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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: February 18, 1905 - Page 1

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Publication: Ada Evening News

Location: Ada, Oklahoma

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - February 18, 1905, Ada, Oklahoma                                I S. DEVOTED TO MAKING ADA A LARGER AND MORE PROGRESSIVE CITY VOLUME 1 ADA, INDIAN TEKBITOBY, SATURDAY EVENING, FEB. 18, 19O6. 292 Knows no bounds tor past patronage. Today our Mr. Henley.leaves for the east, conscious of the fact that Ada and the surrounding country expects us to furnish these goodly people with all that fashion decrees, and since we champion the wants of all the people, is the watch -word for low prices. We care not whether your income is a dollar a fr day or ten dollars a day, we have provided for your wants and ask but a reasonable compensation for this honor You may expect new goods daily at lowest possible prices. Statue of tbe Temperance Apostle Preeeated to the Government by tbe State of Illinois. FIRST WOMAN REPRESENTED IN HALL. 1! Kormer Commander of Second Mao- A, imriaa Army Tells of the Fail- ure to Plank tbe Japanese. KtffiOPATKItt AUTHORIZED ADVANCE. t Wiiru Kcluforcvtuenu Were to Head Help and After the All Uut Won Ordered the 'Victorious Armg to Storjr Different. St, Hett-rsburK, FVb. The arriv- al in St. Petersburg of General Grip- former commander of the sec- ond Mancburlan army, baa caused u food, deal of sensation in military cir dee. The general frankly avows that relinquished his command after the recent attempt of the Russians to tlank Field Marshal Oyania, because, aa he (iaiins, General Kuropatkln refused to Mod him help when victory- was iu Gen. GriuetibfrK's haiuiH Instead ordering hlru to withdraw. Oripcn berg will personally report on the sit- uation to ICmporor Nicholas. It l.s too early to .say whnt the result will IH> although it evident that Knroput- kin's enemies arc pushing their cam- paign against him It is only fair to Kuropatkin to fay that his friend.; t oiaim that Kuropatkin's wide uf the etory is that he only intended to a deoionstration in force aticl that Qripenhurg pressed Iho attack too far I and became too much Involved. j In an interview General Gripeji- berg said: "I am glad to give an ac- count of the battle of my army, the j telegrams I have seen being far from the truth. Kuropatkin, of course, au- thorized the advance but he imposed liie condition that it should not go be- yond Helkoutal and Sandepaa. From tfce first army corps before Heikoutai I detached a brigade which occupied Heikoutai January 25. The Japanese cut in from the south and the brigade came In for n cross-fire but held on un- til I got up another brigade to cover its retreat The Japanese were now con- cent rating oa their left DnritiK the evening of January 25 I and my tirroy were ordered under no circumstances to fall back from our positions. The morning my whole front was uu- "Early January 27 the fiercest fight iug occurred. We again held our own The road to Saudcpas. the Jnpamw point of concentration, finite cloai of the enemy. 1 (heroforo again ap- pealed to the conituHudci'-iii-chlef for reinforcements, if he had listened tn my entreaties would have, riven the iron ring of of the onomy. The Jupanesc, IxMnt; uionacixl by a strong force of Russian cavalry from the south and southwest, evidently real the danger tackling us. In des- peration January 2S I hey four limey desperately assaulted our outer posi- tions and were driven off each time in snch brilliant fashion that U does my heart srood to remember Iho gallantry of ruy braTi; c-ouiraiios. I might easi- ly have followed up these repulses by a headlong offensive Init I was tied down by the re- striction and his refusal (o mend me reinforcements. How anxiously f awaited n reply on both jjuhjoi'.ts. .lurft think of whnt viclory meant. Complete victory was in our The loss thousands of lives was not dread- ful before such u result "The reply of General Ktiropat.kiu arrived at five in the evening in the shajx: of an order to leave a small force in our positions and move up the army to his support in view of the expected Japanese advunco on (ho center. How was it possible, for the Japanr.se to attack Iho center when all thrir available forces were west? "H is impossible to describe, the. im- pression produced upon me, by the or- der. At first I was afraid to communi- cate it to my victorious army but thorn was nothing else to do. Wo retreated during the night of January 29 with tears In our eyes and bitterness in our hearts. It was than that I de- cided that my presence at the theater of war was no longer possible, and the next day I handed In a report to the commander-ln-chief, demanding my re- lief." Bmporor Mot OroldeU 8t. Petersburg. Feb. Associ ated press la in a position to announce positively that after the long consul- tation which he held Thursday at Tsarokoe-Selo with the committee of ministers headed by Its president, M. Witte, on the advisability of summon- ing a Ecmsky sobor, the oroporor ar- rived at no dollnito decision tilt) Iflrut tu t'renout Woman for a lu Stat- uary Kloquviit Adtimin of Con- Knluov. of IlltnoN, nt I'rnmintueioii NVashinsion, Feb. JS. --The preseuui- tion to the government ot n statue ol' the late Frances 