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Ada Evening News: Tuesday, February 21, 1905 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News (Newspaper) - February 21, 1905, Ada, Oklahoma                                 f  ^ NEWS  t«i i \ IS PHK NEWS  v\ HILK us news ;  i in . ■ '    i n pi M! 1 ™ ^  toe news deliverer at  loc ('EK WEEK  VOLUME I  DEVOTED TO MAKING ADA A LARGER AND MORE PROGRESSIVE CITY  ADA, INDIAN TERRITORY, TUESDAY EVENING, FEB. 21. 1905._  NUMBER 294  I Our Appreciation  ❖  $  ❖  $  **iy  Train on Erie Railroad Filled with Passengers Bound for New York Plunges Into Ditch.  - *  %£■  Knows no bounds tor past patronage. 'Today our Mr. Henley leaves for tile east, conscious of the fact that Ada and the surrounding country expects us to furnish these goodly people with all that fashion decrees, and since we champion the wants ct all the people, economy is the watch •{Sy word tor low prices. We care not whether your income is a dollar a day or ten dollars a day. w r e have V provided for your wants and ask but &  *  *  **  0/Vf PP/CP  ONE KILLED. BUT MANY INJURED.  Many I'lifAU-lanx W <-i r Hu*l»**d to Seen* of Diiantpr from Surrounding; Town* Injured Were l okt i* to .ler*«y t’ltjr on » Keller Train f ir-** fur Turned Completely liver.  Representative Campbell, of Kan* SHS, Has Another Long Conference with President Roosevelt,  TEXAS WANTS INQUIRY EXTENDED.  sp, aker of I *-\i»n lion*© ll ir«o I r^iiig I lint the l*rouo*ed ln\«‘*tic»tioii Into Standard IMI Method* Inrlode Hie lieu ii mon t I ii Id i>f Tint I    fmnplfell'R Mail  < I row ilii; ll (•,* \ v.  THIS SPACE BELONGS TO  Wash i a  [OU,  Paterson. N. J.. Feb. 21. One youu woman was kill* i ami about I" persons | live Campbell. < were injured, tifi > a of them *«>m mu nu*'  I-  21.  a reasonable compensation lor honor You may expect new goods daily at lowest possible prices.  i  Vpr  $  ❖  -$■  &  &  &  uadly, I»v j train on  ar Fairlawn, Mon ran i"i nearly a d rock ballast beauti. followed b> rolled down a 12 Pile dead girl. Miss . Ut Suffern. X. Y.. Waite w indow to see what Sin* was thrown oil’ Two oi the cars landed dri , ‘’ lessening the in ac ants.  aient from ilia nth railroad in New York said iliai ihe train which was wrecked was a corn rn liters train which ran us local from Middletown to Suffern.  from Suffern to Jersey  the derailing of a the Erie ladrone day. ' The head *  mile tin iii* tie-tore it toppled *» all tin* othei ca loot embankment (Ira* a Mathew . * leaning on* id th had happened, and crushed. in a big snow juries to their Xii official * t cis of the Et  and an * xpu Cii> Neat Fairs curs ju in pet* th*-motive remain* *1 supposc*l thai til by the br**akin~ of the car wheels Physicians wet* of the wreck ft Seven doctors w from Paterson u*  awn all live «»! track but the I oi: the rails, It * wreck was * avn .if a flange on  Ii*  Hi  on**  ♦  rift  Mi"*  v JV  Great Meeting of Students of St. Petersburg University Decide to Close School Until Fall.  SCATHINGLY DENOUNCED GOVERNMENT  MtaUeut Orator* ’-t-i the I mntiu ttiou Alluiue with Hie Spirit of Liberty— De-iiandiDK Krerdiuu of Speei-I*. t'oo-nclfDce anti th© i*res- Took frenrli Revolution a* Parallel  With burning words one of the sin* deals described the affair of .human 22. which lie said ha*! at lasyt solidified ’he interests of the liberals and ho-** of th* workingmen \rnid i storm oi cheers be announced that a * ontit.ua:iou of stud) was impossible niggle was in prog was the duty of the assembled and others turn to their homes and spread iii*- ani  mi ail directions , ny unveil iii haste I Fairlawn in an ambulance : six doc uhs were taken troni I Jersey Cliv on a special train and five went from iin* same place on another j train Others drove to the scene from , Paterson and Hackensack  Three relict train.-, were dispatched j I to the steno ol th** accident with all possible haste, one going from Jersey | City, another trom Paterson and a I third from Waldwick  PEABODY’S CONTEST.  I H til rill* of T••till* chit Clour*! Ill til* I ol-orado tlubern»torl*il t'oiit«Mt —Committee ta* l!fP**rt Mi»r*-t» I .  