Saturday, January 4, 1919

Ada Evening News

Location: Ada, Oklahoma

Page: 1

Other pages in this edition:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

Who (or what) are you looking for?

Find old articles about anyone, in the World’s Largest Newspaper Archive!

Other Newspapers from Ada, Oklahoma

Loading...

Other Editions from Saturday, January 4, 1919

Loading...

Text Content of Page 1 of Ada Evening News on Saturday, January 4, 1919

Ada Evening News (Newspaper) - January 4, 1919, Ada, Oklahoma Z\)t    I Cbentng volume xv. NUMBER 251 ADA, OKLAHOMA, SATURDAY, JANUARY 4, 1919. TWO CENTS THE COPY Everybody Should Have Good Shoes for this Kind of Weather We can fit you correctly in the right kind of Shoes. —FOR MEN Good Styles from Edwin Clapp, Howard & Foster, Beacon and Other Good Makers at $4 to $12 GERMANY IL WAR PATH BE FED LAST I INVADERS KOMMA 111) LEMBERG, CHIRP (ITV OF GALICIA, REPORT SAYS. HOOYER OUTLINES PLANS FOK FEEDING HUNGRY POPULATION OF EUROPE. ROBBING AND MURDERING PEASANTS IN ADVANCE TOWARDS WEST. IL th** AMiOctnt*<l Bick* COPENHAGEN, Jan. 4.—Freeh I fighting has occurred during the last few days around Lemberg, where I Ukrainian troops are progressing and bombarding the city, according to j Vienna dispatches to the Polit!ken. I The electrical works at homburg have I been destroyed and considerable oth-, er damage done In The FOR WOMEN finest of Kid Boots, in Brown, Gray and Black, from Selby and Sorosis. $5 to $12 - Good Shoes for Boys, for Girls and for the very little feet. $1.50 to $5 Men's Good Heavy work shoes,made to stand hard use and rough weather Special Sale This Week on Blankets Overcoats. See Our Windows. and Men’s STEVENS-WILSON CO. ROME PAYS AMERICAN PRESIDENT HIGHEST HONOR IN GIFT OF CITY. the AnhocIwUhI Nvm PARIS, Jan. 4.—Herbert C. Hoover, newly appointed director of allied food relief work iii newly liberated neutral and enemy territories in Europe, told the Associated Press today that German ships totaling nearly 3,- 000.000 tons will be used to carry food to Europe and that German pas-sengei boats will be utilised to carry Americans home. Liberated territories will be fed first according to Hoover. Food to the amount of many millions of dollars must be imported into Europe to provide for the needs of the people between now and July 1. The problem of financing the project is now' being considered by the president, Hoover said. In discussing the food situation in Germany Hoover said the United States has thirty-eight officers traveling through the country making an investigation and their reporta not ; complete enough for a definite statement. In any event, he indicated that Germany will be fed last. tty Sl»«- Asocial,■»! Pres* WARSAW, Jan. 4.—Bolshevist forcer are reported in the outskirts of Vilna and towns on the railway between Minsk and Brest-Litovsk, said to have been occupied by them. The bolshevik! are reported to be burning buildings and robbing and murdering peasants as they advance. Throngs of refugees are arriving here. nu ti w ME ORDER OF KUSI NESS OF COMING CONFERENCE ANNOUNCED TO PUBLIC. By th** Assoria tnt l*tv*> ROME, Friday, Jan. 3. President Wilson became a cit lien of Rome tonight. The ceremony took place in the historic capitol designed by Michael Angelo and redolent with suggestions of ancient and medieval Rome. Assisting in the service were King Victor Emmanuel, Queeu Helena. Italian cabinet members, diplomatic corps members, including Ambassador and Mrs. Page, and municipal and military authorities. At the conclusion of the ceremony President Wilson addressed the assembled dignitaries, thanking Italy for his cordia! reception and honors conferred THREE DEATHS IN STONEWALL VICINI]! WILSON ASKS $1<HMNHMMM> FOR FAMINE RELIEF IN EUROPE. WASHINGTON, Jan. 4. Congress was asked today by President Wilson in a message transmitted through the ' a general state department to appropriate questions $100,000,000 for relief of famine sufferers in Europe. It is understood that the money is wanted shiefly to send food into sections of Western Russia, Poland and Austria-Hungary. Bl tho As>««iHtl*ii I'lVSS PARIS, Jan. 4.