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Zanesville Times Recorder Newspaper Archive: December 30, 1948 - Page 1

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Publication: Zanesville Times Recorder

Location: Zanesville, Ohio

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   Times Recorder, The (Newspaper) - December 30, 1948, Zanesville, Ohio                               The Times Recorder 64TH 8U Ckwtof ft ZANESVILLE, OHIO, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 90, IMS WKATHEKi CLOUDY, OOLDE8 FIVE CENTO BRITISH CHARGE JEWS EGYPT Netherlands Sets Date For Calling Halt To Fighting In Indonesia Dutch Attitude Interpreted As Defiance Of United Nations' Ultimatum To Stop War At Once PARIS, Dec. Netherlands told the United Nations Security Council today it would stop fighting in Java by midnight, New Years' eve, and in Sumatra two or or three days later. Several delegates, including Philip C. Jessup of the United States, immediately inter- Truman's Plane Lands Safely After Fog Causes Long Delaif Chinese Military Leaders Called To Nanking Meet Chiang Kai-Shek Seeks Advice On Conduct Of War NANKING, Dec. China's highest military com- manders were summoned to Nanking by Chiang Kai-Shek j today, probably to settle the issue of whether to fight on or sue for peace with the Commun- Friends On Edge As Ship Circles Capital Airport President Reads And Sleeps As Crowd Worries WASHINGTON, Dec. gate Jan Van Royen replied to President Truman was preted the Dutch action as de- fiance of the United Nations. The statement of Dutch Dele yesterday's security council order giving the Dutch 24 hours to re- lease Indonesian Republican lead- ers, and calling on a consular com- mission in Batavia to report on The Netherlands' compliance with the Christmas eve order -for a cease-fire In Indonesia Replying to the council's de- Mr- Truman stepped jauntily down mand for immediate release ofjand grinned as newsmen asked Indonesian Republican leaders, j whether he had been worried up ncluding President Soekarno and cairn but his friends were on his plane circled through fog and driz- zling rain above National Airport for more than 40 minutes. When the White House plane, the landed safely, Premier Mohamed Hatta, Van Hoyen said trley would be freed if they promised not to endanger "public security." Van Royen's answer was given just an hour after the 24-hour ists. There were those two hints that after a meeting tomorrow the de- cision may be to fight on against Several delegates charged in speeches that the Dutch in both replies refused to comply with the council's orders, but no specific action was taken or attempted. Syria's delegate, Faris El Khourl said it Holland had asked seemingly hopeless odds: her generals "how soon do you Chiang has called in his gen-1 gave their reply as the date for erals to try to rally their fighting j the end of operations against the spiriU 2. Gen. Chen Cheng was told to take over from civilian Wei Tao- "Oh, my goodness, Mr. Tru- man chuckled. "I've been reading and sleeping most of the time." His associates on the ground, however, were more than a little worried. Cabinet members, govern- ment officials, reporters and others stared anxiously through the dense curtain of mist as the "Indepen- due at p. m., E. S. T droned through the .soupy skies. In the tense 44 minutes before the plane's wheels met the run- way, a crossfire of radio conversa- Heavy Trucks Involved In Accidents Prussian Delegate Jacob A. Malik termed the Dutch reply "a cynical request by the aggressor for two or three days more to kill off its control tower. The fog was so thick that, other planes, waiting for the signal to land, could be heard thundering low over buildings in downtown Washington. India's M. J. Dcsai charged. Th Netherlands "in the clearest terms had rejected all that the-'- council ordered. He said the reply came on "the very hour" it should have nn- Holland was Van Royen's reply did not show compliance. Although it was unsatisfactory, he added, an (Turn to Page 2, Please) Even when the presidential DC-6 ,J started taxiing to the terminal, the! crowd of some 100 persons could not make It out through the murk. ming the governorship of Formosa island province being con- verted into a fortress off the south- j east coast ,of the Chinese mainland. The appointment of a military man to replace a civilian nt the head of-the government of.JTor- mbsa seemed to indicate that resis- tance would continue, at least in the south. Formosa already is filling with Chinese officials, civilian and mili- tary. Navy headquarters lias been transferred there. Air force units