Si. Petersburg. Feb. 21. Th** spirit ot revolution had complot* possesion dl the great meeting of prof* ssors. sui-defats and directors of th** St. Petersburg university which assembled Mon ytsy to discuss the question of joining in the general strike inaugurated b} similar institutions in Russia and *1* -tided to close the university 'his fall. la anticipation ut possible troubl * Y^hen the meeeting broke up squadrons oi cossacks again paraded the* streets, especially the Nevsky Prospe* t and lite neighborhood of the Ka/-an < atli* t Jral. which is always a nohr for student demonstration-  It was the first joint meting <»i professors and students **\** authorised. but in view of the gravity *»f iii' situation it was hoped lh** presence of the professors, most of whom an* in complete sympathy* with the Liberal movement, would exercise* a restraining influence. The meeting was held in the auditorium of the university, a sprawling pill* of yellow buildings on Basil island. Neva hall being comparative^ *ma11 and incapable of holding one-third of the 4,000 students assembled.  J, "The auditorium was packed to suffo cation with earnest looking young men md women    and    the    doorways    and  window embrasures were flanked with students who h**ld others on their  shoulders.  It was a strange gathering Moat oi the students were poorly clad and nil wen* in    a state of    intense excitement their    very    eyes    burning    with  weal. A small rostrum in a corner was occupied by tho speakers. A bell Vflth which the student who presided tried to stop the thunders of applause with which the orators were greeted, was completely unavailing. From the outset student orators set the imagina lion of their auditors aflame wilt) the spirit of lii.„rty. unsparingly denouncing the course of the government. declaring that promises could not longer    avail    and    that the    only  satisfaction would be freedom of speech, conscience and the press, aud (hie convocation of a national assembly. The majority coupled this with a demand for ending the war. Almost every orator went back to the French revolution for parallels. Again and again was Russia declared to be on the eve of a **evolution.  win ie such a s  I ress and .-.lid it j young men t ber*  I like tli**m to r<  I iii th* province  * tat ion i Some the lid cit jug studies down  Winn Pro! Sp* ran/.i. one <*i 'Ii 1  speakers* revealed iii*' la* i that Gov Gen. Trepan hail threatened i.;h n permit Lie student who lefi his >tudi* to re-enter any oi iii* big univcrsi ties, the statemen- was re<*'.ve<j wi*  Denver. Col.. Felt testimony in forme Peabody's contest nu • moi' closed Sunday  21. Hearing of j r Gov. James ii the office of go\ evening Brief  Reprcsmta-Kansas, i In* ant bor oi I hi resolution providing fur ii ti in I •piny into ^he operations of the oil in terr sis oi the country, had an extended conference with President Roosevelt Monday regarding th** investigation. Mr. Campbell presented to the president considerable information I tearing upon i In mat I cr which lie has received sin** til** adoption of his resolution. lit* informed th** president he had re * lived from the speaker of tile house-of lh** Texas legislature a telegram urging him t*> request the president and the department of commerce aud labor to extend th** proposed inquiry to the methods of th** Standard iii th** Beaumont    fields <u Texas. He    also  iold the president that he Imu received , hundreds of tel cgm urns and letters I daily from all sections regarding the j investigation. The Standard Oil coni j Mr. Campbell informed the pres i already was preparing its *1*' j and would resist to the utmost j av* rnmont's investigation. The resumption by th* coni I ta ny of the purchase    of    Ivan is    oil. h*    said,  undoubtedly was decide* I upon in view <>i    *h*'    action    taken by    the  hous* of representatives requesting an Investigation. H would not surprise him either, he said. if tile pri*e of the crude oil should it** advanced gradual!:*    en    account    of the present  agitation Mr. Campbell assured th** president ihai neither in* nor th** people of Kansas desired thai any injustice should he done on either side ot the question.  