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Ada Evening News: Monday, February 13, 1905 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News (Newspaper) - February 13, 1905, Ada, Oklahoma                                 r  I  t  THE HEWS  MV KS TUE NKW* WHILE n NEU -  THE ADA EVENING NEWS.     TH    [E NEWS      deli    VERKD Al      ar    'EH WEEK        .. .......——_____  j .. ......  I  i    , DEVOTED    TO    MAKING ADA A LARGER    AND MORE PROGRESSIVE CITY      VOLUME I        ADA,    INDIAN TERRITORY. MONDAY  I    EVENING, FEB. 13. 1905. NUMBER 287     #  J A FEW DAYS LONGER! *  W == -  ❖  *  ❖  ❖  *  ❖  ❖  fbi account of tho bito *>•* w c a t It c J . ic t venting vfT  it.any ' rom cornin*:  l o our *.♦*  Muslin |  V®.  Underwear ‘rf  Sale,  Another Iknftmw fire.  New York, Feb. 12.—A fire which broke out in a double apartment building in Thirty-eighth street between Eighth and Ninth avenue endangered the lites of many person!! and threatened a large amount of property in the vicinity. Tin- tire spread rapidly from the apartment, house to several crowded tenements in tho ear and scores of families were driven into the street with no time to save any of their personal belongings. The fire men were greatly hampered in fight log the blaze by insufficient water supply This fire was within a block and a half of the Casino theater, which was badly damaged bv fire earlier in the afternoon  I Ti lr ti in I »*«i ttnv*  Washington Fob IL*. The weather bureau reports show that the third general snowstorm u thin the last ten dtps has set in tai r Kansu - and Ncbrasl a  The President Addresses a Letter to Senator Collum About the Arbitration Feature.  declares it is a step backward.  Mr. IIiHWKvrlt Tit I ti kl* tilt Hit lift I ll« MOU uf th** VV..r11 " I rt-oljr” for "A*rr****n»«»nt M  W unlit lf** HU Vuonuncrmriil .Iftilmt Hi** I'rlnrlpl** of (ienml ArliltrtiUou*— '•••iiHt** ( nn*l<Irrln* th** TrMttn,  I  I  THIS SPACE BELONGS TO  Washington, HtKYvSoe.li has Senator Cullom, ©ittet* on hue  Fc.b i 2 mldremi a chairman ot ign relations  ►modem ♦ tter nr the commuting  THE  A . wiii t* t low ii ii \  VV hen vvc s:t\ these  goods a?e price.far, lesr titan  Actual Cost of Material,  to say nothing of ti e wor *, we ate not oxaggorHt rig. We promise no’ to uistapl oint you. Av t>a*i a- lie* weather has. been wc have had a cluttering diem* s-. Join til** birgtui. hunt* rs. come ut once Re im t vs >  I©*  ami the 1< M i.V'i ai ppi com poufed .in * * x t re mc middle lb 1  nearest apl lions t!it? r * ars 1^9  >wer Missouri and uppei valleys The storms, a* by eon it terabit snow am <«*ld M ap, continue in th« v Mountain region ti r ai'h to I h<* present cond! having iHiurriMi in bVbru  {an  ami  ■M  x&  on ii winter good  $  O/VP PP/CP SPOT CSS//-  ❖  $•  Society cl Russian Iron Masters Warn the President of the Committee of Ministers.  D WH un III  The Casino, Situated ai Thirty-Ninth and Broadway, Totally Destrayed.  STRIKE AT ST. PETERSBUR6 SPREA0IN6  M4 * T P£RS0,,S HA0  "ARROW ESCAPES  Official Kt-port, from Simoo*leo vhow 33 l'eri>on« Klllptl mu I SIG Injured at the K»*therln«*n Work*—<>0.000 Men oil Stnkr In Thtt Diatrtet— Men Arr Qairt and Dru-rutiurd.  LUI tau Kiuirll’, I urn pan v Vtrrr Krhrart-»uc Whrn Kin- Itrnke Oat—t’huruH Olrl* Urea mr* l'autc-Stru ktm. Oui All ».*  * aped-Our I bura* Uirl’* I.r^ Hrobrti -A Snoi>d Fire Iu snni** Vicinity.  St Petersburg, Feb. Ii:. -The Society * af Russian Iron Masters, representing $500,000,000 in cap i t a1, has m (mortal i z cd Ii. Witte, president *4 the committee * st ministers on the labor question, pointing out that the attitude of the! people is a warning “that no repressive measures will end the deeply-1 looted movement of th* Russian people."  The Iron masters further declare that normal relations I tween the workmen and tneir employ* rs are on ty possible with a system of goverr cunt bas (it on j . *i < aud with the participation «f I th * mploycrs and employes in I isl.it i in \ iality for all before the las inviolialality of domicile. the right to hold meetings and ftrike protection for work? is again? 5  Hie attacks of strikers, freedom of speech and press aud universal coin puIsory education,  The strike extended Saturday U Lessners, riel mans and a number of Other works. The men remain quiet and determined and declare they wIii j not yield tint ll they win the fight for an eight-hour day. A large number • Of troops are posted al*out the Viborg and Newaky quarters  Amiant of  s inno*l<> AfTilr,  Ijodz, Feb. 12.