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Zanesville Times Recorder Newspaper Archive: December 18, 1967 - Page 1

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Publication: Zanesville Times Recorder

Location: Zanesville, Ohio

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   Times Recorder, The (Newspaper) - December 18, 1967, Zanesville, Ohio                               Good Morning! It takes a wise man all Ms life to fiad oa been a fool all his life. _ Smart The Times Recorder Coining Tomorrow, A Neiv Full Color Map Of Vietnam. Get Your Copy 306 26 ZAJNESVTTJ.K OHIO, 43701, DECEMBER 18, 1967 TEN CEIVTS Jets Fly Through Missile Defenses Floating derrick brought ap part of the collapsed bridge at Point Pleasant. W. Va. Death ton stands at 10, with an estimated 80 persons OEPI Telepboto) trapped in their vehicles, when the Sflver Bridge fell into the iey waters of the Ohio River Friday night. 8 More Bodies Recovered At Bridge Disaster Site POINT PLEASANT, W. Va. divers and skilled cranemen took advan- tage of a man-made ebb in the muddy Ohio Eiver Sunday and began up victims-from the collapse of the "Sflver Bridge." Eight bodies were pulled from the water, bringing to 13 the number known dead. The bodies were in four cars and a tractor- trailer, the first vehicles the river has yielded since the 100- foot high, 1.750-foot long suspen- sion bndge gave way at dusk Friday under heavy commuter and Christmas traffic. Five victims were recovered withm hours of the tagedy. SgtrH: Virginia State Police said 40 other persons were reported missing. But State Police Commissioner T. A. Welty said the death toll eventually could go beyond SO. The divers, some wearing scuba equipment and others "hard hat" ocean gear, wrapped steel cables around the sunken cars which were then Avondale Christmas Fund The Avondale Fund will close tomorrow. The old saying, "charity begins at homer" may be the rule, bat The Times Eecorder readers have pro- duced S1.COO worth of exceptions to assure that some will not be forgotten this Christmastide. previously Mike and Molly Kethers of Toboso ......................2 Patrons of Bo's Cafe........15 McGraw-Edison Employes' Charity Fund ............56.68 Employes of Prudential In- surance Co.....................1 Kristy Lynn Dernnan........1 Dale, Garnet and Cindy Ray -.2 Janeen and Jfll KeHy and Clay Cunchigham ..1 Frazeysburg Space Flignt Stitchers 4-H Club ............5 Total hoisted out by one of the four crane-equipped derrick boats being used. Each crane is capable" of "lifting 200 tons. cnrrenfe-.- which had hampered the recovery onera- tion were reduced from six to three knots Sunday by lock closings at dams upstream on the Ohio. Allegheny and Mbnon- Eivers. But rain began to faH at mid-afternoon, raising the fear the current again would go above three knots. The recovery operation cen- tered where the river was 57 feet deep, about two feet normal pool stage. An estimat- ed 57 cars and 17 been found sub- merged in the twisted beams of the steel span. The bodies recovered Sunday were taken to a temporary morgue at the National Guard Armory near here. The 39-year-old span, known locally as the -'Sflver Bridge" because of its aluminum paint coating, connected Point Plea- sant with Kanauga, Ohio. It was last inspected in 1965 but state officials in West Virginia, which was responsible for its mainten- ance, said it had no deficiencies and the reason for the tragedy was not known. N. Viet Killed On West Pike A Covington. Ky. man re- mained in critical condition last night in Good Samaritan Hos- pital from burns suffered ia a fiery crash near Mount Sterling early Sunday that claimed the life of a companion. William Godfrey Isaacs. 24, of Covingtoa sustained second and third degree barns over 25 per cent of his body, hospital at- tendants said. Killed in the mishap was Judy Ann Klein. 22. of Cheviot road, Cincinnati, driver of the car in which Isaacs was a passenger. Also injured was Frederick J. Beam. 27, of Newark Route 7. He sustained multiple abrasions, facial cuts and internal injuries. He was listed ia fair condition at Good Samaritan. The injured were taken to the hospital ia a Clyde E. Thomp- son amublance from Duncan Falls. The Highway Patrol said the Klein car was westbound on U. S. 40 v.hen it was struck in the rear by the Beam auto, setting both of the vehicles on fire. The patrol said "Miss Klein apparently suffered a fractured skull in the crash and was trapped in the wreckage. Isaacs, his clothing ablaze, struggled out of the wreckage and -the flames were beaten out by passersby. Beam also man- aged to get free from the flaming wreckage. Falls Township volunteer fire- men fought the blaze two hours before they Drought the gasoline fed flames under control Miss Klein became the 26th traffic victim in Mnsfcingum County this