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Zanesville Times Recorder Newspaper Archive: May 4, 1949 - Page 1

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Publication: Zanesville Times Recorder

Location: Zanesville, Ohio

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   The Times Recorder (Newspaper) - May 4, 1949, Zanesville, Ohio                        The Overwhelming Choice of All RFD Readers Who Intitt on. Getting Today's Today. The Times Record Hear Our Fire-Star Fincrf World and Local Newt Every Evening at 11 (WH1Z-1240) 65TH 106 Ourtcr Member et AuocUttd ZANESVILLE, OfflO, WEDNESDAY, MAY WEATHER: HOT AND HUMID HOUSE PASSES COALITION-LABOR BILL China Reds Claim Additional Gains Communists Win Victory In Battle For Important Stronghold Of Kwangteh One Of Last Nationalist Points Remaining In Northern China Has Surrendered; Another Endangered SHANGHAI, May press dispatch said today that Chinese Communist patrols had appeared before Hang- chow, the east coast port 100 miles southwest of Shanghai. The report appeared in the newspaper Sm Wan Pap. An attempt to reach Hangchow by order." Meanwhile, the Communist radio broadcast a claim that Red troops had captured Kwangteh, which is about hajf way from Wuhu on the Yangtze to Hangchow. (Wuhu was one of the major Red crossing points. It is 75 miles south- west of Nanking. Kwangteh is 114 miles inland from Wuhu.) The radio also asserted that Angry Landlords Criticize New Rent Formula Rivals For W. C. Fields Estate New York Tenants Call For Fight Against Boosts NEW YORK, May of landlords and ten- ants of the nation's largest city turned out in angry con- fusion today to criticize the government's new rent ceiling for- mula. Housing Expediter. Tighe Woods, who announced the formula last night to provide owners with a "fair net operating Income." came here and stepped personally Into a hotbed of Tenant spokesmen called for a citv-wide rent strike and a fight to "the last ditch" against rent in- creases. Landlords assailed the formula as giving Inadequate relief to hard- pressed property owners. The formula is intended to pro- duce a "net operating income' of 25 to 30 per cent of gross income on some 14 million dwelling units throughout the nation still under federal rent control. Thousands of landlords flocked to federal offices here today to apply for approval of rent In- creases. Other hundreds crammed mldtown auditorium to hear Woods explain the tions. new regula- As Woods expressed belief both landlords and tenants would be happier under the new formula, a surprised murmur of laughter which over- hall. Police JL IlC Communist troops had won a vic- tory in a battle in the Kaingsu- Cheklang Anhwei province border area about 110 miles west of Shanghai. It said "enemies- were captured. This dispatch came through censorship and gave no details. From the Jow estimate of captives it appeared to refer to a new en- gagement. The dispatch, along with the one dealing with Hangchow, showed evidence that sentences or phrases had been deleted. A Communist broadcast from Peiping heard in San Francisco made no mention of a new battle however. It reported the capture of Kwangteh and 11 other towns stretching from the Soochow front to the Yangtze. (One broadcast item Nationalist troops were captured In the "great annihilation campaign in the Nanking Shanghai Hang- chow triangle. It said th.s battle nded April 29. (The radio had announced pre- that eight Nationalist arm- es had been "wiped out" and four rthers routed on this front.) The Communist radio reported hat Tatung, one of the last Na- ionalist islands left in North surrendered May 1. Tatung is 180 miles west of Peiping. Red broadcast heard in San Francisco said the Communists had aunched an attack to knock out another Nationalist island. It is Anyang, 525 air miles northwest >f Shanghai.r Meanwhile, a U. S. Navy spokes- man said U. S.. British and French School Aid Amendment Defeated swept the audience flowed the 869-seat reported several hundred persons were turned away at the doors. Woods dashed from this meet- ing, where he answered some 50 questions, to a conference with Mayor William O'Dwyer at citv hall. Jleanwhlle.Rep. Vito Marcan- lonio. chairman of the American Labor party, called the new for- mula a "Democratic party betray- er of the people. He said he would advise tenant iroups to prepare for a city-wide rent strike "to meet the real estate Other groups also were bitterly Paul Ross, head of the New fork Tenant Council, called the icw formula "scandalous" and said t "guarantees no risk and sky- scraper profits to large realty, in- .urancc and banking syndicates. On the other side of the fence. 