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Zanesville Times Recorder Newspaper Archive: February 17, 1971 - Page 1

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Publication: Zanesville Times Recorder

Location: Zanesville, Ohio

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   The Times Recorder (Newspaper) - February 17, 1971, Zanesville, Ohio                        ty A.dever woman can always win an argument from a man. But a clever woman doesn't. Your -Good Morning9 Newspaper Today's Weather FOEECAST Mostly cloudy, windy and warmer with a chance of showers and passible thtmdershowers. HJgis around 50, (Details on Page 4-B) lOTTH PAGES ZA3SESVILLE, OHIO; 43701 WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 1971 TEN'CENTS South Vietnamese Drive Hinted :-SAIGON" (UHJ-rAir -Force .Gerald V. Kehrli, the; highest officer yto: be court martialed on narcotics was sentenced.. Tues-' day jail and fined; ?on Charges 'of- marijuana use.. Asks Death Ban 'COLUMBUS Sen. Oliver Ocasek, D-Akron, Tues- a proposed eon- stifritionalt amendment to; limit. deathpenalty: in'cDhio.-Ocasek has introduced the.proposal in past years with- .-oiitsuccess. Classes Resunie ..-.LIMA, Ohio (UPI) Classes resumed at Lima Senior High School .Tuesday after the school was "shut down because of-rac- ial disturbances last week. Ten policemen patroled the halls. seems to be go- tag good so said Principal Merlin Sykes. Vietnamese Miffed .SAIGON Viet- 'loffended. by: what it. considers an unfriendly attitude by France, said Tuesday it might propose that the Paris talks be moved to Southeast Asia, and that consider severing relations with Paris if the French attitude persists. Ford Sales Up DETROIT Ford Motor Co. Tuesday reported it had record sales of nearly billion in 1970 .on fewer vehicles than in the previous year and net income was nearly million below 1969. Bringing Home Bacon Gets more expensive every day, so do the budget, a favor use want ads to keep your rooms or apartments rented 'all the tithe. Rented garage apt, knotty pine living rm. kitchen. vrk. 453 _ Try a want ad today you'll be pleased how quickly .they get .results. Ph. 452-4561 rThe. .possibility of repairing ihe Monroe Street temporary use --was ruled out -by the State .High-" way Department. William -Baker, "chief of Division 5 at.Newark, told city and county officials, and .ZanesyoMe busmessmen the old is simply "worn and cost 'of repair would be-as of span" across', the Muskingum .r Baker, speaking at the -Chamber-of Commerce meeting r.porn, said the report by a private consulting engineering had disclosed the .and even some ;.of "the s wo u 1 d re q uire replacement at a cost "piro- :hibitive; for "temporary -Cambridge Job Cited "We recently had. to replace a bridge near Cambridge wlr.ch was in somewhat, similar he said. 'It was much smaller, but ended up costing Baker said he does not think bridge will be open, to travel for about three years. repeated statements made by Mm and other highway officials, earlier, that it .will take "18 months for. completion .of. plans pd: specifications. and. another' 18 months for, con- struction, "There is no way .to .get a new bridge without.'... going through these he said: time might be shortened a. few days -or; a-few weeks'' by keeping continual charge. I: JV'wiUlbe happy .any; Of; names vof -persons in; the department, .you "may contact if "you wish; this type pressure won't hurt and' you might shorten the time a >To Bay Rfght-of-Way :Baker -the highway jdepartment will start toying way -prpperty :for the new road and Bridge within nine, months. "He said the federal .government, which will par- ticipate in financing the project, insists that there be housing available for residents uproot- ed: by the .new: road. He said there is adequate housing in Zahesville and he does-aot an- ticipate that this will be a pro- blem. Egypt Favors Plan Israeli Cabinet Split Over Mideast Proposal By United Press International A formula for Middle East peace put forth 'by U.N. mediator Gunnar V. Jarring has split the Israeli cabinet, Israeli newspapers said Tues- day. Egypt already has replied favorably to the plan. According to: the newspapjer Maariv, a cabinet majority supports the stand-taken at last .Sunday's meeting to ignore Jarring's-proposals and demand Egypt declare its readiness to sign a peace treaty and grant recognition to Israel as a sovereign state. It said a-minority, led by Defense Minister Moshe Dayan, wants formal and public rejection of Jarring's proposal for Israeli withdrawal from the Egypitan Sinai as part of a settlement. Maariv