10. Wlllard, the great temixrance worker anil npostle of pur- ity, by tho state of Illinois took place .'is .scheduled before crowded galleries. In his pmycr In the house Friday the i-lmplain. referring tu the exercises in- cidcnt to the acceptance of the statue sakl "that by the of her soul, the breadth ami scope of her intellec- tual attainments, the eloquence and chastity of her speech, and her unsel- tlsh devotion to the purity of the home the state and humanity, had won for herself the splendid and just enconium uncrowned queen of Purity and Kepresentative Ruiney. of Illinois, made the presentation address. In beginning his- speech, Mr. Kainey alluded to the fact that until to-day no state had contributed to statuary hall the .statue of a woman. He con tinned, in part, as follows: Whfin the act was passed which i-s- tablinhed this hall of fame, men were winning tho right, to place here upon the Held of battle, nt tho head of crushing squadrons oJ cavalry, or di- leottng the movement, of long lines ol Infantry amid the roar of cannon ami all the din of war. But iho real battle which made this a nation, one and In- divisable. wn.s fought and won after the surrender at Aptiomatox. Tho real victory was won after the green grass was growing anil the flowers were blooming upon the graves of the men who fell in this, the greatest civil war tile world ever saw. It was a vic- tory won In n battle waged by men and women of tho south, standing 'fchouttler'to shoulder with men and wo- men of the peaceful struggle to quench the fires of sectional hate and antttgonism. "It was at this time thai there out of the north a new a leader of armed a lender of unarmed women, a woman of supreme capacity, mental ami mornl and phys- ical. "Illinois to-day jirosfnts her statue, PMIulsitely carved nut of tljc whitest of Curara imirblt. to the nation ns her contribution to this urent hall of fame. i "In tho years whl  in Southeast Manchuria In the neighborhood Chnlbashchon. miirs northwest uf Ciunshu Pass, whence they intend to operate against the railrotui. A de- tuchtnoni of Russian frontier .mtarils with two suns the Jap- anese February M and defeated them The detachment. however, whilo vancingwas surrounded by two regi- ments ol Japanese cavalry, four com- panies of Infantry and n large band of Chinese bandits about 15 miles north- Vest of QunBhu Pass and lost heavily. Our-, gun WBS lost and nearly nil the PIHI iiorsen nnd n number of dinners killed. l City. Nob., Feb. 18. Arbor Jxxtge, the home of the late ,F. Sterling Morton, damaged by fire, Friday, the new pnrt of the housn being saved with difficulty Mrs. Joy Morton is iho only member of the family who is nt the now. tmiuemr Wllliwin to Hi- ni> Berlin, Feb. is.- -Kmperor William will uci.'i'pt the of doctor of laws from the I'niversity of Pennsyl- vania.. It will he conferred upon htm in absentia February nt the same time that it is upon Presi- dent Fob. After of Oov. White who demanded .senate, adopted THIS SPACE BELONGS TO THE I'o th Charleston, Vii., a severe arraignment by Senator Caldwell. his impeachment, the a resolution to investigate the govern- or and appointed a commit ton to that ,1 I'liHtinHiitxrx. Washington, Feb. The presi- dent has sent to the senate the follow- ing nominations of western postmas- ters: Indian George S. Gray, Kansas Pearl IS. Frayer, NOSH City. Missouri Philip A. Thompson, Craig: K. S. Brown. lOdiiui: Alexander T. 1 tooth. Pierce City: Sebastian Nelxcher, Pacific.; John H. Ftehor. Sullivan: Clark Urown. llmmi THE KIND OF TONIC THE PATIENT NEEDS. "The battle of January 26 was con- tinned until the evening. We did not surrender In Inch of ground. My left flank, which was clearing the road to Sandepafl, being weak, I asked the com mander-ln-chtef, who had 60 battalions available, for reinforcements. He de- clined to send any. apparently taking tbe Japanese demonstration at the eentftf u being a general advance. Nevertheless I decided to storm Hei- koutai the next day. 'All the Mrrannd- teg. were already in our baofe Ilrokn Tlivlr ritrolr. Washington, Pwh. stalo Ue partment him Invited the attontion of the Russian government to the fact that threo officers of tho trans- port Lena, who Interned at San Francisco, have broken their pa- role, and are now In St. Petersburg. Pniroluvut KocheBter, N. Y., Fob. ick Oook. former secretary of state, president of the Rochester street rail- way company president of the German- Anverlcan'banlc, and a director tn many other obrporftUoDB. and iMUtuttoios. to RED CROSS STORE Watch for announcement of the New Store. I CHITWOOD THE CLOTHING, NEXT TO POSTOFFICE. PAUL W. ALLEN, Livery Stable. NEW HOUSES NEW BUGGIE8 Travel well. Look well. Satisfactory Service Guaranteed. Allen Livery Barn J. C. Warren, OPTICIAN Eyes Tested Free. n BURN. There ia none bet- to give you tho And why not burn ter. Ask yonr merchant OIL. -------FOB SALE BY------- R. 8. TOBIN, JONES A MEADERS, LITTLE BROS., W. J. BAUGH, REED A JOHNSTON AND M. L. POWERS, W. C. ROLLOW. W, T. MARTIN, Agiit Witirs Nirci OB i The Ada National Bank. TOM HOPE, President. JNO. L. 8ARRINGER, President FRANK JONES, Cathter. ORVILLE SNEAO, Alii Cashier Capital Undivided Profita, Blanks Furnished and Remittances Made to the Govern- ment on Town Lots. ADA, CHICKASAW NATION. IND. TEB. iNEWSPAPERl   

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