—(Havas)—The peace conference, according to the Petit Baisian, will proceed as follows: First, a conference of the four great powers. Second, representatives of Belgium and Serbia to be admitted for study of the general situation. Third, admission of the other allies for conference on the problems in which they areinterested. Fourth, presentation of conditions successively to Germany, Turkey, German Austria, Bulgaria and Hungary, and signing of peace preliminaries. Fifth, conference concerning the of a league of nations, freedom of the seas, limitation of armaments, and related topics. AT THE PEAT Notice. The partnership formerly existing between C. W. Floyd and O. J. Davidson has been dissolved, th* 4 firm of ■Davidson & Floyd having disposed of its grocery business. C. W FLOYD. 1-2-31    O.    J. DAVIDSON. Cash Wood Yard. Wood and coal on quick delivery. 563 North Broadway.    12-4-tf Baby’s Dimples We know how to get em. Phone for appointment. Stairs Studio PHONE 34 SUGGESTS REGISTERING LAD! VOTERS OE ADA Commissioiier J*. H. Deal is anxious for the ladies to have the opportunity ot casting their first vote at the coming bond election and has written the following letter to J. A. Cowling, county registrar: ‘Dear Sir: “We will have an election in this city on the 20th in t to vote on a bond issue. “We are anxiou- that the ladies have an opportunity to vote and kindly ask that you take the necessary steps to have the books opened for registration in time fox them to qualify for this election. “Kindly advise me at your earliest convenience as to what action you will take in this matter.” Huh) May a urn per. Ruby May Jumper, 15-year-old daughter of P. \Y Jumper and wife, died at their home two miles south of Stonewall last Saturday morning after an illness of only a few days. They had recently moved here | from Clarksville, Ark., having pur-| chased the Jack Anderson farm, where they now reside. Funeral services were conducted I by Rev. O. B. Holland and interment was at Stonewall cemetery. Jim Hensler. Jim Hensler. Avell known farmer and gin man. died at home of Sol    appears    in    the Moss, north ot Stonewall. Wednesday    tamed    Ladies, night at ll o’clock, after a short siege of influenza. Deceased was about 35 years old, and moved to Stonewall from Allen several years ago During his residence here he had formed a large circle oi friends who will regret to learn of his untimely death. Smile Moss. Sudie Moss, 16 year old daughter of Mr. aud Mrs Sol Moss, died at their home north of Stonewall, Wednesday morning, after a two days illness of influenza. >he was a pupil iii tile Stonewall public schools, and attended school Monday, when she seemed to be in the best of health. Stonewall News. AMERICAN Mary Miles Minter is presented in the play, Mary Climbs the Heights. It is a story that pleases young and old alike, so full is it of everything that makes a story complete in every detail. I JI BERTY. The Lure of the Circus is a splendid serial, the first episode of which will be presented this evening. The noted star, Eddie Polo, is featured. Get un even start and keep up with this wonderful story. Alice Howell two reel comedy, Un-The Screen Magazine will also be presented. WILSON CALLS ON POPE BENEDICT By the Associated Press ROME, Jan. 4.