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Zanesville Times Recorder Newspaper Archive: October 9, 1944 - Page 1

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Publication: Zanesville Times Recorder

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   Times Recorder, The (Newspaper) - October 9, 1944, Zanesville, Ohio                               Always First The Times Recorder Always Fair ;0THYfiAKr-NO.241 Charter member of AiBoclated ZANESVILLE, OHIO, MONDAY, OCTOBER WEATHER: Cloudy and Cool. House To House Fighting Inside Aachen Wendell Willkie Dies Evacuated In The Dawn By ERNIE PYLE Edilon Note In Urn anothe ot a erics o! Kinie Pvle war I pat ties that are belie reprlmel title Ernie takes a rest he i i t n IPS with his account of tl e defeat in Tunibii in the spring of 43 THE TUNISIAN IRO N I March 1943 The withdrawal of iut American foices from the vast Sbeitla valley back thiough Kas senne Pass was a majestic in a wa> It started before dawn c-c morn ng and continued with out a break for] 4 hours It nad no eat [marks of a le [treat whatever it was carried out so c a 1 m 1 and [methodically It differed in no jvvay except [from the normal [daily of jtroops and sup 'phes _ I left Sbeith m tfrme Pyle the l( Vehicles were so well spiced it was not difficult to piss on the wide grai el load And since 1 was not required to Keep lint I could go forward and back to get a gooa view OL LIIL eu i e m iv P ment Our planes were m the air al most constantly that daj So far as I have heard the Ger mans did not do a single roid stiafmg job m our vithdrawmg columns They missed a mignifi cent opportunity Why they didn 11 trv is still a mysterj to me First before daylight came tin kitchen trucks and engineers to prepare things ahead Then came lolling guns, and some infantry to up protection along the roads Then the great vast bulk of long supply trains field hospitals com mand posts ammunition wagons mf-mtry artillery and finally hen night came tanks Death Takes Well Known American L Willkie Republican presidential nominee in 1940 wh died unexpcctedlv in a New York hospital early Sundaj morning Willkie entered the hospital on September 6 for a rest He had bee impiovmg but suffered thiee heart attacks shortly before his death Cards Beat Browns 2-0 To Lead World Series SPORTSMAN S PARK St Louis Oct dimensions of two hits spelled the difference between a pair of great pitching perform- ances todaj and gave the Cardinals a 2 to 0 decision over the Browns in the fifth game of the World Series plajed before 36568 the largest turnout of the all St Louis National league a lead of three biseball classic Cirning the champions into started and moved on until the next dawn The whole thing was complete l> motorized Nobodv was valk ing It was hard to realize part of it that this was a Amencin foices in Iprge numbers were retreating in foreign battle one of the few time> in our history We couldnt help feel a slight sense of humiliation Yet while it was happening that humiliation was somewhat overcome bj oui pride in the oiderlmess and ac complishment It simply could not have been the billot battle endin done- better Militaiv police patrolled the road with jeeps and motolcycles to see thai there was no passing no traffic jams no loitering Corn Belt To Be Political Battleground WASHINGTON Nov b-vft Hot battle ending in our weeks Republicans and De lats are training some of their Not manv of oui American trucks broke down and those that dd were taken in lou There were almost no acu dents The withdiavval from Fenana and Thelepte airdrome was separ ate and smaller than ouis Ihcv were evacuated m the dawn horns Ammunition dumps vver" set off nnd all gasoline that could not he moved was set ablaze Planes that took off I hat mo n ing on dawn missions did noV re turn to the field but landed else where All planes that could not get off the ground because of damage or needed repfii ie burned There never was anything built above ground at Ihelepte hi cause jig guns this states which manv on miavvestcrn political ana games to two and giving big Mo Cooper an edge over Denny Gale house were home runs by First Baseman Hay Sanders and Left fielder Danny Litvvhiler Fans 12 Brownies Cooper who lost a two hitter to Galehouse in the opening game last Wednesday