—The governor Iii an Interview with the correspondent of the Associated press said:  "My offieial reports from Sosnovieoj Show that ;13 persons were killed and 26 wounded, 18 of whom were seriously burt, in the conflict at the Katherine!! Iron works Thursday. The trouble be- j gan when a large body of striking min- j ens tri* <i to force the furnace men of j the iron works to put out the fire; and join the strike. The mob beearn* 1  Violent, broke down a fen e and forced an entrance into the works which were guarded by two companies of infantry. The office rs ordered the crowd to leave but they refused. Suddenly i a striker drew a large kni;w md rushed j at an officer. The soldiers then fired po the mob, which immediately fled, leaving the dead and wounded,'*  The governor added tha no other •hooting had been reported and that quiet had been restored in the city. There are JJOJOOO men on strike in the 8o8novice district.  New York Feb. ll The Casino iheater was totally destroyed tty fin Saturday. No one was hurt except im one chorus gin whose leg was broken  The Lad; Teazle company which has been playing at the Casino foi ;ome weeks is beaded by Lillian Kus-M’ll. The theater Is a large brick building tit the corn*r of Broadway and and Thirty-ninth street it was built in the eighties and was famous for a long Unit- as the bouse of the A ion son musical comedies. The auditorium iii the house is one story abov *  I hp street level and is nae Ii Isl by a winding stair case, This fact makes i' doubly fortunate that there was no audience in the house when the tire Marted.  Lillian Russell was not in the house at the time of the tire. The chorus girl hurt slipped on the .stairway on leaving th** building, fell and broke her leg. Her name is Anna Hart. Th**' mage carpenter hurt was John Teaney. He revived in the open air and was not in a serious condition.  The fire 8 tax ted iii the dressing room on the third fkxir over the stage. About 40 chorus girls Lad just left the stag** to make a change of costume for th** rehearsal of another scene. They were crowding up the narrow stairs to the dressing room when a volumrof smoke lolled down the stairway. The girls became panic stricken and ran shriek ing back to the stag** and towards th* exits. The stage manager made un ineffectual effort to calm them, The lire spread rapidly from on*- dressing room to another, communicated itself to the scenery, thence to the auditorium and inside of 20 minutes the whole interior of the theater wns on fire. All the members of the company with the except on of Miss Russell herself were t;n the stage or iii th*- dressing rooms when th* Are start***!. The theater itse.lf Is gutted. The Casino is In the heart of th** Upper Broadway section f ironist V'  1  nows na the Rialto and the i re Immediately attracted an enormous crowd The crowd filled Broadway for a block in either direction, extending from Thirty-fourth street as fa.* north u*; Fort,-second, hampering the work of thp firemen. The large number of poMcexm t who were hurried, to the aceite were unable to clear the streets  Th* prohibition federation, which lias for its object ’the complete annihilation id Ii* 1  liquor traffic,** has been organized u Shawnee Ok. One of th prim** ii.ov rs is Mrs Carrie Nation who has r<< entIv located there  STANDARD FIGHTS BACK.  in Ordt-r I > Funt«h th** *»t »t»- Ho Mnr#  of tit* K in* i« Mil Vt 111 fir  lt<»ucht  Chamite Kau l*Vb 12 The Prat rh Oil *v Gas company Oh** Kansas nam* for the Standard Oil company) potted a notice that it would purchase nu more Kan-as oil. The Kansan ('ny refinery is to g* t its supply from th* territory field aud th* Neodesha refinery is t«* ‘doit down I'ptll it doe? shut down th* territory field will sup id; the Neodesha refinery also. All the gaugers have been laid off All the tanks which are full will have to st a;. full and the Kansas* producer for the first time in the history * : the business is up "against it .:ood and strong." But tile producer is full of fight lie has not given up the struggle. There !s ii.* na,, con pix.miso la the i i, fields, Rattier it is a ludo of defiant* "The Standard must operate the pii* lines or it will forfeit its Kansas char ter." That m thi» portion which the producers ar** taking and that is the stand which they we they art* staying with anti w hich th* y are going to insist on  A statement mad* to the Star in Kansas City by John O’Brien, supefin tendent of the oil refinery at Neodesha, operated by th* Brairo Oil and Gas company (Th* 1  Standard Oil company) that the Standard Oil company has not boy tot ted the Kansas producers. Is not born* out by the situation today in the Chanute field Fvery well is idle in this district ami the plants of the Standard Oil company here, including the pumping station, is closed down. Not a barrel of oil w;is put  * based Saturday Th** Neodesha re finery is working on th* oil it has in storage and th*- Knssas (jiv refine v is drawing its st. ply from th** tank at Humboldt who* it has a tug stor age supply  .inn* < 4[ituri> in Fmlnr.n-.