hnve been flying there as the Com- munists drive them from their mainland bases. On the side of possible peace overtures were two factors: 1. P.eliable reports say Vice- President Li Tsung-Jen will attend the military conference. He is mentioned as becoming president for negotiations with the Reds, if Chiang steps down. 2, Gen Chang Chili-Chung, one of the few high Chinese not on the Communist "war criminal" list, will attend. He is a moderate often mentioned in peace rumors. He commands Chiang's headquarters in North-west China, far from the scene of the civil war fighting. i One source described the Persons the program. darken as the fog closed down, uled military meeting as a "roll broad expansion was pro- call" of the generals to determine the feasibility of continuing the civil war. There was little news from the dormant fighting fronts. A spokesman for the Nanking garrison said a "Communist un- derground" had been found operat- ing only two miles outside the capital. He gave no details except to say the underground was being "curbed." quate" and announced he will of- fer a bill to double the minimum benefits and to bring Then the blue-and-sllver' ship ap- peared, and Mr. Truman emerged smiling and carrying several books under his arm. He said he'd been rending and drowsing while the waited its turn behind three earlier; commercial flights to come down! through the rain and fog. "We've been worried down a reporter said. said Mr. Truman, with aj grin of feigned surprise, "is that so? I've been asleep up there." The "Independence" had report-i ed it was flying over Washington's birthplace at Mt. Vernon, Va., 12 miles south of Washington Nation- al Airport, at p. m. It was then cruising at feet alti- tude. Airport officials assured news- men that despite a mistswirled "broken landing conditions Social Security Benefit Hike Gets Backing WASHINGTON, Dec. prominent Republican agreed with President Truman today that pres- t.i v vj j. LUI.; ut ent old age insurance is made- were safe." Neverthe-'Faye Emerson Roosevelt, actress UN Security Council Orders New Cease-Fire For War In Palestine No Prospect Of Immediate Armed Intervention By Britain Under. Terms Of Mutual Defense Treaty PARIS, Dec. 29 The United Nations Security Council ordered another cease-fire in Palestine today after the British delegate charged that Israeli forces attacked a town in Egypt. The British foreign office in London said it had no indlcating a full-scale Israeli invasion of Egypt, and said It rec- ognized (.hat a patrol might have crossed the border in error. Thf foreign office said .there was no prospect of immediate armed. .In- tervention by British- under' the 1E36 mutual assistance treaty with Egypt. The British foreign office said an Israeli armored patrol had penetrated Egyptian territory near the big Egyptian border military base of El Arish oir the Medlter- ranean coast. Harold Beeley, the British dele- gate in the council, did not give the date of the incursion, but said the Jews attacked a place about six miles inside Egyptian territory. He said his information came from the British embassy in Cairo. It WHS Beeley who alleged in the security council on Dec. 8 that the Jews had crossed into Trans-Jor- dnn, another Arab ally of the Brit- V1 Ish. Israeli denied the charge. The vin Trans-Jordan Arab legion liter said the action was by two pa- trols. This development came as the Close Probe Of Wrist-Slashing POUGHKEEPSIE, N. Y., Dec..29 The Dutchess county dis- trict attorney ended his investiga- tion today of the wrist-slashing of on in that mid-afternoon hour and less, the field lights were turned wife of Elliott, Roosevelt, declaring their yellow glow appeared "there has been no violation of Two Found Dead From Monoxide FOSTORIA, 0., Dec. 29 CD Two elderly persons were dead and a third was in serious condition in a hospital 'today as the result of carbon monoxide poisoning from a stove. Neighbors found Mrs. Kathryn McLaughlin, 92, and her son-in- law, David Y. Preble, 72, dead and Treble's wife, Maude, 72, uncon- scious In their home last night. Firemen revived Mrs. -Treble with oxygen. posed by Rep. Kean member of the House Ways and Means committee that originates Social Security legislation. The Republican-controlled 80th congress brushed' aside Mr. Tru- man's proposal for at least a 50 percent increase in Old Age In- surance benefits and broadening severely today and set off "trigger of the program to increase the cov- action" shocks felt throughout erage from some em-.......' ployed persons to I yesterday when an empty coal Attorney W. Vincent! truck "dumped" itself while law." District Grady