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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: December 21, 1905 - Page 1

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Publication: Ada Evening News

Location: Ada, Oklahoma

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - December 21, 1905, Ada, Oklahoma                                ADA EVENING NEWS. ADA, XKD. TER. Solitude Is placo where they never Philadelphia Sntunla> Post. The women continue to wear their hair to suit themselves, rather than Mr. Carnegie. If "Mrs. Warren's Profession" Is too tough for New York. It must be al- mighty tough. As a small oor.eession to common sense William Waldorf Astor does not wear a monoole. Sir Frederick Troves snys sickness la n blessing. Perhaps he Intends to marry the nurse. Vsunlly when a man reaches xho fnrn in the lime he fliuls that it turns ID the wrong direction. The duke business in Russia isn't likely to be as profitable In the future as it has been in the past. That Denver mnn who has nevel been Kissed is going to disappoint some woman badly one of these days The mystery of Edwin Drood has been solved, but we are still searching for the man who struck Billy Patter- son. Stuyvesant Fish has paid one of his wites bills at last Oh. these women' T'ley always have their way sooner or later. In the glorious golden autumn love- ly woman buys a frock, and the frost Is on the vvaliet and the neighbors get a shock. A Tennessee state senator who led a raid on his son's poker came prob- ably gave the young man the surprise of his lite The American contractor is to build the Panama canal There is nothing in this world he is not ready to under- take and execute According to the new state census, the population of Greater New York is This will make Chicago feel worse than ever. A check for S75 oO has just been sisjned by the issistant secre'ary of the treas-ury, but it wasn't drawn en his personal account. Kins Alfonso traveled Incognito through Franco on his way to Ger- many That's the only way that roy- rlty can have a real pood time. Men are the real slaves of fashion, In Mrs Stuvve.-ant Fish's opinion; look at the bat-, they wear. V.'oll. look at the things called hats women wear. An eastern poet says: "The morn- Ins: light is breaking." It may be. however, that it is the cook srn.ishiru: o few cut-glass finger boA's in tht kitchen An Omaha man who lost his job at the aso of in I and then tried to com- mit suicide will be Co: think- ing that he had readied die end of his rope. William Schaus. a scientist. has Riven moth-i to th American Museum of Natural IH-tory. The com- mon practice of donating dollars did not appeal to him. A Massachusetts man has boon ap- pointed to the consulship at Yladivos- place that seems very much more attractive now than it did thieo or four months ago. A fleet may be sent to compel tho sultan to make reforms in Macedonia. In arguing with the more or less sub- lime porte there is nothing quite, so persuasive as big guns. A Island man who is 10 years old and minus a leg bestt-d his old son in a race for the affe  going over there to study the pigmies, aren't said a New York reporter. "That guess is only partially cor- Professor Starr answered, "for I nm going to study other things, too." He smileel and went em: "You remind me of n man who called at a house which the stork had just visited. "'Is It a boy or a said this man. 'Guess.' said the father. 'A tho visitor hazarded. 'You are onTy half the father answered with a sigh." Old Story Revived. A Kansas boy sat on a fence in- closing a cornfield. A city chap pass- ing by remarked: "Your corn looks kind of yeller, bub." "Yes, sir; that's the kind wo plant- answered tho lad. "It don't look like you'd havo more than half u said tho city chap. "Nopo, wo don't expect to, the landlord gets the other half." Tho stranger hesitated n moment nnd ejuletly ventured: "There Isn't much difference between you and a fool, boy." "Nope, only a little strip of said the farmer boy; and the city mar drove City Journal. Save from Sea's Perils X United States Active in Safeguarding Welfare of the Mariners. (Special Correspondence.) How "Jake" Mudgett Explained It. Tho story is told that "Jako" Mud- gott, a veteran conductor on the Sa- lem branch of the Boston Maine railroad, being sent for by tho super- intendent, went in fear and trembling to that official's office, and was con- fronted by the following question: How is It, Mr. Mudgett, that about tho same number of people ride on your trains every replied: "Well, you seo, sir, thoro are so many people who profor to ride with mo that when they cnn't come themselves they send substitutss." It Is impossible to say when, in the age of man guiding lights to prevent mariners from shipwreck first came into use. It Is claimed that Virgil had knowledge of lighthouses, and that, according to him, one waa placed on a tower of the temple of Apollo. Homer refers to lighthouses, ind the Colossus of Rhodes, erected JOO B. C., undoubtedly bore in his up- lifted hand a signal light. But the fa- mous Pharos of Alexandria, built 285 B. C., Is the first light of undoubted record. The lighthouse at Corunna, Spain, Is the oldest existing in the world. It was built in the reign of Trajan. The lighthouse 'system of this coun- try began with its commerce. The Irst lighthouse on this continent was built at the entrance to Boston har- bor, on Little Brewster island, in 1715. Of the lighthouses in the world, lighthouses and 46 light- ships are in the United States. These %ro in charge of lighthouse keep- ers, assisted by laborers and crews. The shape, size, height anel material employed in the construction of light- houses depend largely upon the loca- tion, character of the soil and the amount of money