragement and enthusiasm which helped to make him and us all better soldiers. You can now be a great help in keeping alive the good qualities he is bringing back from the army, in helping him to be as good a citizen as he has been a good soldier.  His fare and necessary expenses to his hc*nie will be paid by the government. He will receive all pay due him. He may, if he wishes, wear his uniform for three months from the  By th*' Associated Presa  SOUTHAMPTON. Eng., Feb. I.  All t roops aboard the Amel iran tran -port Narragansett which ran ashore j last nighty off the east end of the Isle of Wight*have been removed by tugs and local lifeboats.  $  CONFEDERATE VETERANS WILL MEET SUNDAY AFTERNOON  Win. Byrd Camp, IT. C. V., will hold its regular monthly meeting Sunday afternoon at 2:30, at the city hall. A cordial invitation to the public to attend.  Bv th** Associated Pres*  BRUSSELS,' Feb. L —Sixty Gel man prisoners, three French officers and one American were killed and many injured Friday when a munition train exploded on the railway between Aubange and Longwy. The accident was due to the soldiers dropping a shell.  Christian Science.  Christian Science services at 11 a. rn, at 111 North Broadway. Subject: Love.  Piano Need Tuning?  Our stock of new spring dresses, Bishop, the reliable tuner of Okla-suits and coats are strikingly beauti- horns City is here. Phone 654 soon. fill. Burks’ Style Shop. 1-31-21 I    2-1 Sat &, VV 4t*  Special Offering This Week  TO RETURN SMITH St WESSON  PLA NT TO OWNERS TODAY.  SPRINGFIELD, Mane., Feb. I.— The National Operating Corporation, which took over the Smith & Wesson plant in this city Sept. 16. last, on behalf of the government, will turn the factory over to its original owners today. The operating corporation was formed under govrnment auspices after the company had de* dined to accept findings of the War Labor Board in a controversy between the company and its employes.  given in by the owner, who does so j under oath. It was also explained that this would remedy the tax-dodging. which is complained of considerably.  When the House adjourned this evening it went over to Monday so as to allow certain committees to visit i state institutions on Saturday. These committees and the places they will visit are:  To visit Confederate Home at Ardmore and Boys Training School at Pauls Valley:    Messrs.    Henry, Gault  and Stevenson; Asylum at Vinita and Orphans Home at Pryor, Messrs. Sto- I Vail, Fitzgerald of Klow’a, Cheatham, Morris and Ewing; Oklahoma College for Women. Messrs. Scott, Jack- j son. Walden. Glascoe and Crawford; I State Reformatory at Granite, Mw- j Hrs. Webb, Hornbeck. Barker, Hod- j son and Hight; State Penitentiary at McAlester. Melters. Harrison, Graves, j Dabney, Disney and Pryor; School j for Deaf and Dumb at Sulphur. Met*-; ars. McNabb, Broadbent and Ebey; j Detention Home for Girls, near here, I Messrs. Robertson, Fitzgerald of Pittsburg, Smith of# Bryan. Cummings, Woodward. Stokes, Hay, Anglin and Glasser.  will also allow him to keep up, for the benefit of his family, his insurance at the very low rate he is now paying.  His return to civil life will bring new problems for you both to solve. The qualities he is bringing back from the army will help you now, as your encouragement helped him while he was away, and in your hands and his, rests the future of our country’.  He has done his duty well, and his comrades bid him good-bye with deep regret and wish him every success after he returns home that spot in every man’s heart no other place can fill.    Sincerely    yours,  O. ROSS REDE. Major 56th F. A., Commanding Regiment.  Curtain Fabrics 25 cents yard  TI  The High School Chorus announces It is bringing “Princess Chrysanthemum” to town soon. Watch for the date,  #     J    2-1-tf  The Fragrant Weed.  ti-** of tobacco was first diwcov-■ i ut America when Columbo- ie •, cut bis first party to explore n- i aud of Cuba. It was first oh CV*.. that these herbs were bunted ».  4  carried by the native** to perfume . •rn* «*i\cs. It was luter discovered ii.ii •itc'*e herbs were ulso list'd for hew tig. and Inter us America was  1  iv**t up and explore!. It wus nbserv-i »>• * they were smoked in large  . . .Ut *l*».  It will be a long time, indeed, before you will be able to equal these values in Draperies. This is an L opportunity no home-makers should miss. The " assortment is large, including Scrims, Nets, Swisses and Novelties.  Former Prices 29c, 35c and 50c, Now,. Yard __25c Come and See what these Values Mean!  The Surprise Store  Established 1903  115-117 West Main St.  Phone 117  ■  .....   

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