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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: January 26, 1905 - Page 1

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Location: Ada, Oklahoma

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - January 26, 1905, Ada, Oklahoma                                OLD STATEHOUSE IN BOSTON ENTRANCE TO TUNNEL STATION ANDREW BIO ESTATE How Ho Gk fied Acres at Peel In La He There are two ways "of reaching the Hermitage from by carriage the entire distance, or by train to the little station calloil Her milage, thence by conveyance or foot the remaining three miles. In either case, says a writer in Four-Track News, the way leads among the rug- ged hills of "sunny through native forests which we may easily imagine look just as they did in the latter part of eighteenth cen tury, wheii Andrew Jackson, a young man who had just completed a brief nnd very unsystematic course ol "reading placed all his worldly goods and himself on the back of his one horse and turned his face from the Carolines to the then wilderness of eastern Tennessee to make his for- tune. The land records of 1794-7 show that It was during those years that Jackson laid the foundation for the large estate he afterward owned. He was the only lawyer in that region in the early when money was scarce and land was cheap and a lawyer's fee for conducting a case of no very great importance might easily be a a square mile of land. In a few years he was the own- er of over acres, which he ac quired while cheap and held till it ad vanced In value, when ho sold part of it to enable him to cultivate and im prove the remainder. Through the lower story of the his- toric old state house in Boston, built In 1743, are the entrances to the Dev- onshire street station of the newly opened East Boston tunnel. The royal governors under the first three Georges occupied these quarters when Massachusetts bad a colonial govern- ment Here John Hancock was inau- gunited first governor of tho common- wealth in 17SO. am! the state's general court sat in this building until 1798. The city government had possession from ISoO to 1839. In recent years tho upper pait of the building has been given to the collection of the Bos- ton Historical society. Tho relics will not be disturbed. SLOWNESS OF CITY Railroad Man Proves the Trutn of Ancient Jest. A number of prominent railroad men mot at dinner in Philadelphia a few days ago. among them being Pros! .lent Vtiderwood of the Erie and John P first -vice president of the f Ov.r the cigars some jocular remarks were made on the ancient topic of the quaker cit> s de- liberate methods. Mr the ciuUels. claiming that Philadel- phia is one oE the most progressive cities in the country, and backing up h-s claim with nn imposing array or flc-ircs. Mr. Green heard him thtough nnd then upset all the that remaii-ed by savins' "1 don t see how >ou make all that out. this afternoon I went Irto a book store or. Chestnut street and found thev wore selling that book of Pastor Wagoner's. 'The Simple Life." under Uxc title of 'The Pace That Kills Saw Nothing to Laugh At. Si- Chentune; Liang Cheng. Chinese mmi-ter to the Vnlted States, clinss to the dress of his native land. Ho addressed a Philadelphia audience a few a heavy snowstorm rasing at the time. He made one concession to the inclemency of the in the shape of a pair of rub- ber U'Kgings which came down over his Chinese slices. This eccentricity of anpaiel was strikingly impressed upon Sir Chcntung's audience when at the conclusion of his address he sat ('own. folded up his speech and. calmly lifting the robe of his loriK gown, doposited tho manu- script in one of his leggings. The audience roared with laughter and the diplomat at them with an that plainly betrayed his ignorance cf the fact that he was the cause of the outburst of mirth. TABLETS IN BOSTON CHURCH Erected to the Memory of Massa- chusetts Pioneers. Six tablets have been dedicated in the Fiist Unitarian church of Boston. They aio erected to the memory of the second governor of Massachusetts, Sir Hairy Vane; Simon llradstreet. tho last governor fiom tho ranks of the original colonists, Oov. John Lev- erett. John Endlcott. governor of the Massachusetts colony, nnd Mrs. Anno 1'utchliiKm This last tablet is in- scribed as follows- "This tablet is placed hero in honor of Anno Hutch- iuson. born in Lincolnshire. England, about l.VJL'. Hecehed Into the niom- burship ot this chinch Banished from Massachusetts by decree of court, Killed by tho Indians at PeMiani. N. Y. A 