turned in an even greater job as he fanned 12 Brownies onU one short of the World Series record set by How ard Ehmke of the Philadelphia Athletics against the Chicago Cubs just 15 years ago to the day Gale house struck out ten and allowed .only six hits to Morts seven but his teammates couldn t match the layoff blows by Sanders in the ,xth and Litwimer in the eighth Together Cooper and Galehouse lung up a new series record for stiikeouts for two clubs passing )y one the mark of 21 established >y the Chicago Cubs and White Sox m the 1906 series and matcned by the Athletics and Cubs in the second game of the champion ship Fans Three In Row Death Due To Ailment Of Heart NEW Oct 8 ff) .'endell L Willkie 52 Indiana- orn lawyer who skyrocketed from ohtical unknown to Republican residential nominee in 1940 ant ubsequent national and mterna' onal prominence died unexpect dly at 2 20 a m (EWT) in Lenox ill hospital Death due to coronar, irombosia Dr Alexander Ghise throat specialist said a treptococci infection affected the eart muscles and that Willkit led in his sleep after suffer n; hree attacks the last of wh ch ccurred at 2 a m With him at the end in addihu o Dr Ghisehn were his persona ihvsictan Dr Benjamin Salzer us w if e w ho also had been vith a sore throat and Lamoyn ones Willkie s personal secretar ind spokesman m 1940 The Willkies have one child Philip a lieutenant (j g) on dut vith the somewhere in mi( ocean Willkie whose death followe by less than two days funera services for Alfred E Smith 192 Democratic presidential condidat will be buried in the family plo at Rustnille Ind it was nounced but funeral plans vver deferred pending word from th son The body was to remain at funeral parlor over night and b taken to the Fifth Avenue Presb; terian church tomorrov, morning The colorful 200 po nd tousl headed Hoosier who first gaine recognition as president of Cot monwealth Southern corpor tion entered the hospital Sept for a physical check up and res The throat infection develop Wednesday His condition becam critical at midnight last night an he was placed in an 0x5 gen ten Jones who announced the deal said Willkie awoke at 1 a rn the oxygen tent vrasiemoved b :ause the patient appeared Impro ,ysK list as doubtful I leven of them with 164 elet toral votes are going to hear en increasing amount of oratorical persuasion befoie the election Nov Thej are Illinois Indiana Iowa Michigan Minnesota Missouri Ohio Wisconsin Kentuckv Okla homa and Kinsis Lone Traveller Elev en month old James Michae ojacich Jr plajs with a tov ir Jearborn railroad station Chicago 1 after he arrived from Kansa ity Mo a 451 mile journey alon nth of his fathers cash lojacich Sr stepped from th ram at Kansas. City to purchas igarets and found the train ha eparted when he returned (A'. rephoto) Belgrade Reported isolated LONDON Oct If) rmies smashed 63 miles irough Nazi lines on a 175 mile ront in four dajs overrunning 2 00 localities in a drive aimed at erman East Prussia and pene- rating within 45 miles of the Bal- port of Memel Premier Mar hal Joseph Stalin announced to ight m an order of the The massive breakthrough with tie double purpose of looping off Cast Prussia and trapping scores thousands of Germans in the a area and northwestern Lat- was announced shortlv after Berlin told of a Russian crossing of he Danube northwest of Belgrade Yugoslav capital and furlhei Rec armv gains m Hungarj The Germans said the Russians Yonks Win Breach Third Army In Push On Wide Front ea When he awoke Jones sa Mr Willkie began to joke wi the nurse as she swabbed h throat commenting when how he felt how can I talk with mv mouth full of that stuff Mrs Willkie arrived at the bed side five minutes before her hus Dand died She saw him although his face as concealed by the oxygen Dr Ghisehn said 'he was (Turn to Page 7 Please) [n Demand For An End Of Secrecy NEW YORK Oct Thomas E Dewev called for an end of the secrecj which he said was shrouding some postwar European planning today as he stopped oft here to pay tubule to Poland s hero of the American Revolution Count Casimir Pulaski The Republican piesidential nominee homeward bound from a speech in Charleston W Va re- viewed the annual Pulaski Day parade from a stand on Fifth ave nue and declared all sensitive Americans would like to see