Th** president will have a conference soon with fames R Garfield, commissioner of corporations, who will dire* ! the inquiry At that conference a general plan of m\*cedure in tho inquirx will In* mapped out rho president al-i cady has direct et! that it In* made as rigid, as thorough and as prompt as noseible  THE  RED CROSS  patty  idem I* ns* tho  the professors tried to -tem with moderate counsels, ad-* students to co hack to their ut their advice was howl-d  will l»* submitted to til** contest committee by both sides and the commit ie** is required under the rules adopted by the general assembly to pre sent its report am' recommendations on March I to I *• . Gov McDonald. ' president of th* ’im convention o!  * th** legislatnr**, by Allicit th** contest  Watch for announcement of the New Store.  I  I  will finally be i* > hi* vention Will tvceiv March 2 and will tv much tim** shall f«. m**n'  The joint conic report on i determine how lowed for argo  KRATZ TRIAL BEGUN.  After I hr©** War* l>eUv 11**- Former -I.  I oui* A*«rmblym»i* Ho©* to I ri «l At lintier. Wo.  Butler, Mo.. Feb. 21 Atter a delay of nearly three years, the trial *>t Charles Knit/, of St Ileitis, a former member of the municipal assembly of that city, has begun here in the Bates county circuit court. Knit/. i.-> charged w itll accepting a bribe while a member of th*’ municipal a an agent of the Sr  CHITWOOD,  THE TAILOR, FOR UP-TO-OATE CLOTHING, NEXT TO POSTOFFICE.  "\Y~  I urinal t'ouiplnint I tit*.!  ifahlp  lo Vt  Th** !*uv lore ^pendents who university were Bary charac ter > absolute in ‘don dents, huowinj was tillc I\ mad*  <»r rag**  ;n newspape re re admit to* I mazed at th i the meet im wit Ii which that the with government 1 hemse!ve> liabl  htire** of trear in* i oulU aint* bucatis and I)*  I n  Bant   1  ml  th**  it pick out .’Moulins ut Robbi'spit ere  :   t«» the in* on uul the ll*' st u-mditorium oi* I Mild in th*' niind’s-eye th** Mira *1 possibly <*f th*’ f it -  Washington, l’eb plaint was filed vs it I. of corporal iom * Im i Oil company and ti road company with spira* > to control  1  anil purchase of oil ('omplaint is sgti*'* Connelly and B C hers <'f t Ii*' nth l&orj Kansas Oil I*r*'ducei wa tiled by Reprc nj 11n* Third Kans i  21. Formal * oui t he < ommissioner ring th*' Standard Santa Fe Rail being in a * on he transportation in Kansas This I by William E Rawlings, mem * ommittee of th*’ association, ami ‘ntative Campbell s tiistiicl  way company. to ,x tensive f ranch ii K rat wa> arrest ’bree y*ais ago *»n bond went t*> vt raditiou * am tr«*at\ had been government throe  mbly from uburban Street rail i-ass a hill giving sin * to I hat corporation. *1 in St Units some n»i after his release M**\i* > anti his later univ aft r a .special arranged with that tin* iiersonal in-  0  PAUL W. ALLEN,  Livery’ Stable.  NKW HOUSES    NEW    BIKKtIES  Travel well.    Look    well.  Satisfactory Service (Guaranteed.  Allen Livery Barn  I*  *  '4  n  .-AS..  J  ii v  President arraignetl se* ared a  i h s.* re me* i strain * with tit** .-toldiet s | nitside ready to crush anything ’>n the muure of a street demonstration ; hat a* ii a meeting was allowed It Is I * s.'ary i*» explain. howev*T f  that ml*', th** la* once a meeting is au-hori/.ed the police cannot stop it’ un-r^s tin* university directors call them n  The speeches grew more aud more ’\* u mg An address front Italian stu-1* ms was read denouncing the tragedy if January 22, and the general tyranny >f the bureaucracy aud expressing ->inputiiy with the Russians’ aspirations for liberty. When shortly after lire*' o’clock a recess was taken th*' whole student laxly began singing th** Russian “Marseillais**.” which begins:  “You tell victims of love of your "ountry.”  A wild scene followed. The students infurled a red hag on which was written:  "Hail to the constituent assembly.  With this Mag the students began parading the auditorium and adjoining corridors.  A portrait of Ltaperer Nicholas was ii so taken down from the wall and carried in the procession.  