said American public backing of Jarring meant Israel could hardly reject his initiative formally. It said the conviction was growing within the govern- ment that Israel would at least have: to discuss boundaries in the Jarring talks concurrently with the nature of a peace settlement. The cabinet scheduled a special meeting for Thursday to continue deliberations on how to to Jarring's move. Israel contends Jarring had no authority tOymake proposals of his own, a stand that brought disagreement from the United States. Political sources in Cairo said Egypt had formally handed a "positive- reply" to Jarring in answer to his plan. SMGON of .Laotian mercen- aries trained by the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency has moved into position to counter a Communist buildup near Se- pone, a key.; objective of the South .Vietnamese incursion into military sources said- The Communist buildup near 27 miles west of the South.i-yietoamese border, and an-even bigger assembly on reported to the .south on' the Bolovens .prompted -Laotian officials to" anticipate attacks on .major and. air fields in- the area. In Cambodia, military spokes- men said a South Vietnamese column clearing Highway 7 between Kampong Cham and Snoul swung 'northward "Tues- day into Kratie province, opening a new front in that, offensive. Military sources in Phnom Penh said the move .may be a new attempt to locate and. destroy the elusive Communist Office .for South Vietnam the Viet Cong's high- command for South Vietnamese operations. COSVN was. the prime objective of the U.S. and South Vietnamese incursion into Cambodia last year, but .the Communist nerve- center was never: located by the Allies. U.S; military- spokesmen in Phnom Penh and Saigon said a U.S. Army UH1 Huey helicopter was shot down Monday night in Kratie province, wounding one crewman on board. The entire crew was rescued, they said. The U.S. Command in Saigon also said an Air Force F4 Phantom' crashed Tuesday in Laos, both crewmen being rescued in good condition, and three, other helicopters, were lost in Laos and South Vietaam with 12 killed. Seven Americans were killed in the crash of an Army medical evacuation helicopter Monday night- near Hue in South Vietnam, and five .were killed and one listed as missing in the crash' of a CH47 helicopter in Lads. Both .crashes were due to unknown causes, spokesmen said. An Army OH6 observation helicop- ter was shot down 123 miles southwest of Saigon, but there were no'casualties reported. The command reported .the second protective' reaction strike in two days Tuesday by an Air Force F105 Thunderchief fighter-bomber agajnst ah an- tiaircraft missile site, in North Vietnam. American pilots were'flying support of South Vietnamese troops in-Laos. Correspondent Kenneth .Brad- dick at Khe Sanh Tuesday said the Communists are putting up heavy antiaircraft fire to defense of their Ho Chi Minn supply trail into Cambodia and South Vietnam. The Laotian military spokes- man, Gen. Thongphan Khocksy, said in Vientiane that a force of 16 North Vietnamese and Pathet Lao guerrilla battalions totaling men was believed to be in the area Of Lao Ngam, 75 miles south of Sepone and 35 miles northeast of the Laotian southern.; military headquarters at Pakse.. He said another force of four Communist battalions totaling troops had entered an area 40 miles west of Sepone, a key crossroads on the Ho CM Minn trail. -Staff Reporter Muakingunv County ;-e will inaugurate next .month: a 'new to ".welfare -'clients designed' to help improve and strengthen family, life of those in need and sustain family unity :in times of "-stress, .it, was reported; by Director -Ernest Parent- "'Homemaker Serv- the new service will employ three women selected from low income families and who have been affiliated at some time with .welfare program. Paid' -for by the_ federal tiie jobs will' pay -'about: per-year, J 'Homemaker Services is not a -new welfare concept. It has been successfully used in many other Ohio counties for some time, but .MusMngum County has" the; money until it .was provided the first .of the year from federal sources, Par- ent, said. f To Be Trained oThe three homeniakers will be trained and assigned by the Welfare Department-; to enter homes of needy families to help m a i.n tain, strengthen and safeguard; parents' ability to care for their children. They will give temporary help in the care of dependent, physically or mentally fll or handicapped children and adults in their Own homes when there is. no. .responsible person to -provide Parent said one prime func- the Homemaker Service is