-—President Wilson today was received at the vatican by Pope Benedict. The president’s arrival was announced by the master of chamber t othe pope, who awaited the president in the throne room where two gilded chairs had been placed. The president w’as admitted immediately to the pope's audience. NEW FOOTWEAR NOW IN DEMAND As usual, we have a stock sufficient to meet all demands. “Footwear of Quality.” WOMEN’S SHOES In Brown, Gray, Field Mouse and Black, these are in most demand at popular prices. $2.50 to $12 FREE! EREE! With each pair of Girl Shoes we will give this week a Baby Doll Free. With each pair of Boys’ Shoes we will give this w'eek a Bag of Marvels Free. MEW'S SHOES Here you will find the most durable Shoes on the market today for Dress or for hard work. THE NETTLETON SHOE FOR MEN This Store is Headquarters for Nettleton Shoes for Men. Shoes From $2.50 to $12 DEPARTMENT STORE OHO Mf 77 S.M. SHAW, PROP. ^oablisbed In 1009 ADA, OKLA. Have Your Pictures Framed. The latest in molding and pictures.—Blankenship A Cummins, Undertakers, 203 East Main. Phone 692.    12-12-tf “Get Tagged” Sunday at the First Methodist church. The minister in his message will deal with the crying call of the world for the gospel of the Son of God.    it Ri<*MoIution of Partnership. The partnership between B. F. J ones anti Homer Howard in the drayage business has been dissolved, the undersigned succeeding to the business of the firm. 12-31-tf    B. F. JONES. Where Are You To Blankenship A Cum lins, undertakers, to have my pictures framed.    12-11-4! GRANT IRWIN MOVES i o t orner of Twelfth and Townsend, where I am better prepared than ever to serve you with Buick cars and Pints.    GRANT    IRWIN. Phone No. 2. I We take orders up to 4 o’clock p. rn. for that afternoon delivery.-— Rains Bios.    l-3-2t Kidney weakness, bladder troubles and digestive disorders are all within th** curative power of Brickly Ash Bitters As a tonic for the kidneys and urinary organs it has proved its value. Brice $1.25 per bottle. Gwin A Mays Drug Co., Special Agents. OKLAHOMA COLLECTED $112,275 INHERITANCE TAXES IN 10IH. OKLAHOMA CITY. Jan. I—In I heritance taxes collected for Oklahoma during 1*18 amounted to $112,-2 75. according to figures given today by Ben Watt, who has located and . collected the taxes. Of this amount i $76,630 was collected on non-resi-dent estates and $36*545 from resi- j dents of the state. Collections were made from eighty-four estates and in j fifty-seven counties. Previous to j 1916 the largest amount of inhere I ta nee taxes collected a year was about I $ 10,000: in 1916 the amount col- | letted was $25,269 and in 1917 \ $54,000. There were tTfenty-one j non-resident estates from which the 1 tax was collected and sixty-three res- : ident estates. Some change iii the handling of I ithe inheritance tax probably will be th I , (    ’-pl    .    °    .     1>ll f , ,f JI'*T I recommended to the Legislature. It * *    ’    *     111    u>    IS    first,    j win be proposed to include this as a ROFF \\ Vl,LOBs VRA HIGH IN BASKETBALL. The score of the boys basketball game between Roff and Ada High Schools, resulted in 70-13 in favor of Ada’s opponents. The game was a clean one but the Roff boys had the Cherry Bark Collab Syrup Children like it because it tastes like Rich, Ripe, Red Cherries. The Flavor is fine, the effect is perfect. When that live blond headed boy gets to coughing tonight give him some Rexall Cherry Bark Cough Syrup. The coughing stops instantly, and little blondy sleeps soundly and sweetly. Try Cherry Bark for the little folks. 