year. This compares to -38 for the same period in 1966. The body was taken to Clyde E. Thompson Funeral Home in Duncan Falls and later to Vitt and Stermer Funeral Home in Cincinnati. More Snow Falls Over Southwest By United Press International The Southwest's worst au- tumn storm in decades spread more snow through the Rockies and plateau states Sunday and coated a vast area of the Plains with sleet and freezing ram. The death ton continued to mount. Driving was hazardous across a 20-state area from Arizona to Michigan. The death toH from the five day storm reached 32 with IS of the deaths in Texas. Britain Back Greek Move ATHENS United States and Britain -worked behind the scenes.Sunday for a compromise permitting King Consiantine to his Athens throne. Sources in the military regime said Constan- tine had rejected the use of force in bis abortive coup against the Greek junta. The 27-year-old fang remained in seclusion in Rome Sunday, but hopes persisted that a solution could.be worked out to bring him back to Athens and restore legitimacy to the m'llitary rulers who crushed the coup. Statements attributed to the junta Sunday seemed to be an attempt to cast the king in a favorable light and "pave the way for his return in figurehead status. Informed army sources said two generals put their large units at the king's disposal and urged him to use force last week when he moved agairst tfre junta. Constantine, according to these reports, turned the generals down, saying "I don't want bloodshed." The officers were identified as Maj. Gens. Apostolos Zalochoris and Eman- uel Kehayias. Culprit Frees 28 Nine residents of the County Dog 'Pound on Newark road, including a large St. Bernard, are headed home for the holi- days. But before you begin figuring up the bafl bonds and license tags costs, read on: Sheriff's deputies were called over the weekend to investigate an unusually large number of dogs running loose in the New- ark road area. Deputies and Dog Warden Albert Hittle of Adamsvflle, Sat- urday found someone had broken a front door lock and, once inside, had freed 28 of 33 inmates. Nineteen ,of the dogs were recaptured. Flagstaff, Ariz., the nation's snowiest city, collected another 6 inches to run its total on the ground to 54 inches. Two hundred Xavajo Indians remained stranded without shel- ter near Chinle, Ariz., where they had gone to gather pinon nuts. Most highways in northern Arizona remained closed. The Grand Canyon collected another half a foot of snow. Travelers warnings remained up in Xew Mexico, where up to 7 inches of new snow was fanned by winds up to 40 miles an hour. Las Vegas. X.M., reported its snow total reached an even 2 feet and winds were clocked at 60 miles an hour. Farmington, N.M.. goti inches of snow in one hour. Montana's mountain areas measured up to 15 inches of new snow, closing roads hi the central part of the state, where high winds whipped up ground blizzards which reduced visibfli- ty to zero. Lander, Wyo., had 7 inches of new snow. Salt Lake City, Utah, had 4 inches. Rawlins, Wyo., reported blizzard conditions high wind, snow and 11 degree temperatures. Cons Stage Terror o o Raids NearSaison SAIGON (UPI) American Jets barrelled ferough MIG end missile defenses Sunday to hit two key air bases ia the fourth dav of intense air raids against North Vietnam. Oae of the targets was Phue Yen, the main MIG base and the key to North Vietnam's air defense system, located 18 miles northwest of HanoL The other was at Kep, 38 mSes northeast of the capital. Military spokesmen said MIG fighters, which Saturday ssot down an American F4C Phantom jet their 34th victim harassed the attackers, but their were no immediate reports of any more planes shot down. North Vietnamese dispatches said nine American planes were shot Sown Sunday during strikes that included "major raid on HanoL" Hanoi Radio said MIG pilots shot down five of the American planes in "swirling air battles." A U. S. commumque_mention- ed only the raids on the two rebuild its Soviet supplied air force and antiaircraft missile defenses. The U.S. Command announced the loss of a SI miflfon F4C Phantom jet in a. dogfight with a pack of sis MIGs over Hanoi Saturday. Both Air Force crewmen aboard the supersonic Phantom were lost The U.S. Command said Wavy and Air "Force pilots Sew 132 missions Saturday, following up missions- Friday and 95 on OEEI Teiephoto) Sp-4 Ron Grove. 