Poland reestablished as an independent and sovereign nation reborn upon a basis which will be permanent We would like to know more about the plans for that consum mation he said We would like to know more about the results of the private deliberations of :hose who now discuss Poland s 'uture in secrecy Dewej who said earlier he had vere using 200000 men m the Bal c offensive west of Siauliai u .ithuama Stalms order of the day ad dressed to Gen Ivan Bagramian ?irst Baltic arm> commander dis closed that Telsiai 42 miles wes of Siauliai and 45 miles northwes Memel m German East Prussia Nad fallen in the still rolling of fensiv e The order also was addressed to troops of the Third White Russian army commanded by Gen Ivan Chermakhovsky Reception difficulties were en countered here in the Soviet mom tors recording of the towns cap tured but among those definitely listed m the order of the day were Telsiai and also Kelme 25 miles southwest of Siauliai 40 miles from le East Prussian frontier and 55 lies from Tilsit In some areas the Russians were nly 35 miles from East Prussia an operation which is expected be coordinated with Soviet ashes toward Lower East Prus a from bridgeheads across the 'arevv river in northern Poland The Germans announced that .ussian troops had thrown two ndgehesds across the half mile >ide Danube near the Tisza river ibuth 23 miles northwest of the 'ugoslav capital and Marshal (Turn to Page 5 Please) Arrows show Ametican drives noith of Aachen where U S First army forces drove eastward from Beggendorf and Herbach Black line is the front the regular season leached greatest heights in the sixth when (Turn to Page 10 Please) Hillman Not To Speak At Forum Meet NEW YORK Oct Wi'lmai! chairman of the CIO po htical action committee withdrew todav as a New York Herald Tri the field had to tal e" too much bombing TverythinR was un lei sleeping unite" and the rest Njthing shovel ibove ground except plmcs themselves and the little Kneeing! mounds that wue duput roof-. Attesting their importance in lurd fought rate is the possibility I hat both President Roosevelt am I homos E Deuev may appear in Ihe midwest to bolster their cam The Republicans alreadv, have their piesidenlial nominee Buckii touring the area His Demociatu opponent Senator llarrv S Truman will tiavcrse it on the retuin 'eg of a stumping toui aiound the tountrj the Democrats have start ed Secrclarv of luilture Wick aid into the coin belt for heavy cvmr lifting m Ohio Indiana Ken tuckv Missouri Oklahoma Kansas Illinois Inwa Wisconsin and Mm Air Apaches Hit The Enemy With Kitchen Sink FIFTH U S AIR FOPCF AD VANCE BASE OFF DUTCH NEW had o happen sometime On a recent mission over the louthein Philippines an Amer can B 25 outfit the Air Apaches hit he eneim with eluding the kitchen sink For 17 months the Air lave been smacking the Japanese from Papua to Mindanao Their Is sunk On" officer lust as le 'eft nek rd on his dugout dooi n nig news paper map of the InteM Kuss in line so the ernnns could s, o it T011S when they came Iheie vvpie r.omh cv.lnn Of Ollde Rubber c fllRees on oui iond enough to lundti ,pir aie supplvmg the United Slates wilh 78000 tons of crude WASHINC IOM walked nrrvmg brown wit asrs and bundles I noticed Ihcv bd not carry much bo tliv ip parentlv had failh in our coming hnrk I here were few Ai ibs among them The Arabs aie pemnncni Ihey gel along vvhocvoi ecncs ti hke charge of then cunliv trench ailillciv and nf also wire wilhdnwirg I lipv In hinder traffic after wr were sifr K hack at Kassermc Pass and Hit- loan prow narrow nnd nnr I Across the soft sand I tench h nnd horscdrawn ill1- fv thousands hmd tlr1 teals Wo well knew the Flench w ie Ihe best fighters in the world But ibis delaying slicam of luM wheeled carts toiling alonp so Insi century like seemid svmbolic 01 whole disnsloi The big fine French hospital lust outside Knsscrine was c-vncu ated too nnd the rrench sup" visor gave nwav he In 1 Ao American soldiers Ilntish commonwiallh souicesthis nhhPt a reverse lend basis 'lie foreign economic admin istration announced todnj Representing mole thnn half the )lal (ommoiweilth 11 eduction for the shipments ale a{ larger than anti ipated S crude rubber orts fron nlher souicrs this- vear I-EA the vcir I ie I To Times Recorder City Readers Should >ou