30c, 60c, $1—and grown ups like it too. Gtfin <S- Mays Drug Co. resigned Edwards < ’ity s< h«ml Notes. Mrs. William Gray has her position and Mrs. T. M. elected to succeed her. Mrs. (’allie Mao Smith and Miss Lucite Harrison have been out on account of illness. Miss Juanita Ringer, who was detained at home after the holidays by illness, returned Wednesday. Miss Maggie Cameron has been elected to the domestic science department, succeeding Mrs. Maude I ittntau, who resigned at her marriage. Miss Cameron also has charge of the girls’ athletics. I) T. Bradshaw, recently discharged from. the S. A. T. C. has been j elected to succeed Miss Cameron in j the position she formerly held. (’barley Rayburn, recently dis-I charged from the university S. A. T. C. haB been elected to the head of I the manual training department, sue-j reeding J. I. Davis, resigned. He al-j so has charge of the military train-j ing and athletics. Atilt EEM ENT ON STATUS OF EX-KAISER REPORTED. AMSTERDAM, Jan. 4.™ The British and Dutch Governments have arrived at an agreement regarding the status of the former German Emperor. according to a dispatch to the Telegraaf from*The Hague. game of the season for the High School. lane I p. Bill Crawford ______ Hardy Roach_______ Guy Orr________ Robert Bryant_____ Don Evans_______ Substitutes:    Earl Cunning, and Harvey Neely. Charley Rayburn.  — Center — „ Forward ------ Guard Forward ----- Guard Kent em. Chas. Coach. ; BACK LUCE A BOARD? IT’S YOUR KIDNEYS There’s no use suffering from the awful ng-*ny of lamp hack. Don’t wait till it **passes off.” It ouly conics back. I iud the cause and stop it. Diseased ; conditions of kidneys ars usually indi-j ca tod by stiff lame backo and other • wrenching J •gins, which are nature’s algin* !j for help! Here’s the remedy, Wnrtt you feel <!ie ii * .*J tv. »:•*» a of i. in or cxpeti-I jence any < £ those s.vratit *ms<, get busy i Ct Mice. Co to your . .ggiit aud get box rf Ti*** tv.re, < min; » GOLD I BUAL 3! mr; n Oil Capsules, Im* oiled fr* -u every to on til from tho laboratories in Haarlem, Holland. proposed part of Cie duties of the Attorney General’s office, with authority for him to designate some one to attend to that work exclusively. MARINE MILLARD FORR HOME FROM FRANCK Millard Ford, son of S. M. Ford, who lives east of Ada, is at home on a furlough. He has been with the marines and went through the w’orst of the fighting in France. In course of the victorious drive by this force, w'ell named the “devil dogs” by the Huns who felt the force of fhelr on-set, he was badly wounded and gassed and is just now recovering from 1 this frightful experience. The war department being two or three months behind with the casualty list, his name is just now appearing. J THE WORLD HAS NEVER KNOWN IA GREATER SELLER Agents ei-j titer sex. Take orders for “Ameri-i ca’s War for Humanity and Complete History of World War” $2 OO book J 50 per cent commission. Outfits ; and books ready. Blesses running I day and night. Big records from j every state, average commissions per : agent $21 a day. Send 10c for mailing FREE outfit. F. B. Dickersou Co., Detroit, Mio hr*.    1-4-lt* For over t v.o lr urn*'ii yo^rs they hr* vc lr en Reining the sick. Why not ( y I let ? r *M eve i y'vhtre by re* Ui* druggist^ iu fecal* ii jpacksges. uggiiA'j iu iii oc    Mem In I help \Oll II VIDAL* niff be COLD MEDAL” i* Ic J pi buck if they” do CV I—    ... Aah tut “GDld sure the nam© on th© box. Start to Sunday School the first Sunday in 1919. We’ll ’ Tag” you and wish you well on a happy journey if you will find your place at the First Methodist church. We have the Sunday school for all Methodists. Just Arrived I STUN NI NG N E VV FOOT WHA R EXTRAORDINARY—KOTH AS TO STYLE AND QUALITY. TRIM, FASHIONABLE, GOOD looking lace models that express the last word in footwear smartness, and w r ith the highest grade shoe making aud material as the basis for true admiration — these cannot be excelled. They’re in Browns, Grey* and Blacks. Priced at $7, $1). $10. $11.50 and $12.50 The Surprise Store Established 19CJ J15-117, West Main St. -Phone 117 %

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8