'bleeder of herein s.1 'Of ready >vlt and bold spirit She was a persuasive advo- cate of the right of independent judg- ment." WILL YOU PAY THE PRICE? OP THE CHINAMAN. teamed Judge Decided He Couldn't Be Classed ae "Human." "Private" John' Allen baa a fund ol itorles illustrating the peculiar brand jf justice that used to be meted out a  merchant handed him several times the required amount, but tho Pope had to send the money Instead of bringing it. for holiness will never again leave Rome. Irish Baronetcy for Australian. Sir George Augustus Jorvols Me- redyth. who has succeeded to the Irish baronetcy of Grtcnhilla, in the Coun- ty Kildare, comes from Australia, he has filled the roles of po- lice constable and cabman. He Is the grandson of the seventh and nephew of the eighth and ninth baronets. He is now in his seventy-first year. When he arrives In Dublin ho will find the family tomb In St. Patrick's cathed- ral, of which his ancestor, tho first of the Meredyths to go to Ireland, was dean In tho reign of Queen Elizabeth. Show Martyred Presidents. The phenomenon of the marble bust of Lincoln casting dual shadows that resemble profiles of tho faces of Presidents McKlnley and Oarflekl, thus producing tho trinity of presiden- tial martyrs, is attracting tho Interest of visitors to the rotunda of the state capltol at Columbus, Ohio. Visitors' Attendant Brigadier Gen. Zieglor first noticed tho phenomenon a few days ago, and is now calling the attention of capitol visitors to it. little stretch of tho Imagination is needed to see in tho two shadows the likenesses of Garfleld and McKlnley. The shadows come from the raya of light falling from the glass roof of the towering rotunda upon the bust of Lincoln, which rests upon a piece of statuary representing the surrender of Vicks- burg. The Line on the Sand. With nnclior up. I" wnlllnR. The ships stood oft tho shore; Tin- bnnJ of bold pxpUirrra NWto faint of limit, nnd sore; out steppoil Kilm Plzuno, Tho grout conquistador! HP stepped flvo pncM slowly. imcos fiom tho bnnu; Ills Rood sword from Tiilrilo Ho boio within his hnml. And with ils point ho tiuccil them A lino upun tho stiiul! "On sldo HP the So "pake his lips. "Piiith. hunKor. hiniKhlp. also fume In Mi nil And on the othoi comUiil Ami tho ships! And coitnln ones over Tho lino, and with him stood Dentil juoinlnK, M-iinrd old lighters Of tho old Spanish But to tho lost, dlshiaitoiud, 'iho bhlps for home seemed KOOO. Bo com OR tho choice to mortals, line upon the snnd. On one sldo hnidshlp, danger, And. Imiilv. Klory stand, But few tiieie lio ei oss or case lies close nt mind. Oilcuns Tlmes-lkmocrat. you? "No one nt nil." said his victim growing unaccountably uncomfortable The little fellow looked pitying] into his face, and then sidled up to hit mother. he pleaded, "tlss him 'tos he's got no one to love him at a poor Tho young mother flushed, the mid die-aged bnch-elor frowned; but It ce talnly was unkind of the other pa: sengers to titter as they Answers, MOVING BOO THAT SPREAD DEVASTATION IN IRELAND Moving Bog Swallowing a Farmhouse. The Cloonshlevers bog, which Is be- lieved to conceal a sunken lake, burst Its bounds on Dec. 19, and has since Seen spreading devastation. The vil- lage of Cloonshievers has been practi- cally swallowed up, and the whole morass, which covers an extent of about sixteen miles, has moved at least one mile. An attempt has been made to cut through the main road so as to drain off the water, but with little suc- cess. TOSSED THEM IN BLANKETS. Students of Mornlngstde College Have Fun with Professors. Students at Morningslde college, Sioux City, Introduced an unexpected athletic number at a recent reception. They surrounded, captured and one by one tossed in a blanket six members of the faculty. Prof. Carver of the English department was easy and good-natured, but Prof. Van Horn of mathematics was once quarter back on a Johns Hopkins team and smashed the line several times, well an three noses, before he was tossed. Dr. Campbell, vice-president, and Prof. Kantlener of the Greek de- partment were easily managed. The faculty is trying to decide whether the guilty ones should be disciplined or the whole thing passed as a joke. Prof. Van Horn, who fought fifteen minutes before he could be put on the blanket, was considerably hurt, but declares he doesn't think it ought to be the occasion for disciplinary measures. he as Children's Working Hours. Important physiological experi- ments have been made in Russia to tost the endurance of school children Tho results