The portrait was torn in a slight Uirmish, bul this called forth a pro-} est from the vast majority of those ircsent. who were careful to avoid »vcn tho appearance of disrespect to die emperor. Many proclamations wen* distributed  iims m,i,U M to I .noo.ooo  Cleveland O. Fell. 20.- -One million collare is th* amount lielieved to Iv securely hidden by Mrs. Cassie I.  Olmdwli k Coll* ctof «*f Customs Lea* * has so minutely -raced the operations * I the woman timing tim las: foul years that Ii*' is iii a position in know that th** item saved from her many financial transactions is $1,000,000 in i old cash, in addition to this sum, tim woman lins just as safely placed $ir*o.- J opposed th* OOO worth of jewelry,    I  Episcopal Bishop McLaren, of ;a*o. i* dead in New York cl y.  CIO  VX ill Vwk Vt Knoll rI to Krill.  Jefferson City. Mo.. Feb. 21.—Missouri is to be asked to help Kansas in the lattor's fight on th** Standard Oil company. To this end two bills which have already been passed by the Kansas legislat tin* » the purpose of curtaltng the power »,/ the oil trust arc to be introduced in tho Missouri legislature. These two bills are the maximum freight rate bill aud the bill making pipe lines common carriers  l*rmidrnt llnr|»rr Hum to urn-.  Chicago, Feb. 21.—President William R. Harper, of the Uni verity of Chicago. was taken to the Presbyterian hospital Sunday, where he will be prepared for th*’ operation to be performed • "* .rn next Wednesday. Dr. Harpe*' <d Im believed lie was the victim of cancer and that his chances | of recovery were slight.  t'lpr I.Inn ii* Common ('i<rrl©r«.  Washington. Feb. M.— 1 The board live llearst (New York) introduced a bill Monday placing pip** lines for the transportation of oil under the interstate commerce act. for regulation as “common carriers.”  j iciest taken in the east Roosevelt Kr:u wa- then lor trial in St Louis, but h inge of venue to Butler.  Immediately after tile trial began,  I tho attorneys for tin defense moved hut tho * as*' be quashed, which was overruled. The defense then submitted i a petition to tin* court asking that the i Mum t*«* compelled to furnish the de I lense with a transcript of the t* alimony taken before  : li* St Ijouis grand  :  jury which returned 'he indictment* imainst Krai  \ttorney llarv* >. arguing in support ! of tin* petition, quoted a New A«»rI ioiirt where this privilege was granted Circuit Attorney Sager «»l St. lands petition. Ho stated that there is no authority fen the «<mrt to grant the petition aud that if the minutes of the grand jury r*>om were turned over to the defense, a great many facts will become puhli* that may effect a groat many per.-ons not connected with the Kratz case. In closing, he stat***! that tin* granting of the petition would d«> the state a great in just lee  J. C. Warren,  OPTICIAN  Eves Tested Free.  I  J  “OIL TO BURN.  t»  There is none bet-to K' vo  .you tin*  And why not bure Enpionf ter.F** Auk your merchant  EUPION OIL.  —FOR SALK BY-  R. S. TOBIN, JONES & MEADERS, LITTLE BROS., W. J. BALOH, REED A JOHNSTON AND M. L TOWERS, W. C. ROLLOW.  , T MARTIN Agent Wators Pierce Oil Comp?  TROUBLE BREWING.  Ant!-Dto< rlmliiMtlnn Hill ll.nrlng S«t fur Hominy In K»iini»« l<**KUImturr l’oit-pon.d Until Friday.  « %  jQEjiai  <W\sW\ .WWVS  Topeka. Feb. 21.—The anti-discrimination bill which was si t for a hearing in the house at IO o'clock Monday. I has been carried over until Friday for j a further hearing. Th*- purpose * the j bill is to give each town and each re- i finery equal rates. Owing to the fact that the judiciary committee of the j house was not ready to report on the s anti-discrimination bill is one reason I why the hill went over and another is j that the house desires to find out what action the senate will take on their railroad bill. There is a growing feeling between the two blanches that nay result is trouble.  Hie Ada National Bank  TONN HOPE, President.    INO.    L.    B*  FRANK JONES, Cashier. ORY  Capital Stock, -    -    -  Undivided Profile, *.......  Blank* Furni*hed and Remittance*  ment cm Town Lots.  -.rtRINflER, Vie® President BAE SNEAD, Asst Cash.*  *.....$5*  '•OOO. <H  20,200. bt i  fo the Govern  ADA, CHICKASAW NATION, IND. TEK.   

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