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Zanesville Times Recorder Newspaper Archive: July 11, 1969 - Page 1

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Publication: Zanesville Times Recorder

Location: Zanesville, Ohio

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   Times Recorder, The (Newspaper) - July 11, 1969, Zanesville, Ohio                               Good Morning WMMB nave a nay keeping a HU from reading ketweeB the toes. They call it nakeip. The Times Recorder Victor Riesel Sayt Labor Joins Ranks To Oppose Surtax Extension: Read The TR On Saturday VOL. NO. 22 PAGES ZAKESVILLE, OHIO, 43701 FRIDAY, JULY 11, 1969 TEN CENTS Ice Cream Spilled Near Creamery Road Children scamper among the ruins of lee cream and popcyclcs to salvage what they can of the special delivery MeadowgoM truck load en route from Zanesville to a Newark supermarket. The truck skidded on a curve at p.m. on Ohio 146 near (Ironically enough) Creamery road and rolled over, spilling its cargo on the highway. Frazeysbyrg firemen based tie read. Neither the driver, Robert M. Dntro, IS of 1233 Lindburg avenue, nor Us helper, Donald Lee Brown, 21, of 1124 West Musklngum avenue, was hurt. The accident happened shortly following the ll-imnute squall of rain that struck ZanesviUe in the late afternoon. They were treated and released from Good Samaritan Hospital where they were taken by Zanesvllle Ambulance Service. Health Warning Issued Nixon Proposes Broad Assault To Curb Higher Medical Costs WASHINGTON (UPI) Nixon Administration proposed a broad assault on the causes of spiraling medical costs Thursday, warning that "mono- lithic, government dominated medical care" will result if the nation cannot provide health services for everyone at a price they can.afford. A study report released by President Nixon urged joint action by the government, doctors, hospitals, medical schools and the health insur- ance industry to make the best use of overburdened resources and to stress prevention and early treatment of first line of attack." The administration promised to crack down on abuses and lax administration of the "badly conceived and badly organized" Medicaid program of federal-state health-care for the needy of all ages. It appealed at the same time for voluntary remedial steps by private institutions, which it said had too often "been reluctant to give up outmoded practices that are unstated to the incredibly rapid changes of car society, to new. demands and increased demands." The report was prepared by Secretary Kobert H.'Finch of the Department of Health, Education and Welfare and his newly appointed assistant sec- retary for health and scientific affairs, Dr. Koger 0. Egeberg. The President said at a White House briefing that he knew health care was a serious national problem when he entered office in January but after studying the report he realized the situation was "much worse than I realized." Inside Today's Times Recorder Crossroads Of Crisis The Middle East Js fast becoming a world trouble spot as clashes between Arab Republic countries and Is- raeli forces grow more numerous. A full page map, in color, of the Middle East appears on Page 12-A. You will want to keep it for future reference. Hotel On The Moon Barren 41-year-old president of the hotel chain, believes there will be hotels in outer space, perhaps soon enough for him to officiate at the formal opening of the first one. For details please turn to Page 6-B. Almanac Bridge Births Crossword Classified Comic Calendar Drew Pearson Dear Abby Deaths Earl Wilson Financial News To Helium Leak Repaired Countdown Begins To Put Man On Moon Israeli Army Post Attacked By United Press International Egyptian special forces troops stormed across the southern end of the Suez Canal Thursday night and claimed they wiped out an Israeli army post, telling and wounding 40 Israeli soldiers. Israel con- firmed the attack but said only eight of its soldiers were hit. An Egyptian. army spokes- man said in Cairo that the special forces troops held the post in the Port Tewfik area for one hour and captured an Israeli soldier. He said the company returned safely to its base after destroying five Israeli tanks and setting the Israeli post- on fire. "The (Egyptian) force stormed enemy positions till it reached their rear defenses and destroyed all enemy weapons, tanks, equipment and personnel inside their bunkers and the Egyptian spokes- man said. "It had the area under complete control for one hour and captured one enemy soldier who was wounded during the he added. The spokesman said "enemy losses are not less than 40 either killed or injured. Fiva enemy tanks were also de- stroyed and fire was set to his equipment." Ah Israeli military spokes- man said in Tel Aviv that the attack took place in the Port Tewfik area and that the Egyptians were repulsed after a short battle. The Israeli official gave no details on the number of attacking Egyptians or whether they suffered any casualties. Port Tewfifc is located near Suez City. Earlier Thursday Egypt said it crossed the canal at another point and damaged Israeli military hardware. Israel de- nied the Egyptian report. Military communiques in Cairo said Egyptian comman- dos knocked out an Israeli outpost and shot down an Israeli helicopter Thursday in a four-hour artillery duel across the canal. New fighting also flared on the Jordan and Syrian fronts. An Egyptian military spokes- man said two reinforced platoons crossed the canal in the attack on the Israeli outpost on the east bank of the waterway opposite Ismailia, blew up five bunkers and other fortifications and returned safe- ly to base three hours later. There was no mention of Israeli casualties. 