prove that in the lower four classes study may be continued for a period not exceeding twenty- two or twenty-seven hours per week, but that excessive fatigue results from longer continuance of brain work.. This time for teaching these classes has been fixed by tho latest order of the ministry of public In- struction. It is urged, however, that this should be tho outside limit, and that no lessons should bo studied at home. Professional Boosters. Innocent Now Yorkers who happc to wander into first night pcrforr ancos sometimes have puzzling exper cnces. One of these happened nt musical show the other evening, woman warbled a commonplac ditty which left tho majority of th audience cold. But from tho rear o tho theater and tho galleries thoi camo Mich a clatter that she was com pel led to repeat the verses man) times. During all this uproar the ma jority of tho audience sat silent. the Innocent was compcllcc to ask. "Those men represent tho publish of the answered the expert pnced one. "They are trying to maki it appear that tho song has made af pnormous success. Just such a claque attends every first night of anj musical show now, and when sevcra songs by various publishers are sunf Iho din keeps tho piece going unti York Sun. PEACE IN JAPAN'S HANDS. Consumption of Bananas. In the United States bunches of the fruit are consumed each year, and the demand Is Increas- ing at the rate of 25 per cent. In Europe, although the consumption at present Is less, yet tho rate of in- crease Is quite GO per cent greater. More than 150 steamers aro now en- gaged in the collection and distribu- tion of bananas, including the new fruit boats, which have a carrying ca- pacity of bunches each. Makes Him Tired. "A man who tells me how his wife wants me to cut his hair makes me said the barber, after the cus- tomer had departed. "I want a man to tell me how ho wants his hair cut not his impressions of his wife's views." "It can't be replied his companion. "Once when I went to a house to cut a man's hair he called his wife into the room to tell me how to do it." Change In Old Periodical. A famous English county ncwspa per, the Northampton Mercury, has changed hands, the proprietors Messrs. S. S. Campion Sons, bavins sold It to a local syndicate. This is tho only paper in the kingdom which can prove unbroken publication for 1S  ther resistance to the arms of Japan can be seribusly or usefully protract- ed. There must be an end, and it were better, perhaps, that the end came in Manchuria than in St. Peters- burg or Moscow. If there is delay the end will come in the west first, and then Indeed Russia's sins will have found-her put nnd dire will be her fate. York Sun. Colored Man Great Musical Composer The small prejudice against coloi lu England is exhibited In the case of Samuel Coleridge-Taylor, a mulat to, who is hailed as "a great English and at the Leeds musical festival not long ago led an orchestra of 140 performers with an Immense chorus. Taylor married an English woman and has two children, a boy ind a girl. The latter is a blonde with blue eyes and flaxen hair. Good Work of Man of Leisure. Archduke Joseph, father-in-law of tho Due d'Ortoans, Is scarcely less emi- nent as a naturalist than Duke Theo- dore in Bavaria Is an oculist. He has just completed a great chart of med- ical plants, arranged on the system of Uic late Pastor Knelpp, for whose method he la a fervent enthusiast. The work will bo published simultaneously In flve languages, and will be illus- trated by 280 colored plates, drawn and painted from nature by Princess Margaret of Thurn and Taxis, the archduke's daughter. Polite to the End. Ono of tho most famous criminals tho old Tombs has hold in many years has just been placed in his cell. The delinquent in this case has always been friendly with the news- paper men, and when he was arrest- ed several of the reporters who had known him hastened to the Tombs, confident of obtaining an Interview. He refused to be seen, and his mes- sage to them, which is a tradition of the Tombs, was eminently character- istic: "Tell he said to warden, "that I am not in." Year'a Salmon Pack. The annual report of the flsh com jiissloner gives the total pack of salm- sn on Puget sound for the season at J39.000 cases and on the Washington jide of the Willamette with n .otal of cases on the Colum jla river. Parental Promptitude. I think I like God letter than I do papa. Mrs. Willie? "Well, papa punishes me a great teal quicker than God Weekly. Judgment Suspended. he told me that I vas the only girl he ever loved. don't