made the announcement af- ter a conference with the late president's son. In a formal statement, Grady said: "Mr. Elliott Roosevelt has vol- untarily given me a complete state- ment as to his version of the inci- Top: George Morgan, 27, and Frank Rosenbcrry, 32, died in this crash which involved three tankers on an icy highway five miles north of Norristown, Pa., early yesterday morning. This picture shows the flaming truck in which Morgan died. Bottom: Traffic on the Cheat river bridge at Point Marlon, Pa., was held up for several hours Reno Jarred By New 'Quake RENO, Nev., Dec. A rumbling earthquake jarred Renojdent involving the cutting of the north-central California. No one was injured. Widely scat- wrist of his wife, Faye Emerson Roosevelt, on Dec. 26. "As I find it there has been crossing. The driver, Allen Fox, of Dlllinger, Pa., jumped to safety. (AP Wirephotos) Teachers Fight For Americanism COLUMBUS, 0., Dec. 29 (f> The Ohio Education Association Kean said his bill, which con-leered minor damage was reported, forms closely with the president's Telephone lines were down. suggestions for expansion, would extend old age protection to the self-employed, farm .workers, do- mestics and all other workers ex- cept those covered by special pro- grams, such' as federal employes, railroad employes, and some work- ers for state and local govern- ments. It would permit employes of tigntion i ter closed." Most roughly shaken was Verdi, a small mountain community 10 miles west of here. Windows were shattered, chimneys knocked over and plaster shaken hjose. A Reno newspaperman telephon- ed from Verdi, a community of 200, that "everything in town is dam- aged to some extent." The wall of the 33-year-old Verdi general store church groups to join if they de-1was knocked over. sired. PAY BOOSTED CINCINNATI, Dec. 29 City employes today were given cost-of-living wage increases, rang- ing from 6.9 to 10.1 percent. Salary Study Group Would Tie State Pay To Cost Of Living 0., Dec. An Ohio salary study commission group said- today future pay rafses for state workers should be lied to a federal cost of liv- ing index. A sub-committee headed by Sen. Carl D. Sheppard of Akron drafted the recommendation for the full commission to submit to the legislature convening Jnn. 3. The commission already has accepttd a report by the public administration service of Chicago propoiing a boost in pay for some state em- The increase would aver- age 7.8 percent. Previously accepted by the commiision a report by the private Chicago firm pvoposlng reduction In the number of state Job classifications. It would cut Job classifications to about 800. H. G. Pope, executive director of the survey service, also agreed u> supply the commission addi- tional reports on what state de- partments have too many work- ers and which have too few. The commission had refused to accept a report on reorganiza- tion of state government 'from Pope unless it contained data on overstaffingand understaffing of departments. State Auditor Joseph T. Fer- jniiinn. had stopped payment, on checks totaling in part payment for the governmental organization report and threat- ened to withhold an additional J10.000 unless the staffing data was supplied. Pope said the additional in- formation will be submitted to the commission at its next meet- ing Jan. 8. The commission is paying J65.000 for all the surveys undor legislative authorization. Akron Firm Raps Labor Board CLEVELAND, Dec. 29 tfi The Alside Co. of Akron, 0. ac- Icused the National Labor Relations Board today of illegally interfering IwitJi its personnel problems. I The firm fired 30 workers last September and the NRLB in Cleveland ordered it to appear at a hearing in Akron Jan. 4, 1949 to explain it-s actions. Alside contended the NLRB had no jurisriction over the case since j the workers were represented byi the United Steelworkers a union that so far has failed to sign non-Communist affidavits as re- quired by the TRft-Hartley lasv. Teachers Lost To Ohio COLUMBUS, O., Dec. 29 Marriage, business and the armed fcrces robbed Ohio of nearly teachers last year. The state education department. faced with its annual problem at finding teacher replacements, said today teachers left Ohio schools at the end of the 1947-48 school year. The largest loss was in the 701 women who gave up teaching to be married. Next on the list were the 437 lost to business. "That was because industry was still competing with schools for Dr. Clyde Hissong, state education director, commented. "Before long there will be a de- cided shift back to teaching from Lovett Hints At New Action Against Reds Assails Move By