foil to get vour limes Recorder morning nlcisc call 17 before 10 n m ,nd a will OP drlivered to bv specml delixr v The mrlirr call the better sen UP we nre ible to Rise v.our solicited Driant CONFERENCE SITE pianes bHsled fo.ts uppoitmg the WASHING I ON Oct The Dmnt garrison from the cast side seore to date is 163 218 aircraft destroved on the ground and 91 more shot lomhat the crew of Capl Max II Moilensens piane Pitas Vv agon found a riMv sink k eking around their camp at ibis advanced Hand thev knew what to dr with it Waiting fo- an ai pro] riate mis sion crew chiefs and armament men gave the sink a lane1 na nt job When hnsted into Ritas bombav along with more conven tional instrument of demo ition the domestic hardware was flvinf in distinguished Capt Mortensen Chninpaign 111 pilot, and 'light loadci was on Rlthl combat mission The sink WHS chilv unloaded on he objective EDITOR S MOTIIFR DIFS AI I IFOI IS O Ocl 8  Id 4 son of Mr and 'Mis Haivev Nlissbaum of nearbv Ml Faton vvs killed (when struck bv a truck bune forum speaker almost simul- taneously with a protest by Demo (.ratic National Chairman Robert E Hannegan at the choice of Hill man to present the Democratic lew point Hannegan told a press confer ence thit Hillman was an officer of the American Labor party and that I would have suggested a regular Democrat to present the part> s ew point at the forum Oct 18 Later Hillman said m a tele gram to the Herald Tribhne I have decided that your plac ing me m the position of speaker for the Democratic party at the Herald Tribune forum necessitates mv withdrawing from any partici pation whatever Hillrmn said that when he ac cepted the invitation of Mrs Helen Rogers Reid uce president of the New Tribune Inc to speak al the forum he understood he was to speak as chairman of the po htical action committee received asburances that he wouk je kept adv of dev elopments at the Dumbarton Oaks poslw ar Dlannmg conference declared Polish Americans would do wel to do everything in their power to bring discussion of Poland s fate from the dark to the light The New York governor wh' assailed President Roosevelt in a broadcast from Charleston las night for what he termed the pres idents soft disavowal of Com munist support headed back ti Albanv after reviewing the Pulasn Da> parade and receiving Repubh can workers at the Waldorf Astoria hotel His plans for the re't of til campaign remained al though speaking engagements hav been announced for Mmneapoh on Oct 24 Chicago on Oct 25 am Boston on 1 In the reviewing at and on th steps of New York s public library Dewey occupied a seat three place (Turn to Page 6 Gen. Patton's Men Smash Forward For Six Miles I S THIRD HEAD QUARIERS Oct Gen George S Patton s new drive be tween Met? and Nincy smashe forward six miles todij and cleai ed the eneim from eighl towns Places liberated included Clem erj Lixieres Serneres Toan Di lamcourt F P s s i e u Ajoencourt and Arrajc Lt Han While doughboys inside Fo Big Aerial Offensive Continued LONDON Oct 8 The mighty Allied aerial offensi which poured morp than 16 000 tons of explosues from 7000 planes .yesterday on German targets con tmued today with medium light and fighter bombers blasting Nazi commumca ions and supply depots despite bad weather Switching from yesterdays record actical strategical bombing offense more than Protests He is Innocent Of Murder WASHINGTON Oct WcFarland Marine corps pmat" barged with murder in the golf ourse strangling of 18 year old Dorothy Berrum War Department lerk appeared today in a police ineup with five other marines be ore severs! persons who had given nformation in the case None of the witnesses includ ng a taxicab driver who said re drove the tiny girl and her escor o the Potomac park course earlv Triday morning was able to say defimtelv that McFailand was the jerson they had decnbed McFarland continued today to protest his innocence under ques .loning by Detective Chief Robert J Barrett Barrett said McFarland ques tioned m the presence of his attor nev P Bateman Ennis said that had no children Navy sources said his record showed that he had a wife and two children n New Ma-ket Tenn The detective chief said McFarland told him todav that his wife was partially pan lyzed in childbirth two weeks ago and that the child died The body of