2 More Dixie School Suits Filed WASHINGTON (UPI) --The Nixon administration kept up its steady legal pressure on segregated schools Thursday, filing two more suits against districts in Arkansas and Mississippi. They brought to eleven the total number of Justice Depart- ment actions in the past four days compared with just eight school suits during the entire six months since President Nixon took office. stepped up activity had been promised last Thursday when Atty. John N. Mitchell and Secretary Robert H. Finch of Health Education and Welfare issued a joint statement removing the Sep- tember school desegregation deadlines as too rigid. If that statement was calcu- lated to appease southerners, this week's unprecedented num- ber of legal attacks was clearly aimed at satisfying disgruntled liberals. Officials made no pretense of the fact several actions had been held back until'this week. The Arkansas suit Thursday attacked for the first time what appeared to be gerrymandered districts aimed at keeping schools segregated. The government sought a court order to consolidate the all-white Bright Star School District No. 6 with all Negro Milter County School District No. M as a means of abolishing the alleged discrimination. am Xelntotoi Veterans of the 3rd Battalion, Infantry, Jth Infantry Division, the first Troops of a total of ordered out of Vietnam to be returned home, are welcomed at ceremonies in Seattle, Wash. The 814 men marched in a .parade Air Base Also Bombarded through Seattle and were welcomed by -local dignataries and Secretary of the Army Stanley Rcsor. A small group of antiwar demonstrators heckled the ceremonies. Viet Cong Terrorist Attacks American Billet Near Saigon SAIGON Viet Cong terrorist bombed an American military billet and Communist gunners bombarded an air base near Saigon Thursday, prompt- ing Allied military sources to predict an increasing tempo o! attacks against the capital. The bomb wounded two American soldiers and 14 Communists Invited Into Saigon Elections SAIGON (UPI) President Nguyen Van Thieu Friday invited the Viet Cong to participate in national elections in .South Vietnam if they renounce violence and "pledge themselves to accept the results of the elections." He said it was a major initiative for peace. "The only way for the people of South Vietnam to exercise their fight of self-determination, to participate in public affairs, and to determine the future of the country, is through elec- tions in which they can genuinely express their choice, free from fear and Thieu said in a broadcast address to the nation. He said "all political parties and including the National Liberation Front (Viet could participate in elections" if they renounce violence and pledge themselves to accept the results of the elections." He called for the establish- ment of an electorial commis- sion, which would represent all political parties and groups including ttie Viet Cong, to "assure equal opportunity in the campaigning of all candi- dates." ''It v.ul also enable all political parties and groups to participate in watching the polls to see that people vote absolutely freely and in watch- ing the counting of the ballots to see that they are honestly the South Vietnamese president said. FORECAST Fair through- out Ibe state today and Satur- day with little temperature change. (See details on Page f-A) Vietnamese civilians standing outside the billet at Saigon's Tan Son Nhut Air'Base. The rocket attack against the Bien Hca Air Base, 14 miles northeast of the capital, killed seven Vietnamese civilians and wounded 15 others. Allied sources said some 300 Viet Cong commandos recently had moved into Binh Chanh district southwest of Saigon, hiding there in preparation for sabotage attacks on the capital. The sources said some of these Viet Cong already had entered Saigon, and the bombing of the billet indicated the sabotage campaign had begun. The billet attack coincided with a Viet Cong Liberation Radio broadcast Thursday urg- ing the guerrillas to increase their efforts in view of the "weakening position of the Americans and their puppets (South The com- mentary, monitored in Saigon, said Communist victories dur- ing the past six months had given the Viet Cong "a very solid base" for operations. The radio said the Viet Cong will launch "continuous at- tacks" against the Allied forces if the United States fails to modify its Vietnam policies. The bomb at the air base barracks was thrown by a lone terrorist who escaped, military sources said. The bombardment of Bien Hoa Air Base with 20 122mm rockets was rare in thai it came during daylight hours, following overnight shelling attacks against 32 other Allied installations. T- Blastoff Scheduled Wednesday CAPE KENNEDY Launch crews fixed a helium leak and then started the countdown Thursday night for the Apollo 11 blastoff next Wednesday on man's first attempt to land men on the lunar surface. The leak in the Saturn 5 rocket was the only significant hitch in the series of prepara- t-'ons for the launch of Nefl A. Armstrong, Michael Coffins and Edwin E. Aldrin, and it wai solved quickly. Two technicians climbed In- side the first stage- fuel tank and tightened a loose fitting. The long countdown began on time at 8 p.m. EDT when ,vchief test conductor read .pat from a countdown manual said: "Start on.my.mark at T- minus.J days, 21 Sours, zero minutes. 5-4-3-2-l-mark. The leak was caused by a loose nut' in the helium gas pressurization system in the booster's cavernous liquid oxy- gen tank. After it was tightened and the system retested, flie space agency announced "the problem has been resolved." The technicians, wearing super-clean white coveralls, entered the tank through a manhole at its base and climbed up on rib-like baffles along the side of the tank's inside wall to locate and repair the leak. They traced it to a loose nut on the bottom of one of four helium bottles attached to the wall of the tank, structure as tall as a six-story building and as wide as nuclear sub- marine. One of the technicians, mechanic Ira Kay Beeson, tightened the nut while the other, Walter Delle, inspected tie operation. They then left the big rocket and launch crews applied pressure to the system to make certain the teak was eliminated. Rains Soak Area Again Heavy rains soaked scattered sections of MuskingurQ County Thursday as cooler and less- humid air approached Ohio from the northwest Municipal Airport recorded 1.07 inches of rain, mostly during a morning downpour. The north side of Zanesvflle also received a hard rain during the morning, but southern sections of the city received little or no rainfall until afternoon when another shower moved through area. As much as VA inches of rainfall was measured between 8 and 11 a.m. by a resident who lives a short distance north of Municipal Airport. The cooler air is expected ta clear showers from the area by this afternoon. Although tem- peratures are likely to be a few- degree? cooler, the most- noticable difference will be in the humidity levels whici should considerably lower. EWSPAPER iEWSPAPE'RI   

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