to prevent disruption of fam- ily. life and enable individuals to remain, in ..their own .homes- in an alternative to placement .in foster homes, nursing holmes or institutions. Help in Crises .Designed to help, the family -times of crises, the 'will .care for .children and handicapped, ill or elderly- .persons; plan and Kroger Loot Recovered Police Tuesday afternoon recovered between and in nori negotiable checks and government food stamps which were stolen Saturday from two Kroger store employes, it was_ reported by Detective Sgt. Richard Tracy. Tracy said the three money pouches were found along a roadway west of the city but. did not identify the. finder or j pinpoint the discovery spot. On Monday, the Kroger Company offered rewards totaling for return of the checks and stamps and- for information leading to arrest and conviction of the two men who took the pouches from Jeff Frame, 19, a checker, and Daniel Hildebrand, 21, a at the store oa Market and Seventh streets. The robbery occured on Fifth street near Main street. Killed mONTON, Ohio (UPI) -John Drummond, fronton, a city san- itation worker, killed Tues- day when hit by a city garbage truck. .prepare nutritious meals within the. family marketing and routine light housekeeping tasks, .and en- courage .and help, the family .to attain higher living standards... :Hbmemakers will be. called upon when their assistance will help reestablish a broken home which may include. .dependent children, or aged persons. In some, instances they will be required to teach home- making skills "to those who lack them, Parent said. Must Request Service Homemakers will .not do babysitting, heavy cleaning, heavy laundry .nursing care. Clients must "request the service it. will not be-thrust upon them, .Parent said. The three persons selected for the jobs several weeks training; rnduding in-. structioh :by welfare personnel, local hospitals other civic and. private organizations and institutions, he A newly organized com- mittee, -iCitizens on Sales Tax Tuesday announced it will circulate petitions calling 'for a vote Nov." 1 on the proposed per ,cent "piggyback" sales tax. ,E..d w a r d Schneider, chairman of the committee, said the committee has until Friday, March 12, to ffle the petitions with County .Auditor DonDilts. The- petitions must contain signatures of 10 per cent of the total vote at the 1970 guber- natorial election, or about names. Schneider said l COST has set a goal of valid signatures. Muskingum. County com- missioners voted last Wed- nesday to enact the tax ef- fective May 1. Schneider said volunfeers circulate the petitions can contact him at 781. Larzelere avenue. Schneider emphasized the committee is officially taking no position as to approval or rejection of the tax once it is placed on the ballot. The aim is only to put the question to voters and. let them decide, he emphasized. "The county commissioners' have made it as" hard as possible for the citizens of the county to make decisions ;that Banks Cut Interest Charges NEW YORK busi- ness borrowers, got another break on interest charges Tuesday as major banks country cut their, .prune pterest rates for the': fourth time this year. Bankers .Trust Co. led the move by cutting its rate by a quarter point to 5% per cent. Many banks in -New York and across the country 'quickly followed suit. It was the seventh, round of cuts in the prime rate, from which other business loan rates are scaled upward, since the November elections which, among other things, registered the unpopularity of high inter- est rates and tight money. The prime rate was at a record high of Wz per cent at this time last year and was 6% per cent at the start of 1971. The downtrend reflected re- duced demand for loans from major industries, many of which were hit by the 1970 recession, the result largely of government's efforts to cool down an overheated economy with tight money policies. AFL-CIO Backs Strip Mine BUI COLUMBUS The Ohio AFL CIO Tuesday en- dorsed strong control of strip mine operations and said more attention must be given to land restoration. The state labor federation en- dorsed a program submitted to" General-Assembly by the Concerned Citizens Against Strip Mining. The recommendations includ- ed: land be reclaimed to its original contour. replacement of top soil. be allowed in day- light hours only. of a new state board to pass on applications for strip mine permits and maintain a staff of inspectors to enforce- tbe law. Alaskan Governor Urges _ O ''i Gonstriiction Of Pipeline; WASHINGTON, ka Gov. William A. Egari said Monday the prosperity of his state