the slain girl v ho Coronei A Magruder MacDonald said was raped before being gar roted with her snood was turned over today to her father R S Beirum of Chippewa Falls Wis ttmth ajr force Marauders and rlavocs raked German commumca :ions and supply depots m the Rhmeland and Ruhr servicing the Nazi armies opposing the American invasion of the Feich Fighter bombers slashing through more than 200 Nazi fight ers ranged m great strength through the Rhine valtev and be hind the German armies from Saarbrucken to Dusseldorf bomb ing and strafing airfields military positions and water and rail trans port A heavj fog over Holland Bel gium and northeastern France grounded the bulk of Allied air power and air chiefs re connaissance photographs of the damage inflicted on the Nazi war machine bj yesterday s record on si aught Two of the German s largest tank production plants were (Tuin to Page 6 Please) southwest of battled gre it odds American Finnish, German Troops Battle Fiercely STOCKHOLM Oct msh troops steidilv driving their Stite Department announced Sat urdav that Hie Hotel in Chicago has been selected as the site of the Intermtional Conference opening Nov 1 of the Mosel B 26 medium Classified Closes At 6 P. M. Daily Lffettive immedialfh business offices including the Classified Depaitmcnt of the Signal and Times Recorder wiU close ai 6 o clock each dav ind that hour will be the deadline for the acceptance of Clarified Advertising cop> On Sundajs the office will be open foi one hour onl> in the 5 to 6 o clook This change is necessarj in order to conform to wartime mail transportation schedules The cooperation of our pa trons and the public is asked and will be appreciated bomber-, dumped former German partners from Ship Hunting Planes Sink Jap Vessels ALLILD HEADQ b A R T E R S NEW GUINt-A Monday Oct hunting Allied planes sank or destroyed 25 Japanese coastal vessels and small craft in strikes around Ceram and Halmahera icadquarters reported today Airfields also were bombed dur ing the widespread raids Fnda> Four Japanese float planes were destroyed at Zamboanga southern Philippines by a neavy patrol plane The assault was aimed at Wolfe Field and the bise Ramp installations i hingar and a bomber were damaged Patrol planes scored hits on the mportant Pandinsiri oil refmerv at Bahkpapan Bornro Thursday n ght and Fridav morning This petroleum center has been raided in force twice recently Twentv thiec of the coastal ves sels were hit off Ceram by medi um bombers fighter bombers and patrol planes Thirty four tons of exp'osives were dropped on air dromes and birncks Fighter bombers hit the Kaoe airdrome on Halmahera with 1000 pound bombs and set fire to a smali LONDON Monday, Oct Front line reports reaching Lon- don early today said American First armv troops were engaged in house to house fighting Aachen while the American Third army forged six miles ahead on a 20 mile front between Metz and Nancy American infantry entered Aachen which is almost entirely surrounded by the American forces irom the southeast the reports to the British press said The German radio said the Americans had thrown two fresh tank divisions into the battle north of Aachen where attacks now have assumed the character of a major assault Their newest assault launched before dav n from east of Aachen, carried to within 1000 yards of the enemy s last road to Cologne. Above the city, other troops from the Ubach break- through in the Siegfried Line, stiuck a mile deeper south bring- ing in the upper jaw of. the vise Even as the Aachen front blazed along a 30 mile sector the Third army to the south in France struck between Metz and Nancy _ a 20 mile front quickly top- ping eight towns in a six mile ad- vance But ground was lost farther north in the furious bloody strug- gle for Fort Dnant which the southwestern approaches to Metz Planes supported the two Amer- ican army drives A small task force with tanks and self propelled guns probed the defenses of Aachen itself biggest city encountered m the Invasion of Germany Thirty seventh city of the pre war Reich it was the size ot Nashville Tenn or Hartford, Conn With a little more progress the city will be pinched off, an Ameri- can officer said Staging one of their rare night assaults Lt Gen Courtney H Hodges men southeast of Aachen