Ada Evening News, January 29, 1919

Ada Evening News

January 29, 1919

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Issue date: Wednesday, January 29, 1919

Pages available: 4

Previous edition: Tuesday, January 28, 1919

Next edition: Thursday, January 30, 1919

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Publication name: Ada Evening News

Location: Ada, Oklahoma

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Years available: 1904 - 1978

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All text in the Ada Evening News January 29, 1919, Page 1.

Ada Evening News (Newspaper) - January 29, 1919, Ada, Oklahoma ®he &ba Ctoentng VOLUME XV. NUMBER 272. Y Copyright 1918 I Un Schaffner i Marx Good clothes at peace prices OU can get the best clothes made at peace prices. If you’ve been war saving, change to peace-saving. W e’ve marked lower prices on a lot of oui* tine suits and overcoats; sort of a peace celebration; a chance for men coming home from the* camps of war to get civilian clothes economically f a chance for men who have been here all the time to save some money. Hart Schaffner & Marx anchother Clothes at Money-Saving Prices. Men's $10 Overcoats Clearance Price____________ Men’s $18 Suits and Overcoats, Clearance Price____________ Men’s $25 Suits and Overcoats, Clearance Price__________ Men’s $35 Suits and Overcoats, Clearance Price----------- Men’s $40 Suits and Overcoats Clearance Price------------ STEVENS-WILSON CO. ■HICE SHE ii 11 $6.95 $12.95 $16.95 $24.50 $29.50■ ADA. OKLAHOMA, WEDNESDAY. JANUARY 29. 1919. • TWO CENTS THE COPY DIMM OF ACl'lXG SKOK ICT A HY OF STATH VAKIKO OFI X IONS MAY PKOIA>NU DECLARK* IT ADOPTED. KF- 1 MSCI SKIRX OF MATT KH Oh I FCT! VK JAX, IO, I WSO.    4 XIX THOI j. IV' t In* Associated Press WASHINGTON. Jan. 29. Ratification of the prohibition amendment lo the federal constitution ''as proclaimed . formally today by Actins Secretary of State Frank L. Colk. ' he proclamation was dated today bul legal authorities say under its terms prohibition becomes effective January 16, 10 20. HOUSE PASSES SISO PER CAPUA BILE lt> th** A'-soriuted Press PARIS, Jan. 29. The future of colonies taken from Germany has assumed a place as I he most interesting of tin* immediate phases of the many sided problems being compared by the supreme council of the peace congress. Hearings now being moved by the council to conference members and colonial experts upon the disposition of the colonies. The plan discussed Monday providing for international control of the colonies is still subject to complete readjustment. The hearings have progressed to a point where the existence of views greatly at variance with these state in Wilson’s fourteen points are believed. This has demanded that American delegates urge the adoption of the American plan at the very outset. Polish Question Vj». jPARIS, Jan. 20 - The supreme MAJORITY SOCIALISTS LRAD IX PRUSSIAN ELECTIONS. LIGHT VOTE POLLER. I'.3* the Associated Pres* BERLIN, Jan. 27.—The sharp win-t*>r weather and unusual number of stay at homes are held responsible for the small vote at Sunday’s Prussian elections as compared with the balloting for national assembly eight days ago. Returns to 3 o’clock today give the social democratic party a big lead in greater Berlin where they were already credited with two-thirds of the seats in the new parliament. Democrats, clericals, conservatives and national liberty parties will divide the remainder. Scattering returns from other sections of Prussia I indicate that the majority socialists are everywhere maintaining their lead. to be given to the allied mission to    _ Poland recently authorized. The pro- j grant called for the appearance of : By the Associated Presa Polish and Czechoslovak represen- WASHINGTON, Jan. 29.— Jouett tat iv es before the council to present Chouse of Kinsley, .Kans., was nomi-their views.    nated today by President Wilson to 9    —....... be assistant secretary of the treasury. John Skelton Williams is nominated for another term as comptroller of the currency. WASHINGTON. Jan. 29. The Indian appropriation bill has passed the house carrying many items of interest to Oklahoma. Among them    .    ,    ,    .    . wa* one for $ ISS OOO for the sn- council or the peace conference had perintendent for the Five Civilized before It on amembl'nB ;h » morale j Tribes, with a provision authorizing Jhe^ polis— qiieenon and instruction, him to pay all undisputed claims and to approve all uncontested agricultural and mineral leases. It provides for an appeal to the secretary of the interior only in contested claims and leases. It contains an appropriation of $225,000 in aid OI the common schools in eastern Oklahoma, a provision for a 1150 per capita payment for the Choctaws and Chickasaws, an item appropriating $15,000 for Ute competency commission for the Five Civilized Tribes, and one of $43,000 for the Cherokee Orphan Training School ne ir Tahlequah. There is a provision in the bill permitting the reoffering of the unsold and forfeited coal and asphalt deposits in October and November, 1919.    * It contains ar. Bern of $85,000 for prob;.ie attorneys, but their activities are confined lo restricted allottees and their heirs, and an Item making an appropriation for the suppression of the liquor traffic, under which it is a criminal offense to have liquor in one's possession in the Indian IWO APPOINTMENTS IL tilt* Ay^M'iatt'd Pr#s»- COr EN HAGEN, Jan. 29. The Norwegian sailors organization passed a resolution declining assistance in carrying food to Germany, until Germany pays an indemnity of $4.-000,000 for organization members who were submarine victims. OCFAX ll \TFs (’IT; COTTON GOES HIGHER WASHINGTON. Jan. 29 —Reduc- Unloading Winter Shoes AT THE TIME NEEDED 36 pairs Ladies’ Patent Leather Button Shoes, $3 value..... $1.95 One Lot Ladies’ Shoes $6 values $3.75 One Lot of Ladies’ Black Kid Lace Boots, Military Heel $4.45 Men's and Boys' Bootees Entire stock at reduced prices—this is the time of year that they are in most demand ANNOUNCEMENT New Spring Goods now arriving and being placed in stock— Coats, Suits, Dresses and Hats too numerous to describe and quote prices on. Whether you wish to buy or not, come in and see the line. DEPARTMENT STORE t_. _______ __    ....    ______ tions of nearly 75 per cent in trans country, or where the sale or intro- atlantic freight rates on cotton car nies. It. H. CARMER IMES AT WETUMKA The many friends of Mrs. Clarence West and Misses Zuma and Lola Horton will be grieved to learn of the death of their mother, Mrs. Robert H. Palmer this morning at 5 o’clock at her home in Wetumka. Mrs. West and Miss Zuma and Miss Lola Horton called Sunday to their mother’s bedside. Death followed an attack of pneumonia from which deceased had suffered only a few days, but having        —............................ previously experienced an attack of |    ’    ~    ”    i heart trouble was unable to with- MEMBER 90TH DIVISION    .again several times in the Argonne stand a severe case of pneumonia.    RETURNS    TO    ADA    sector. He was wounded twice and Mrs. Palmer resided at Ada for a!    .    | spent about two months in the hos- short time some years ago, hut mov- 1 Perry M. bcott, whose mother lives j pital. He sajs going ovei the top in. PHONE 77 S.M. SHAW, PROP. Established in 1002 AOA, OKLA. duction of liquor is prohibited by treaty or by statute The language is so framed as to make it enforceable in Oklahoma. The principal fight on the bill was over what was known as the Hast tied in American bottoms, effective immediately, were announced today by the shipping board’s division of operations. Sweeping, decreases were made yesterday in rates on general freight to meet cuts by British slop ed from here to Wetumka where she was living at the time of her death. The body will be ?ield until the ar- in Ada, returned today from Camp Bowie where he received his discharge from the army. Mr. Scott rival of hor son Archie, who is in the was a member of the famous Nineth oouon were mane o> Bout.lorn o.ua- Th(,r(. wer(, sewral ,hln(ts (0 be tors an. repetitive* In conference I CUMej in tUe. mwtin(t. (lather I. with shipping board officials, and the ..    hi.    resiirnatlol ings* amendment, giving the superin- owners, and some shipping board of tendent for the Five Civilized Tribes flcials regarded today’s announcement at Muskogee full authority to pay un- as presaging a rate war between the disputed claims and approve uncon- new American merchant marine and tested leases. The amendment was British shipping interests, carried by    a large    majority.    Requests    for    the    cut    in    rates    on cotton    were    made    by    Southern    Sena- ARA SCHOOL* Cl AWI NG I TRST SEMESTER’S WORK Next week will end the work outlined in the course of study of Ada public schools for the first semester. This is* a little later than the middle of the term due to the closing of the schools in    the fall    because of    the    influenza epidemic.    The examinations will be given Thursday and Friday and promotions made February IO at which time the work of the ow' semester starts. Supt. Hickman states that patrons should take notice and see that their children who have not enrolled should do so the first day. Particularly is this true of children who have just become of scholastic age entering school for the first time. After three weeks time it will be Impossible to take in beginners. navy stationed off the coast of Con-necticutt. The funeral and burial will be in Wetumka. Wesley Bible Class Reorganize*. division and was on the battle front for approximately five months. He wTent over the top at St. Mihiel and the St. Mihiel front wras easy, as the Germans were mostly on ‘the run, but the fighting in the Argonne was deadly in the extreme. Mr. Scott went to Camp Travis from Denison, Tex., but will make Ada his home in the future. announcement first came from the Capitol. The effect on the price of cotton on the New York and New Orleans exchanges was electric, the price on the old contract months advancing $10 a bale the limit of fluctuation premitted in a single day l*ast evening the Wesley class of Hie Methodist church met in the parlors and held a business session. be dis-Van Meter tendered his resignation as president of the class and it was accepted. A nominative committee was appointed to nominate a new member for president. Several other committees were appointed. Among them are the following:' A Service Flag and Honor Roll Commit- ..UA  ..... I' • ' .........   —    f T    *    CCI    five    JI    I Cl £•>    Cl ZI Vt    IZVIIVl under the law controlling dealings    aro    to    get    the    names    of    all in futures. Makes ^tfour Breakfast Taste Better the men who went into the service. A Membrship Committee, and a Social Committee. These committees are ready for work and there is no doubt but that the class will go. A social has been planned for Thursday. February 6. AI IHE PIA! YI OUR brei’.? XATU Mc*    START RIOT WHEN STRIKE COMMITTEE GOVERNS AMERICAN COMMITTEE AK-    <    ITV.    MAXY    WINDOWS BIV RS. FIVE KILLER.    SMASHED. AMERICAN. The famous Paramount company presents Wfm. S. Hart in the drama. The Narrow Trail. This is a story of outdoor life in the great West and is full of excitement and adventures. Bf th*- A amidated Pres# LAIBACH, Jan. 29. - Reporta from Marburg state that quite a serious disturbance broke out there on the arrival of the American ‘’debarkation committee”, under command of Colonel Miles. It la reported that five persons were killed and thirty Injured. Marburg is a town in Styraia. Ametria, on the Drave river. That Photo In Khaki Are the ones you had made permanent? Many of these Photos will fade. Why not let us make one for you? We guarantee ours IVruiaiiofit. Stairs Studio PHONE S4 Bf iii** Associated Pit**** BELFAST. Jan. 29. Much rioting i in dark streets occurred last night J and many plate glass windows on prominent streets broken. The police frequetly charged with clubs on the I rioteers. Strike Committee Assume* Authority LONDON, Jan 29.- The Belfast strike committee, which wields immense power, has taken upon itself I with the involuntary consent or the civil authorities some of the attributes of an “industrial soviet,” the Belfast correspondent of the Manchester Guardian reports. The strike committee, however, the dispatch adds, is peremptorily discouraging violence. RtiL'li CkNfcl Miners Strike. LONDON, Jan. 29.—Miners in many collieries in West Holland have struck in sympathy with the strikers at Clyde. It Is announced that the Clyde strikers number 70,000. LIBERTY. The Pacemakers will present the Gambler and the Lady, featuring fin Ethel Montrose. The picture program features Wm. Desmond in the five-part Triangle drama, Beyond the Shadow'. batter f ftvr you us# Klenzcv Get a tube to try today. There is a new sensation awaiting you — i the Cool, Clean Klenzo Feeling on your teeth end tongue. It Isn’t merely a taste. It’s ates-• of r/eara-nes. -cleanness that is im pa nett to the tiny, little taste nerves. Mrs. C. K. Gunning received a big birthday surprise last evening, at her home on South Broadway. Several of her friends came over and spent a large part of tho evening in fun and entertainment. A very pleasant evening was spent by all and all left hoping that Mrs. Cunning would have many more birthdays as pleasant as this one. freeing them of stale secretions that make your mouth feel bot and sticky. Clarence Wallace and Lee McKinney have written Mr. E. A. MacMillan that they are occupying German ground. The pictures of their billets are of hotels and Inns that have been taken over Tor that purpose. They gave no hint as to whe they would be home. DISTILLERS WILL FIG HT A M EX DM ENT NEW YORK, Jan. 29.— Mapping out of a legal campaign to make inoperative the ratification of the federal prohibition amendment was begun at a meeting here today of an executive committee representing the Distillers’ Association of America. The committee, of which Samuel Wollner of Peoria, 111., is chairman, met in executive session and with-t held announcement of w'hat action would be undertaken pending furth-i er deliberation. OKMULGEE VOTES TO UUY COUNCIL HOUSE OKMULGEE, Okla., Jan. 29.—A municipal bond issue of $100,000 with which the city is to purchase the Creek council house here was approved at a special election today by a majority of 200. Okmulgee women voted for the first time. ARA HIGH SCHOOL APPLIES KOR N. W. MEMBERSHIP. || The Ada high school has made application for affiliation in the Northwestern Association of schools and colleges. Any. high school affiliated with the Association can enter its graduates In any college in the association without examiation. hence the value of the membership. DENTAL CREME WEATHER FORECAST. Fair weather is the Thursday. outlook for Notice. The band will meet at the county clerk’s office tonight for rehearsal. Gwin & Mays PUBLIC CHAPEL EXERCISES AT NORMAL TOMORROW. * President J. M. Gordon of the Normal announces that Hon. Paul Nesbitt will address the students of the Normal and the citizens of the town at 11:30 otinorrow in the college auditorium. Mr. Gordon would be I pleased for many citizens of the city I to be present to hear this address. sBSSBBm FIRST SHOWING OF SILK PETTICOATS FOR SPRING $3.50 TO $12.50 There are Jerseys, Satins and Taffetas. Some in solid colors, some in all Jersey with accordion plaited ruffles,' also handsome Pussy Willow Taffetas in Oriental Designs. New Jersey Silk Bloomers in Navy, White. and Emerald. Priced at J___________$3.50 See Them Today. The Surprise Store , Established 1903 J15-117 West Main St. Phone 117 ;

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