21, of Charles City, Calif., who's on duty at an outpost some 50 miles north of Saigon with other members of his 25th Division unit, seems to be in a "Bah, Humbug" mood about this year's Christmas. Judging from the inscription on Ms helmet, he feels certain that Christens wifl happen here." Undersea Search Ends For Australia's Holt airfield and transportation-tar- gets. There was nothing about a further raid on or near Hanoi." Guerrilla squads struck in a wide area in and around Saigon in a series of oaring terror attacks that took a heavy iolL Two Viet Cong turned a concert at Saigon University into a shooting gallery in one of .the boldest raids in months. Four students were wounded. PORTSEA, Australia Rough seas pounding Australia's treacherous southeast coast Monday morning stopped the underwater search for Prime Minister Harold Holt, 59. Military commanders in charge of a massive hunt said he may never be found. A task force of more than, men found a shoe shortly after daybreak near the place where boiling surf engulfed Holt Sunday during a swim through crashing breakers. It was the only object discovered in Sours of searching and authorities took the shoe to Holt's grieving wife in the hope she could Identify it President Johnson led the free world in stunned shock at the loss of a strong ally who had supported the United States in "Vietnam with words, deeds and fighting men. Violent surf pounding jagged reefs swept Holt under the Tasman Sea Sunday afternoon in waters known to harbor prowling sharks whfle he was swimming near his summer beach house. A team of 40 navy frogmen began scouring the ocean floor at dawn Monday. Officials ordered the divers to fiie safety of the beach at 8 aja., when rough seas made further probes impossible and hazardous. The search on the surface of the water by ships and planes and along the seashore by army troops pressed on. The search intensified at daybreak Monday and officials said there was "a very slender hope" Holt may have survived tremendous odds and reached an isolated beach. Hope dwin- dled as the hours passed, and Holt was feared lost and presumed dead. The American blitz on H. Vietnam began last. Thursday when a freakish break in the winter monsoon exposed Hanoi and Haiphong targets, jjermit- ting U.S. planes to strike in force for the first time in sis weeks and attack bridges, rail lines and MIG bases repaired during the bad weather. The air war MI had given the North Vietnamese a chance to Soviet Jet Arrives BIRMINGHAM, England first Byushin 62 jetliner of the Soviet airline Aeroflot to fly directly from Moscow to Birmingham arrived Sunday with 70 members of the Royal Shakespeare Company. The actors had toured Helsinki, Leningrad and Moscow. Saturday lit fne Yen. Vies .Marshalling Tares sis mlTes northeast of nam's main ran faculty. "U.S. communiques Sunday reported light ground action throughout most of South Vietnam. North Vietnamese troops launched heavy artillery and rocket barrages into U.S- Marine outposts just south of the BMZ Saturday night American commanders said the may signal an end to a two-month MI in the border war. SHOPPING DAYS LEFT CHRISTMAS SEALS cfoer 8ESPJBATQBY DISEASES The World This Morning 0 Pirn 0 Equals 0 That's exactly what's been accomplished over the week- end to solve the emergency ambulance crisis in parts of rural Muskbigmn County. Let's have some action. Global Vietcs SAIGON About 50 militant Buddhists meet to demand the release of fellow Buddhists arrested during the uprising against the South Vietnamese government last year. (Page 5- A) LONDON The Soviet and French press say American assurances of determination to defend the dollar would not halt the present massive inter- national runs on gold. (Page 5- i A) The Nation WASHINGTON A House sub- committee reports that there are enough National Guardsmen to cope with riots but that they lack adequate equipment and advanced training. (Page 2-A) WASHINGTON Sea -going Soviet eavesdroppers are gathering vast amounts of, in- formation in preparation for development of a formidable deep-sea navy. (Page 2-A) Around Ohio COLUMBUS Two legislative committees are to start gather- ing information on which to base a plan to revise boundaries of 0 n i o's 24 congressional districts, one of the priority matters coming up before the General Assembly Jan. 15. (Page 10-B) COLUMBUS Sixteen traffic deaths Saturday after no fatalities Friday night sends Ohio's weekend toll soaring. (Page 10-B) Sportscope LOS ANGELES The Los Angeles Rams, with a powerful defensive charge pressuring Johnny Unitas, and the Balti- more Colts their first loss of the season 35-10 to take tae NFL Coastal DMsion title. (Page 4-B) PHILADELPHIA numerous key players resting on the bench, the Cleveland Browns drop a 28-24 decision to the Philadelphia Eagles. (Page 4-B) The Weather FORECAST Cloudy and warmer with intermittent rain today and tonight. (See details on page 6-B) Inside The TR Page See. Births ...................1 B Classified Ads.......11-1S E Comic Page 8-9 B Deaths, Funerals.........6 B Editorial Page..........4 Farm Page .........'....8 A Radio-TV News........12 B Sports .................4-5 B Under 20 ...............18 A Women's News........2-3 B 1EWSP4PERS   

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