caught the Germans by surprise, hit up east of the besieged city, and late today seized Crucifix Hill, dominating the ground near Haaren I1! miles northeast of Aachen They were within little more than half a mile of the Aachen- Cologne road sweeping that last escape loute for the Nazis in Aachen with shell and heavy ma- chmegun fire The strength of the Aachen defenders was not known but a Reuters dispatch esti- mated it as low as 1500 S S troops In the upper wing of an Aachen squeeze First army men who scored the Siegfried breakthrough at Ubach cleaned out Alsdorf, seiz- ed Afden and thrust within four miles of their comrades near Haaren A three pronged German coun- ter attack toward Alsdorf was flung back Generally resistance north of Aachen appeared to be melting In the Hurtgen forest area south east of Aachen other doughboys advanced through the dense pine woodlands and were within 7 miles of Duren 20 miles from Cologne Lt Gen George S Pattona Third army attack was aimed at wiping out a shallow German salient The towns of Clemery, Lixieres Seineres Jeandelam- court Moivrons Fessieux A'o" court and Arraye Et Han were captured in a sector a dozen to 20 miles below Metz In Fort Driant most lastion protecting Metz dough- joys battled against odds and a night counter attack erased laif the Americans 100 yard gain of Saturday inside the mile and a half long fortress made sallies from bulk- leaded underground passages and .Iso fought from pillboxes raised i> hydraulic lifts Allied planes pounded supporting forts across the Moselle river knocking out ;uns that had taken a toll of Driant s attackers and sending Turn to Page 5 Please) Finnish soil stormed into the outckirts where of the port fierce battle of Kemi tons of bombs on the forts and! sent great chunks of gun case ments skj high Gun studded hills of the Verdun chMn were left virtually bald bv the day s aerial assault one of the heaviest yet Directed against the Metz fortificllions Egyptian Cabinet Is Dismissed CAIPO Oct King fa rouk hns d smissed the cihinet under Nnhas Pasha The news has caused a sensa tion m Cairo where it was made known bv official radio announce nents It has long been known that differences existed between the king ind prime minister It was no questions of foreign policN were Formation of a new eminent s-v entrusted to Achmed Maher Pasha a communique from Helsinki announced today Kemi is at the northern nf the Gulf of Bothma near the Swedish frontier some 400 mil-s north of Helsinki The Finnish war bulletin also announced the capture of the large age of Hosio 10 miles north t of Remi but seid the Germans were making violent attempts to break into Tornealv 15 miles northwest of Kemi seired bv the Finns a week ago m an effort to cut off merman retreat freighter and coastal vessel Another one plane Japanese raid :0n adjacent American held Morotai 1 caused minor casualties The Weather OHIO Mondav cloudy windy nd cool showers with occasional light 10 a m 12 Noon 2pm TMIPfRATlRFS 53 4 p m 53 6 P m 54 8 p m 5f 10 p m 08 12 MIlntRht Order Comdr. Mathew s To Sea Duty COLUMBUS O Oct 8 Capt Philip R Weaver ISN (ret will succeed Comdr R H G Mathews USNP as mv> inspectot of recruiting and induction foi the Fifth joint service induction area it was announced todav Comdr Mathews formerlv of Indianapolis has been ordered to sea dut> after serving here since Februarv 1942 Lnder iiesiit plans Capt Weaver vvho is inspector foi 'he Sixth area with headquarters ir Chicago will handle both distnc s dividing his time beU een Colum bus and Chicago offices BANK PRESIDENT DIES OTIAWA Ohio Oct 8 P Palmer 67 president of the Continental Ohio bank at near Continental dien Siturdav at p m home attack. WAR SUMMARY WESTERN FRONT Major foices of Thud aimy lump off to new 20-mile wide of- fensive north of Nancy as breakthrough drives con- tinue at Aachen ITALIAN FRONT. Dough- boys drive to within 12 miles of Bologna as Allied tioops captuie three moun- tain peaks m northward as- sault PACIFIC FRONT New Al- lied stnkes result in de- struction of more Japanese coastal vessels Jap pre- mier appeals for greater production RUSSIAN FRONT: Belgrade reported isolated as attack on Yugoslav capital begins. Naval forces strike in Sa- lonika harbor. 4 t,   

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