-  I ohio, Feb. 12. The Japanese tap-lured an **m rem** south of Chang  * hiehia on Thursday morning February J, cirl villi* off two companies of  Russian Infanta The Russians hav* continued shelling Field Mar bal Ova ina’s venter and left since Thursday bist. The Russian dead who were buried after th** battle of lleikoutai totalled 2.000.  th i the action of that committee in Mf < ad!iijj tim arbitration treaties by sa’slit ut mg Tor the word "agreement" t a word "treaty is. in his opinion, u< a step forward but a step Lu<*,v warn if th** word "treaty” is substitute! th,* treaties would amount to a spi * ific announcement against the whole principle of a general arbitration treaty. tile president also says, that it in th* judgment ot th** president, an amendment nullifies a pro-posed treaty it seems to Ii I tit that it do I* ss clearly his duty to refrain from endeavoring to .scour** a ratification of th** amend'd treaty.  Senator Cullom read the letter aloud during an executive session ot the hcu ate Friday. It wats received with a gr at deal «»t surpris* and several sen atom assert* d that th** letter »x>n firmed what they btu! claimed, namely, that the word?- “treaty" ami "agre*'  P ent, were the ♦*ss» , ntia! points. They insisted that it th** word "agreement instead of * ir*aty," Wits used it would give the president full power to negotiate agreements without submitting them to the senate.  No action w;g* taken on th** arbitr.i Hon treaties by th** senate.  The discussion in th** senate ahoweo a dotermin&tion to stand firm in regal*! to the prerogatives of the senat* '.mi to insist that the word “treaty" which is the crucial point in th** contention he'ween th* president and th**  * -enate.  .  !  he discussion which was charac-I lerlzed by expressions of the high»'s.  * regard for the president, was along I the line that the senate could not, if  it would, surrender its part of the treaty Snaking power.  Among th* senators who Kxtk this position in addition to Mr Spooner I and Mr oMrgan were Messrs Vorn-i ker and I^wlgt*  The latt**r w.ls est axially firm in sup-I»orting th* committee amendment sud insisted that wit ti all due reran! to til*- president it was for th** senate to dot crim rn its ritTits and to support its prerogatives S*nator Foraker was ne* I** ** **?: phatk In his declaration to th** same of*et  Cnu*I lertfic rr*.*lti*«  Wji.'hington Feb 12 Immediately after the close of the routine business Saturday th** senate at 12: is p. rn., on mo ion of Mr. Culkun, w**nt into exec.! iv« cession In moving th** sos si * * *1 Mr C ilium antagonized several senators who expressed ii desire t*> transact other business IF sat*! tbat it wus esp*’cla!ly desir.ibl* that th** consideration of the arbitration tr**a-tic • bo proceeded with rind expressed flu* hop* that they mi 'bt b«* tliaposed *'f Saturday if an « arty st. .*{ **ould lie ke'i ared  rn ii* wih .Inpin ^njnnl.  Washington, FVI* 12 Sci rotary Hay has signed with Mr rakahira, the Japanese minister, an arbitration treat; between the United States and Japan, id'-nti* d with those signed with  * t he other n u lo tis  REO CROSS  Watch for announcement of the New Store.  I  I  PUITU/nnn  rHE t *ilob. -for up-to-date  Ulm ll UUU, CLOTHING, NEXT TO POSTOFFICE.  r  "SY-  O  +  rn  PAUL W. ALLBN,  Livery Stable.  N KW HORSES    NEW    BUGG    I    Kb  Travel well.    I^xvk    well.  Satisfactory Service (iuaranteod.  Allen Livery Barn  I®**  teas  J. C. Warren,  OPTICIAiN  Eves Tested Free.  n  ALJ  NOW FOR SOME HEAVY SLEDDING ON TI V SENATORIAL HILL.  ft  OIL jz? TO jz? BURN.  And why not bum Euf-i* n? There is none bettor. Awk your merchant to wove you the  EUPION OIL.   FOR JSALK BY-  K. S. TOBIN, JONES A MEADERS, LITTLE BROS., W. J. BAUGH, REED A JOHNSTON AND M. L. POWERS, W. C. ROLLOW.  W. T. MARTIN, Agent Waters Pierce Oil Compan)  The Ada National Bank.  TOM HOPE, President.    JNP    l.    BlRRtbGER.    Vice    President  FRANK JONES. Cashier. ORVILLE SNEAD. Asst Cashier  Capital St<x k, - . -    .......    $50,000.00  Undivided Profits,......... *2f>,200.00  Blanks Furnished and Remittances Made to the Government on Town Lots.  ADA, CHICKASAW NATION, IND. TER.   

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