Communists In Hungary WASHINGTON, Dec. The United States as- sailed Communist moves in Hungary and China today, and hinted at American action to widen the rift between Yugo- jslavia and the other Communiat- jbloc countries. All these developments occurred at n news conference held by Uh- der-Secretary of State Lovett. Lov- security council wound up its Paris sessions before moving to New York by receiving a pledge from The Netherlands to end hostilities in Java at midnight, Friday, ns the old year goes out. The resolution on Palestine, on which the United Slates abstnined, ordered Israel and Egypt to cease (Turn to Page 2, Please) Congri iess" 80th Sings Swan Song On Next Friday WASHINGTON, Dec. 29 The Republican dominated 80th congress Is coming back hut not for-much or long. The 81st congress, with Demo- cratic majorities in both houses, will convene Monday. The SOth's last meeting shapes up as a one-day stand, with lots of swan song oratory and affec- ett told reporters: (1) General comments he has made previously on the desirability of east-west trade in Europe apply to the Yugoslav situation. Mar- shal Tito told parliament nt Bel- grade Monday that Soviet bloc na- tions had broken their trade agree- ments with Yugoslavia and he might have to turn Yugoslav trade to the west. Such a development has long been expected (2) The arrest In Hungary of Roman Inal Miodszenty on of treasonfiand the like was -a Lovett said the charges are obviously false and are the kind of'behavior typical .'of tht Communist countries. Such behav- ior, he said, makes peisce'an ex- asperation rather than a reality. The cardinal's arrest, he continued, Is the climax of n long lerles of actions against human and now religious freedom. 'War criminal" bv Chinese Communists no violation of the law. The inves-i closed its annual meeting today business and industry because of a is terminated and the mat- I with a plea to nil schools to teach 'Slackening in demand for employ- New President At Baldivin-Wallace BEREA, 0., Dec. L. Knighl, 33-year-old chancellor of Nebraska Wesleyan university, has been appointed president of Baldwin-Wallace college, it was anounced today. Dr. Knight, who held the Wes- leyan post since 1946, will take over at Baldwin-Wallace next June. He succeeds Dr. Alvin Rei- menscheider, who has been acting president since Dr. Louis C. Wright retired in July. At Lincoln, Neb., Dr. Knight his acceptance of the appointment at a special meeting of the executive committee of the Nebraska Wesleyan board of re- gents. The Weather Library Of Congress Gets Manuscript WASHINGTON, Dec. 29 Fritz Krei.-Jfr, the violinist and composer, has presented the Li- brary ol Congress with the origin- al manuscript of Brahms' concer- to for violin and orchestra. Dr. Harold Spivacke, chief of the library's music dlviiion, the gift, said today the concerto Is "one of the two or ever written" and that "naturally, we are delighted." OHIO cloudiness, windy and colder with a few snow flurries cast portion Thursday, colder at night. Friday cloudy and warmer. 10 a. m 44 B p. m 50 12 Noon 48 8 p. m 43 2 m 52 10 p. m 41 4. p. m 52 ia MldnlRht 33 ZANESYlif SUES TOUT Sunrlst i. m. p. m. Moorutt S'.IT p. m. Flrit Jin. 7th. PROMINENT STARS p. Rtgulul (rtM p. VISIBLE PLANETS Saturn 10.18 p. Vtnui (rises Americanism and international un- ment- will be going hack to derstandlng. Among a series of resolutions adopted by delegates to the asso- ciation meeting was one that read: "It is the responsibility of the schools to indoctrinate our youth in the American way of life so that they know it, believe In It and live in it continuously. "We urge that all schools con- tinue to teach the rights, privileges and responsibilities involved in liv- ing in a democracy." The teaching profession, said an- other resolution, "must accept the responsibility to educate our youth international understanding so that they may have a basic prep- aration to face the problems of living in an interdependent world." Report Survivors Of Crash Sighted MIAMI, Fla., Dec. unconfirmed report that survivors of a DC-3 charter plane missing almcwt two days had been sighted on a beach in Cuba was being checked by the Coa.it Guard. Coast Guard Air-Sea Reicue headquarters, directing the aerial search for the missing plane with 32 persons aboard, said military aircraft In the immediate vicinity had been diverted to'Cuba's cowt- line. Coast Guard headquarters em- phasized that the report was en- tirely unofficial, but is being check- ed as thoroughly as possible on the off-chance It may be correct. "The information we received did not even designate on which side of the