4cnry Winters, executive secre- ary ol the Bronx Borough Tax- wyers league, said the new order Zanesville ManNamed Opens New Methodist Church Board jFor Estate Of Rev. William A. Rush, son of Mrs. W. M. Rush of 321 Oak street, Zanesville, executive vice president of Adrian college, Adrian, Mich., has been chosen to head the new department offinance of the division of educational institutions, general board of education of the Metho- dist church. Dr. John O. Gross, executive secretary of the division, announced. The appointment is ef- ddiu w. naval vessels had left Shanghais waterfront because of a reported Communist plot to block their passage to the sea. Woman Prisoner Hangs Self ASHTABULA. O., May 3-WV-A 22-year-old woman arrested today on a disorderly conduct charge hanged herself In city jail. Police said they found her dead In a sitting position on the floor of her cell, a" towel knotted around her neck and tied to a doorknob. She was identified as Mrs.Marth: Therrion. but had been registered at a hotel as Martha Whltaker. Po- lice said she had lived here six months. Film Comedian Hurt In LOS ANGELES. May ective at once. This new department 'will iserve as a consultant to institutions of related to the In their efforts REV. W. A. RCSH higher education Methodist church to secure adequate support for maintenance and operation, accord- Ing to Dr. Gross. It will make studies of various methods success- fully employed in financing Institu- tions of higher learning both for current and capital needs, he said. It will collaborate with the divi- sion's department of public rela- tions in the preparation of litera- ture for financial campaigns. Rev. Rush has been executive vice-president of Adrian college since February 1, 1948. He Joined the staff there as alumni secretary and director of public relations. In 1940 he was appointed dean-regis- trar and work-coordinator of the student self-help plan, moving to the executive vice-presidency from 80-page deposition in support of William Rexford Fields Morris- contest of the will of movie comedian W. C. Fields was read into the record today as the fight for the estate started. The deposition, taken from Mrs. Rose'Holden Passaic, N. J., who reared-. Morris from infancy through high fchool days was Plan To Bar Segregation Snowed Under WASHINGTON, May senate today snow ed under an attempt to write an anti-segregation amend- ment into a chool aid bill. By a vote of 65 to 16, it rejected proposal by Senator Lodge (R- Hass) to bar distribution of any of the federal funds to states vhose public elementary and sec- indary schools are not open to pupils "without regard to race, :olor, creed or national origin. Fifteen Republicans voted with Lodge for his amendment. It was opposed by 48 Democrats and 17 Republicans. Opponents of the amendment said it was an effort to kill the bill- that southern senators would be united against any measure that would make the price of aid the abolishment of the south's separate school system 'or white and Negro children. Lodge denied he was trying to kill the bill. He said that "federal aid to education must not mean federal aid to segregation, and that is what will happen if we use the federal dollar as this bill con- templates." Northern Democrats and Repub- licans led the fight against Lodge s amendment while the southerners for the most part, kept out of the argument. Senator Humphrey (D-Minn) ne of the foremost advocates 01 'resident Truman's "Civil Rights rogram, opposed the amendment "As much as I detest segregation love education he said ddlng that he thought the federa government, ought to spend at least a year on the schools It was the second defeat In two ays for Lodge. By a vote of 68 to 1 the senate .yesterday turne rovides for an "unfair LQJJUON. May 3 Danny income and that prop- film and state >ra owners throughout the na- ion should rise in protest." 4rmy Selects Cemetery Site Kayc, American film and stage comedian, suffered bruises today when his automobile was in colll- n7vcd U S. military commander in Germany May 15 at his own re- quest. Truman, making the announcement today, said CSay de- serves the thanks of the American Methodist church-Rev. Rush served as pastor of the Congregational church In Morencl, Michigan from 1937 to 1947. and the Methodist church of Clayton. Mich, until June 1948 in addition to his college work. A, native of Zanesville. Rev.. Rush .graduated from Adrian college in 1932 with the A.B. degree. In 1933 he received the M.A. degree from Ohio State university, and in 1935 the S. T. B. degree from Vest- minster Theological Seminary m Clay Gives Up Post In Germany May 3 W} Ctajr'wIU be re- Sraduated from Adrian.col ege in read to Superior Judge William R. McKay. Present for the legal contest of the will were Fields' widow. Har- riet who was left 510.000 but claims under California community. property 1 a w; w. Claude Jr.. her son, who also was left Carlotta Monti, dancer who was bequeath- ed the income from and a brother and sister, Walter Fields and Adele Smith. Mrs. Holden's deposition states that Morris. 