appropriated for their erection. Priir to 1840 there were only two forms of conical towers of rubble stone ma- sonry anel wooden frame towers, erected upon the roofs of the keepers' dwellings. The lighthouses of to-day are stately, sentinel-like structures and varied in of archi- tectural beauty, affording ideal health- ful abodes "far from the madding crowd" to those in charge of them. Varied Systems Used. The systems and modes of construc- tion used In building the lighthouses on our coasts anel lakes are the iron pile system, of which old Minors Ledge lighthouse w-ns an example, nnd tho Mitchell screw-pile system, used principally in southern waters, built on coral reefs, of which Thim- ble Shoal lighthouse Is a fair speci- men. The use of iron plates for build- ing lighthouses on dry foundations met with little favor in this country at first; but in later years, when the excellence of iron as a material for building purposes became known, it came Into larger use. Iron skeleton towers are used on land where the soil affords an inadequate support for light can be seen from a distance of Many Iron lighthouses have brick or stone towers. The modern light- house Illuminates by means of a pow- erful electrical or argand-burner lamp, usually reinforced by some optical ap- paratus like the Fresnel lens. The light produced may be steady, revolv- ing or intermittent, the differences be- ing produced by machinery, lenses, reflectors, etc., and enabling the ma- riner to distinguish individual lights and thus identify the part of the coast he Is near. Lights Seen Afar. The distance from which the prin- cipal lights can be seen IB only lim- Thimble Lighthouse, Hampton Roads, Virginia. ited by the horizon. They might be seen sixty, eighty or even 100 miles If sufficient elevation could be gained from which to view them. Instead of lighthouses, ships are sometimes used. These are employed where a lighthouse is necessary, but where It has not been erected because of the great difficulty or expense of such a structure. The lightship have the permanency of a lighthouse, and to insure it is a mat- ter of great difficulty. There are forty-six lighthouses of various sizes on duty in the service, of which the best known is the one at Sandy Hook. Several lightships are provided with fog signals, which are in effect loco- First-Class Light-Vessel With Steam Fog Signal. a masonry foundation, and when great cheapness is required. An interesting specimen of these1 iron skeleton struc- tures is the lighthouse on Paris island, South Carolina. It is the most econo- mical structure of Its kind. The light itself is simply a locomotive headlight in the form of a powerful parabolic re'tlector. The structure rests on six circular iron disks, anchored to a con- cre-te foundation. The light Is housed by day nnd hoisted at night to Us place by machinery. St. Augustine light bouse, Florida, Is a conical brick tower, 150 feet high, The Old Excuse. The Sparrow had just shot Cock Robin. "Mistook him for a deer while out ho explained. This wns really tho origin of tho time-honored custom. An Illustration. "Papa, what's n "If you don't stop bothering me I'm going to spank you." "But what's a "That's Post First Crdcr Lighthouse at St. Augus tine, Fla. Dud visible to the1 mariner for a long I'.islance. As It inighl be mistaken by for any of (lie other high brick the sluift is colored with rilack nnd vvhito spiral bands, giving :t. the nppearanco of a barber's pole. it has a fixed white light, varied by a white (lush ovory three minutes. Penfleld Roof lighthouse stands on a reef about two miles from land In Long Island sound, off Bridgeport har- bor, Connecticut. Its flashing red motive steam whistles of great size and power. Each lightship shows either one or two lights, each light being composed of eight reflectors. A fairly typical ex- ample of this class is the lightship at Pollock Rip, on Nautucket sound. Mass. This vessel is 120 feet long, nnd ia of 410 tons burden. She is schooner-rigged, with a lighting ap- paratus upon each nyjst supplied with eight burners and reflectors. It has been found so difficult to keep this vessel from dragging her anchors that she is now fitted with as heavy moorings as she would have If she were n battleship. In spite of her bril- liant lights and her powerful fog sig- nals, she has been repeatedly run in- to by passing vessels and damaged, ns, for that matter, have also most of the other lightships in the service. Famous Fastnet Lighthouse. The most famous lighthouse of tho world is that of Fastnet. It stands on a rugged and solitary rock, nino miles south of Crookhavon, at the ex- treme southwest corner of Ireland. It gives tho first and last greeting to tho transatlantic steamers as they pass to and from the Old World to the New. The rock is eighty feet in height, ana the lighthouse towers another seventy feet above, yet in winter gales tho Atlantic billows literally bombard the massive structure, anel have oven smashed In a portion of the lantern at the summit of the erection, the seas frequently sweeping over the? rock with tremendous force. Some two or three years ago tho stormy weather then prevailing prevented all com munlcation with the rock for many weeks, so that the store of food wns consumed, with the exception of somo flour. At lost a schooner manavod to approach sufficiently near to enable1 n small quantity of food to be dragged through tho son tn the hungry nun; and, fortunately, the next day the storih moderated, and the stores were once more replenished. Except in very calm weather the Fast net Is sur- rounded by a fringe of foam, and the only means of landing is by 11.0 aid of a fifty-eight feet in length. lEWSPAPERr NEWSPAPER!   

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