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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: February 21, 1905 - Page 1

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Publication: Ada Evening News

Location: Ada, Oklahoma

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - February 21, 1905, Ada, Oklahoma                                lite PEH WEEK DEVOTED TO MAKING ADA A LARGER AND MORE PROGRESSIVE GITY VOLUME ADA, INDIAN TERRITORY, TUESDAY EVENING-, FEB. 21, 1905, HUMBJR 294 Our Appreciation Knows 110 bounds for past patronage. Today our Mr. Henley leaves for the east, conscious of the fact that Ada and the surrounding country expects us to furnish these goodly people with all that fashion decrees and since we champion the wants of all the people, economy is the watch word for low prices. We care not whether your income is a dollar a day or ten dollars a day, we have provided for your wants and ask but a reasonable compensation for this honor You may expect new goods daily at lowest possible prices. Great Meeting of Students of St. Petersburg University Decide to Close School Until Fall. SCATHINGLY DENOUNCED GOVERNMENT Set Uiv lumuiutitluu Allnraewlth the .Spirtt of MWrty imaadlnc Freedom of Sprccb, Con- actonce aiitl trio -Took t'crnrlt Revelation Si. Petersburg. Fob. -1. 'Tin- .spirit. et revolution had complete possession 4t the great meeting of professors, .stu- 4eots and directors ot the Si. Peters- "burg university which assembled Mot; to discuss tUe Question ot joining to the general strike inaugurated similar in Russia and de- qided to elose the university this fall. anticipation nf ixjs.sible trouble tbe meeeting broke up squadrons cossacks again, paraded the streets. especially tbe Ncvsky Prospect and ttle neighborhood of the which is always a point I'or stu- Jent demonstrations. It was the first joint nici'iini; of professors and students I-VIT ant hot- but in view of the t-nmty of ihe tJUiation it was hoped ihe presence ot CAe professors, jnost   I heir homes in the provinces and spread the agi- tal ioi'. Sonif el the professors tried 10 stem the tide- with moderate counsels, ad- vising ihe student'; n> so hack to their studies but their advice was howled down Whtu 1'rof. Sp'M'aux.i. one of the speakers., revealed lite faei that (jov. Uett. Trep.jfl' hail i hreatoiied not lu permit the student who left his studies to re-enter any of the big universi- ties, the statement was received whit veritable howl of rage. The few foreign newspapei rurre- who wei-e admitted to Ihe university were at tin- incen- diary character of the meet ing and Ihp ibsoltlle freeiloii' with which i be stu- di'lils. kuowini: that the auditorium was lilleii willi government spies, bold- ly made themselves liable to the of treason. In the mind'.s-eye could almost pick out the Mira- and Oes'.Monlins and possibly Danttn-: and Robbespierres of the fu- ture It- .seemod strange svitli tlu> soldiers lul.-iide. ready to crush anything in the nature of a MI red demonstration. 'hut .such :i meeting was allowed. It. is to explain. howevcV. t hut .udoi- the law once a meeting is au- tho police cannot stop if tin- rss ilte 'inivft'sity directors call Ihem 'I'hi- spoochetj grew more and inoru "xcititift. An address from Italian stu- Icuts was read denouncing the tragedy >t .lanuary 28, and the general tyranny >f the bureaucracy and expressing sympathy with the Russians' asplra- '.ions fur liberty. When shortly after o'clock a rnccas waa taken tho whole student. began singing the Russian which begins: "You fell victims of love of your A wild scene followed. The students unfurled a rivl flag on which was written: "Hail Lo the constituent, assembly." With this flag the students began iiurading the auditorium and adjoin- ing corridors. A portrait of Emperor Nicholas WOK ilso taken down from the wall and -nrrind in ihe procession. Tho portrait was torn in a slight iUlrmish. but MiLs called forth a prp- 'ost from ihn vast majority of those .iresent, who were careful to avoid >ven tho appearance of disrespect to the ompei'or. Many proclamations wen; distributed. Kplacopal Bishop McLaren, of tago, it In New York Chi- Train on Erie Railroad Filled with Passengers Bound for New York Plunges Into Ditcb. ONE KILLED, -BUT MANY INJURED, Matty I'lunlc'luns Were Kimlietl tu Scene of from Surrounding 'jorert Wero Tnktm to Jersey City on Relief Tnrneil Com- Over. Paiersou. N. J., Feb. youus woman was Killed and about 40 persons wero injviroil. ilfti-rn of I hem badly, by (lie derailing