31-year-old Dallas Air- lines employe. Is the son of Fields and Bessie Poolc, ZiegfeW rtnncer and vaudeville partner of tne comedian. A collection of 17 letters which Morris claims were sent to his mother by Fields, including checks for his support mailed to Mrs. Holden. were entered into the court record. serves people for his ewcutlon of "one of the touehestiJWks and accomplish- ments of American history." wnen nis nKUV> vt sion with another car at Ayot St. Today's development opens tne iway for the appointment of Kayc paid a visit to George dern- first civilian commissioner today reported w eight miles north o: Lancaster. >hio. on U. S. route 33. for a iroposed national military ceme- Brehm   announced had notified him this site w ard Shaw and was returning to London for a stage performance when the accident occurred. Back London the comedian went on with his show, hurryinp a hospl- Westminster. Maryland. He holCs membership in seyeral educational organizations, and is also a member of the Sigma Alpha fraternity and the Adrian club. In Adrian he has president of the Commu- ermany. j'nity fund board, president of Ad- day has been in Germany clnb. president of militar overnor and gov- and deputy military governor and gov cmor since 1946. he had invited told newsmen iCharge Woman Chained To Bed ra Associatlon of and Admissions president of Parent Teachers association. AAA Citation Zanesville showed a de- crease in the number of pedestrian during I94a the city has been given a special citation In the American Automobile 10th annual pedestrian protection contest.' Cleveland placed second in the' class for D. C. bc- -hild. Under the formula proposed in he bill, the payments would range rom to slightly over pe pupil, with the biggest per capita >ayments going to the states with he lowest Income. The theory o the bill is to more nearly equallz educational opportunities. State Rests In Bribe Trial COLUMBUS. O., May 3 The state rested its case toda against A. E. Oppenheimer an Hugh H. Ruel on charges they sc llcited bribes from a liquor perm applicant. Defense attorneys prompt! moved for a directed acqultta but were turned down by Judg Cecil J. Randall. Oppenheimer. former state nq uor department chief permit ex aminer. and Ruel. Pprtsmouth Re- publican leader, will start their de- tente tomorrow. Gilbert Shively. London. O., ho- tel owner, who testified he was asked to pay bribes in order to obtain a night club license for his hotel, was called back to the wit- ness stand today for cross exam- ination. Shively previously had ie Final passage of the Wood Dm as delayed by Rep. Marcantonlo Just as the final vote was reach d. he demanded that an engrossed ony on the bill be read. This re uest can be made If any amend ments have been adopted. Engrossment is a special printm roccss, which prints the legisla ion. as amended. In Its form n the case of a bulky as th Wood measure Is, it means a deia least overnight: The Wood bill would 'repea he Taft-Hartley law on paper, bu re-enact most of its importan (Turn to Page 8, Russians Make No Move To End Berlin Blockade NEW YORK. May 3-WH-En voys .of the U. S.. Britain and France sat In their offices all day today apparently waiting for Rus- sia to make the next move toward lifting the Berlin blockade. It was understood that the most recent step In the top secret talks here was the delivery of a joint western power declaration to so- viet Deputy Foreign Minister Ja- kob A. Malik. The statement pre- sumably was drafted following yes- terday's conference attended by Dr. Philip C. Jessup. U. S. am- bassador-at-large: Sir Alexander Cadogan of Britain and Jean Chau- vel of France. The next step, diplomatic in- ,oSantS Is for Malik to notify the western whether he is prepared to confer with them again on the basis of their joint declarations. Malik attended a committee meeting at Lake Success this morning and then returned completed passage of a bill to help cities solve their down- own parking problems. The house-approved measure re- moves the present requirement hat parking lot developments must be sold to private business within two years. Under the bill, cities can con- demn and buy land for perking ois-wllh tax money or by Issuing wnds. They can then develop and operate parking lots or garages, or they can sell or lease them to private operators within 10 years. The senate also approved pay- ment of War II bonuses to dis- abled 
                            

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