and its people hinged on approval trans-Alaskan oil pipeline. and Indian representatives, fro'w'ever, joined conservationists in op- posing.the billon pipeline. It would carry :oil; 800 miles south from Prudnoe Bay to Valdez for shipment by tanker to the U.S. West Coast. Curfew Set In Turkey ANKARA, Turkey American authorities imposed a midnight -curfew .on .thousands of U.S. military personnel in Turkey Tuesday and posted armed guards at American military instaHations. The moves followed the kidnaping Monday of a young American airman by seven Turks whom official U.S. sources said were probably left- wing radicals who want Ameri- can forces withdrawn from Turkey. He was released later in the day. Airman 1st Class James Ray Finley, 26, of Fort Worth, Tex., underwent lengthy questioning Tuesday by Turkish and U. S. military police seeking details of his pre-dawn abduction. by' gunmen from an American compound about 10 miles west of Ankara. Finley was held for more than 16 hours, then given 15 lire {about by his abductors to take a taxi back to the compound. "Finley is very healthy and said a U.S. embas- sy spokesman. "And he is terribly pleased and happy." Finley told Turkish authori- ties he was treated well by .Ms captors, "They gave me bread, cheese, olives arid tea for Finley said. 'Interior Secretary Rogers C, B. Morton, hosting-a public hearing on the project's envir- onmental hazards, promised to weigh the value of Alaska's Arctic wilderness as .heavily, as the .potential irJches of: pe- itroleum development before .ruling on the issue. He promised "s t r i n g e n t. safe- but added: "I cannot endorse the philosophy that we a, moratorium on resource development forever m the Arctic." v Egan said oil revenue was the state's% sole hope of providing services and 'opportunities: for its. people. He' said the million Alaska got from oil lease sales in 1969 would be gone by mid-1976. "We. must have royalty oil flowing before that time orjace Egan .testified. Many of the Eskimo, Indian and Aleut; people of Alaska live on a level of poverty below that of any of our.-other Americans. We! cannot lock up aH the vast natural resources of the state of Alaska in every corner of the land, ignoring the cry of poverty, of human want, of human ignorance and disease which it is in our power to cure." But Richard second chief of Minto, an Indian village 20 miles from the pipeline site, and Charles Edwardsen Jr., executive director of the Arctic Slope Native Association which represents Alaskan Eski- mos, argued that the pipeline could ruin the trapping, hunting and fishing which supports then: people. are- rightfully theirs, and they have done this by legal Schneider said. "The commissioners were elected to-" represent the citizens, not" dictate to them. The resolutions passed by com- missioners say that the tax is the best interest of Muskingum but no one has bothered to ask the public to decide Schneider commented. Jeane Dixon Predicts New es Ohio' Seeress Jeane Dixon said here "we are to. have more tremors and more and predicted a. "catastrophe" next" ,Mss T3ixon appeared'.at -Wit- tenberg-University which is holding, a' "Week of the Oc- this week. .'T believe we 'are going to tremors and more she "There's going to be: a catas- trophe around the latter part of August." "I of .what it.is she said. "Of course it may not be in America. It may be in, some other part of the "And then I beleve we are going to get closer to solutions for the she said Mon- day night, "and where the war is concerned but that 3s still a long, way off." Almanac 12 B Comic 11 B Classified 8-9 B Crossword 12 A Deaths 4 B Editorials 4 A Financial 10 B Jeane Dixon 7 A -Ohio Report 9 A Sports Pages 6-7 B, TR-ACTION 6 A Women's Pages 2-3 B Spring'Like Weather Due Spring like weather is ex- pected to chase winter away today. Brisk southerly winds will drive showers and possibly even thundershowers into the region today, according to forecasters. The spring interlude should provide hope for those persons who are beginning to think they can't stand much more winter. A weak cold front is due to move through the area tonight, but only a slight drop in tem- peratures .is anticipated after the front passes. Today's high should be around 50, and temperatures are expected to reach into, the 40s Thursday. The overnight low was forecast to register in the upper 20s or lower 30s.. What had been a relatively miid winter suddenly turned bitter in late January. Since then, the region has had little respite from Arctic cold waves and frequent v.   

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