of a i-ominiitpr's (rain on ilie Krh> railrond nvni- Knirlnwu .Mon- tiny. The hPiul far run for nearly ti mile on ilu' ties ami rock ballast be- fore it toppled over unit, followed by all the othiM ears, rolled down a 3- lout ombanlunciit. Tlie dead iVllsf; MaUievvs, ot M. Y., Was leaning out ot ihe window to see what had happened. Sho was thrown on' and cmslnnl. Two of the cars landed iu a his snow ilri1'' lessening the in- jurlos to tlipir ants. An oflU-inl st- .ucnt from the offi- cers of Kr. rnilroad in New York said that the train which was wrecked was a i-imiumter's train which ran as local from .Middletown lo Suffern, and an express from Snffern to .lersoy City. Xtnr Kairlawn all live of the cars junipec' Hie track, hut the loco- motive remained on the rails. -It is supposed i hat the was hy the of a on one of the car whtH'Is. Physicians rushed to i he .scene of the wreck from all directions. Seven doctors wore driven in basic from Patorson to Kairlawn iu an am- bulance: 'six doctors were taken from Jersey City on n special train and five went from the same place ou another train. Others drove to the scene from Paterson and lUukensach. Three relief i rains were dispatched to the sccue of the accident with all possible haste, one going from Jersey Citv. another from Pnterson and a third from PEABODY'S CONTEST. Representative Campbell, of Kan- sas, Has Another Long Conference with President Roosevelt, TEXAS WANTS INQUIRY EXTENDED. Ucarluc of lit iirmclo (iubornatorlal mit to liroort Hnroh I. Denver. Feb. -Hearing of testimony iu former James II. i'eabody's contest for the office of gov- ernor closed Sunday evening. Briefs will ho submitted to the contest com- mittee by bo tli sides and the commit- tee is required under the rules adopt- ed hy the general assembly to pre- sent its report and recommendations on March t to l.ieui. McDonald, president of the joint convention of the legislature. h> which the contest will finally he docideii. The joint con- vention will receive I he report on March '2 and will then determine how much shull allowed for arnu- ment. Purmnl Compliiln t Kllttil. Washington, Feb. com- plaint was filed with I he commissioner of corporations chiirging the Standard Oil company and tln> Santa Fo Rail- road company with being in a con- spiracy to control the transportation run! purchase of oil in Kansas. This complaint is Binned by William K Connolly and U. f. HawlinRs. mem- bers the udvihorj commit toe of the Kansas Oil Producers' association, and was liled by Represeiuat ivo Campbell, of the Third Kansas district. f i'oxiis llouxe Wlrc-M Unglug That llin rrouosmt Into stuixl- urrt Ull lurlmlB the lieaillliont KU'.lil of Thnt Mull Urowlne llotvy. Washington, Fell. live Campbell, of Kansas. I he author ot i hi-, resolution providing for an in- (iniry into Jhe unurations of the oil in- terests of (hi? country, hail an extended conference with President Roosevelt .Monday regarding ihe investigation. Mr. Campbell presented to the presi- dent considerable information hearing upon the matter which he tins received since the adoption, of his resolution. He informed the president he had" re ceivetl from the speaker of the hottsf- of ine. Texas legislature a telegram urging him to request the president and the department, of commerce aud labor to extend the proposed inquiry to the methods of the Standard in the Beaumont fields of Texas. He also loltl the president that he had received hundreds of telegraams and letters daily from all soct'ons regarding the- investigation. The Standard Oil com- pany. Mr. Campbell informed the. pres- ident, already was preparing its de- fense and would resist to the utmost the government's investigation. The resumption by the company of tho purchase of Kansas oil. he said. undoubtedly was decided upon in view of the. aciion taken hy the house of representatives requesting an investigation. It would not sur- prise him either, he .said, it' (lit- price of the crude oil should he advanced gradually on account of the present, agitation. Mr. Campbell assured til- president that neither lie nor the peo- ple of Kansas desired that any injus- tice should bp done on either side ot Ihe question. The president will have a conference- soon, II. Garfiehl, commis- sioner of corporations, who will direct tho inquiry. At that conference a gen- eral plan of procedure in the inquiry will he mapped out. The president al- ready has directed that il be made as rigid, as thorough and as prompt as possible. KRATZ TRIAL BEGUN. After the