Judge him too mrshly, His grandfather dieJ n a lunatic asylum. I1U Wllj" r t f icld up the Harries automobile on corner for a minute's talk. "I sa Authors In Race With Death. Gen. Lew Wallace, writing his auto- biography in ii race with death, re- minds one of others who have set themselves some task and fulfilled it in spite of seemingly unsurmountablo obstacles. There wns Grant, who fin- ished the memoirs that were to pro- vide for his wife's comfort four days before his death; Scott, who worked fourteen hours a day to free himself from debt; Heine, depending on poems to give him brief surcease from physi- cal agony, and Flnsen, the Danish pro- fessor, lying on his back and writing articles on his own diseases. Congressional Modesty. With a modesty all his own. Con- gressman "Birdie" Adams of Penn- sylvania furnished for the congres- sional directory a biography of him- self in which appears the sentence: "In the fifty-filth congress, as acting chairman of the committee on for- eign affairs, Mr. Adams reported, con- ducted through the house and had charge of, In conference with the sen- ate, the Cuban resolutions, and draft- ed, introduced, reported and passed through the house of representatives in one hour the declaration of war against Spain." Escaped Dilemma Neatly. Congressman J. Adam Bede of MIn- nesota, looks like a. Scandinavian, but Is not. Nor can he talk in their na- tive tongue to a citizen hailing from "the land of the midnight sun." There- fore he was rather embarrassed while campaigning last fall on finding him- self face to face with an audience composed almost entirly of Swedes. J Tr.ving to find a way out of the diffi- culty, he asked how many of his hear- ers were born In this country. Only two hands went up. Mr. Bede felt dizzy, but braced up and asked: "How many of you speak All hands went up. whereupon he said with great dignity: "Of course, I speak the Swedish tongue, but for to- night I shall use the English, having prepared my address in that lan- guage." Literature of Outdoors. How country life is attracting a greater number 'Of Americans every year Is shown in no clearer way than by the increase in periodicals devoted to its various phases. As to books on topics of this kind, each season brings them in greater numbers, until it seems as if the whole population must be interested in the country to the extent of buying books and periodicals on the subject. The easterner is told by one writer how to build a log cabin, and by another bow to run a duck farm on a pond. Mountain cottages, lake cottages, forest cottages, are de- scribed in a manner that makes the reader lotife to abandon the steam-heat- ed flat for a breezy country home with chinks between the logs and holes in the roof. Not His Move.. Dr. ZnUertort, the celebrated chess player, was walking in the street one day when an idea struck him with re- gard to a certain chess opening, and he began carefully to think it out with a view to playing it in his next game with equally well-known player, Mr. Stelnltz. Lost In thought, he stood'at the corner of a street for a long a policeman, sus- pecting him, went up and told him to move oh. "Beg replied the little doctor absently, looking up, "It's your move." Senator Knox's Kind Deed. When United. States Senator Phi- lander C. Knox purchased the flne farm on which he now resides at Val- ley Forge he engaged in the milk busi- ness, supplying his neighbors. Miss Frederick, daughter of Dr. Charles Frederick, who resides about a mile from the Knox farm, had been supply- ing the villages of Valley Forge, but when placed in competition with the senator's herd the customers of Mlss Frederick began to fall off.' When It came .to the ears of Senator Knox that he had as a competltop the pretty daughter of the aged country physi- cian he proceeded to dispose of bis cows, and since that time Miss Fred- erick has ban an undisputed monopoly of the milk trade of Valley Forge. Great Preacher's Poor Sermon. Thomas Beecher, some years ago, lit a lecture related concerning his broth- er, the great Henry Ward Beecher: "I went to bear my brother. preach one Sabbath morning, and Henry Invited me to dine with him. As we were walking leisurely toward his-borne, I said to him, 'Henry, there was not very much thought In your sermon this, Corning.' He playfully replied, 'That is the reason I screamed so. But, Thomas, I have just as good a right to preach a poor sermon as any otbtr man In thin world.'" INEWSPAPERif INEWSPAPERif   

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