Island the survivors were believed an officer Mid, "but we plan to every inch of coastline, if necewary, In the hope that we may light tome- thing." the security, good salaries and re- tirement benefits that teaching af- fords." Court Rules On Jobless Pay COLUMBUS, .O., Dec. 29 _ (IP) The Ohio supreme court today up- held suspension of unemployment compensation to Idle workers re- fusing Jobs similar to those they lost. The court affirmed action of the bureau of unemployment compen- sation head and the BUG board of in the political wars. There might even be a chorus or two of Auld Lang Syne by some of the uninhibited house members, In deference to New Year's eve. But there'll be little if any real business. The Republicans can take a hint, and the Democrats can af- ford to take their time. The date for the curious one- day stand was set last August 7, when the dog-days or turnip day extra session came to a close. Republican leaders wanted to keep the power to call the law- makers back any time they wish- ed, They couldn't do that if they adjourned sine Is, with- out n stated date to meet again. So they hit on December -31. Lots of pumpkins- have_passed over the witness stand since then, and things didn't work out in No- vember quite the way the Repub- lican leaders thought they would in August. But the 80th with that date. (3) made against Generalissimo Chiang Kai- Shek and other Chinese govern- ment leaders are unthinkable. Lov- ett said he did not believe that these charges represent the, view of the Chinese people or the 'e of any civilized country. Much of his conference thui WM dominated by questions bearing en developments in the cold war be- tween the United States and Soviet Union. 'i He said further In response tt> inquiry that Madame Chiang Kai- Shek, who previously hart seen President Truman and Secretary Marshall, called on him Monday. It was (i business call, he anrt Madame Chiang renewed her for American aid to China's hard- pressed Nationalist government congress Is stuck GOOD MOTHERS CINCINNATI, Dec. of the 500 to 600 foreign-born wives of American servicemen in this area havt proved to be good mates and John G. Olmstead, di- rector of; the citizenship reported todaj. Bargain Sales Of State COLUMBUS, O., Dec. 29 Gov.-Elect Frank J. quor director will have selling cases of ii'nii. liquor left over from public sales. The state liquor today the liquor is part of 000 worth of brands left on liquor store cases went at the sale. An addition- al cases were sold ia bulk-bids. The esllinatM- the sales cc4t the state rs-' council, ithe difference between [selling priceSjand the sale pricei. t3 i review in suspending jobless bene- fits to Rose Irene Nowak and David Bairn, Toledo garment workers. The administrator said they re- fused to accept referrals to sim- ilar jobs paying less money for which they were reasonably fit- ted. Lucas county common pleas court reversed the board and the appellate court affirmed. But the supreme court reversed lower court decisions and sustained the board of review. Believe Prince Doped For Christening LONDON, 29 The weekly news magazine, News Re- view, suggested today that baby Prince Charles given a small of sedative to keep him quiet during- the christening ceremony Dec. 15. The magazine noted the baby dozed peacefully all through the ceremony. It quoted a specialist saying a sedative wouldn't have the young prince any harm. Tax Barometer May Indicate Stormy Weather COLUMBUS, 0., Dec. The Ohio sales tax barometer is falling. It may be a storm.warning. Figures released today by State Treasurer Don H. Ebright confirm the retail trend has turned down gince mid-year. holiday trade figures when compiled aren't expected to check the drift t percent' sales tax. is major of money to pay for operating the gov- ernment. Any persistent decline could have wide-spread effects. Such If might crimp varioui to de- mand of the new itaff more aid for local welfare programs, pens- ions and the like. to the by chw.U and buying tales- tax still ahead of last year. But rtte rf gain dropped sharply sinct Ebright pointed out. He this to a com- bination of business alack and removal of the one-cent sates tax on under 41 cwita, itarting last Aug. 1. The year-end total probably will be about up sornr, from IMTl more tbM an 11 percent Jump. But Htte tax foe first months of IMt, kt- fore the one-cent ed about 18 percent tfct corresponding 1M7 gain -tor .Uw -.iMt half "montha, Uii t changt, WM would havtMtll 4DHflttM I Dec. 18 had tbr full tn i ed, been thu 10 pd slack ilx percent drop In gain since Auf 1, tt ed.   

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