Kormi'i- St. Amvutbljrninii tn Trlul at MIL llnx Illilllmi Wl.OOO.OOO. i Cleveland. Feb. million dollars i.s tin1 ununmi believed lo he securely hidden by Mrs. Cassic I. Cluulwick. Collector of Customs Lead' has so minutely raced the operations I of lhis woman during the last four years (hut he is in -JL position to know that the item saved from her inanj financial transactions is in i old cash. In addition to this sum, woman has just as safely placed '100 worth of jewelry. Will MUiourl to Help. Jefferson City, Mo., Feb. souri is to be asked to help Kansas in the lattec's light on the Standard Oil company. To this end two bills which have already been passed by tho Kansas legislature i the purpose of curtallng the power oi1 the oil trust are to be introduced in the Missouri legislature. These two bills are the maximum freight rate bill and the bill making pipe lines common carriers. Duller. Mo., Feb. After a delay of nearly three years, the trial of Charles Krntz, of St. Louis, a former member of the municipal assembly of that city, has begun here in the Hates county circuit court. Kratx is charged with accepting a bribe while a mem- ber of the municipal assembly, from an agent of the Suburban Street rail- way company. 10 pass a bill giving an extensive franchise to ilr.tt corporation. was arrested in Si. Louis some three years ago and after his release on bond went to Mexico and bis later extradition came only after a special treaty hud been arranged with that government through the personal in- terest (alien in the case by President. Roosevelt. was then arraigned for (rial in SI. Louis, but secured u I'hango of venue to Butler. Immediately after I he trial began, the attorneys for the defense moved i hat. the case be quashed, which was I overruled. The defense then submitted a petilioti 10 the court asking that lh< state be compelled to furnish the de- fense with a transcript, of the testimo- ny taken before the SI. Ixiuis grand jury which returned (lie intlicl tnetits against Attorney Harvey, arguing in supporl of the petition, ijuotnil a Now York court where this privilege was granted. Circuit Attorney Sager of St. Louis opposed the petition. He stated that there is no authority for the rnurt to grant the petition and (hat If the minutes of the grand jury room were turned over to the defense, a great many facts will become public that may effect a great many persons not connected with the Kratz case. In clos- ing, ho stated that the granting of the petition would do the slate a great Injustice. TROUBLE BREWING. I'rmtdent Harper linn Crencer. Chicago, Feb. William R. Harper, of the of Chi- cago, was taken to the Presbyterian hospital Sunday, where he will bo prepared for the operation to be per- formed .tn next Wednesday. Dr. Harpey ..d he believed he was tho victim of cancer and that his clmncos of recovery were slight. Pipe Common Washington, Feb. board tive Hearst (New York) Introduced a bill Monday placing lines for the transportation of oil under the inter- state commerce act, for regulation u "common Hill tlcarlne For Mandar In 1'oftt- Until KrldBjr. Topeka, Feb. anti-discrim- ination bill which was set for a hoar- Ing in the house at 10 o'clock Monday, has been carried over until Friday for a further hearing. The purpose the bill Is to give each town and each re- Hnury equal rates. Owinp to the fact that the judiciary committee of the house was not ready to report on the anti-discrimination bill is one reason why the bill went over and another is that the house desires to find out what action the senate will take on their railroad bill. There is a growing feel- Ing batween the two that my rmult trouble. THIS SPACE BELONGS TO THE RED CROSS STORE Watch for announcement of the New Store. GHITWOOD, THE TAILOR, FOR UP-TO-DATE CLOTHING, NEXT TO POSTOFFICE, PAUL W. ALLEN, Livery Stable. NEW HOUSES NEW BUGGIES Travel well. Look well. Satisfactory Service Guaranteed. Allen Livery Barn J. C. Warren, OPTICIAN Eyes Tested Free. _i OIL TO BURN. There is none bet- to jrive you tho And why not burn Enpionlf Auk your merchant EUPION OIL. FOR SALE HY R. 8. TOBIN, JONES A MEADEBB, LJTTLE BROS., W. J. BAL'GH, REED A JOHNSTON AND M. L POWERS, W. C. ROLLOW. W. T. MARTIN, WatiR Plirci Oil The Ada National Bank, JNO. L. ORV I TOM NOPE, President. FRANK JONES, Cuhier. Capital Stock, Undivided Profits, Blank. Pornhhed and ment on Town Lots. Vlw President SNEAP, Ant CuMw 000.00 to the Govern ADA, CHIOKASAW NATION, IND TEFL __ _   

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