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Zanesville Signal: Friday, August 10, 1956 - Page 1

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   Zanesville Signal, The (Newspaper) - August 10, 1956, Zanesville, Ohio                               Thm Signal 11 Comics ....................8 Deaths.....................2 Serial'Story.........'.......5 Sports .....................9 Weather Map ..............2 Women's News ............7 THE ZANESVILLE SIGNAL Associated Press AP NEA. Telephones 93RD 65 12 PAGES AUGUST SEVEN CENTS Fair OHIO-Mostly fair with lit- tle chango in temperature to- day through Saturday. Low tonight C4-70. Yesterday's High 37 Today's Low a. m. 64 a. m. Today........SO And the Jam Is Getting Pictures Tell the Why New Bridge Is Needed Water Referendum Out. Solicitor These pictures show why Zanesville needs .a new bridge across the Muskingum river. A typical scene of motorized con- fusion at the Linden avenue end of the hour at 5 p.m. AT This was happening at the other end of the where the long line of cars was backed all the way across the river Elberon aviaie. These photos were taken by Signal cameraman Don Work May Begin Next Year On First of Two New Spans The-daily -Jams- at each end of the Fifth Street bridge demon- better than all the traffic that Zanesville needs a new bridge across the Muskingum river. And the situation'seems to be getting worse every Recent approval by trie state cf plans for the first of tv. o new a short distance downstream from the Fifth Street is another step toward solving the traffic problem. And the jam-up on the iressway OKdatNewark Ohio State Highway Director S. 0. Linzell to- day approved construction a expressway in Newark Linzell said he had previoush planned to withhold his decision until after the election.' He said today's .action was prompted by reports that a group of Newark citizens were initiating an ordinance to repeal the city's original ordinance of agreement to cooperate with the highway de- partment on construction of the expressway. The four-lane limited access ex pressway is-four-fifths of a mile long and includes two grade sep- arations and a bridge. The proj- ect is scheduled for letting next Nov. 27. Linzell am convinced that the repeal ordinance if would be of no but there appears to be no point in further delaying such an important proj- ect1 The project located on Ohio 16. has been approved by the U.S. Bu- reau of Public Former Editor's Wrft Dies at 78 Ohio Fifth Street bridge is not bad the traffic exocr-'s uoint out that it will be much worse even before the first of the new bridges is built. It is anticipated that the the engineering plans will be completed by Alden E. Stilson and Associates Columbus' in time for advertising of bids next summer. That means that work wffl begin before fall of next with a completion date of 1953. With the city expanding ra- pidly toward'the the traf- fic is increasing each year over the present Fifth Street which carries an estimated SO percent of all the be tween the business district and the Terrace section. It is still believed possible to retain the Fifth Street bridge the construction of a new rarnp at the east end in order to avoid interference with the new bridge. British Snub Red Bid to Delay Parley Suez Conference To Go on Despite Soviet Objections LONDON Britain today brushed aside Soviet Russia's bid to recast and postpone next veek's London parley on the Canal crisis. This was officially indicated by the Foreign Office after high-lev- el talks between Wash- ington and Paris. At the same time Prime Min- ister Eden's for the second successive slowed down its trooplift to the Mediter- ranean. Eden and his military chiefs or- dered a second 24-hour postpone- ment of the airlift of crank in- fantrymen to the Suez area. Somei troopship moves also were held up. The slowdown came as Egyp proclaimed formation of a new 'national liberation and world anxiety mounted the possibilities of a blowuo. The latest objection to Britain's of force in the Mediterran- ean came from the desert king- Workmen Beat the Heat With the temperature standing at 95 degrees at N. Nelson Tisdale stand- and his work crew donned Bermuda shorts 'and knee-length socks to beat the heat laying a hot tar mixture on a parking lot. Approximately be made possibly for this by the fact that tie aty's share of the total cost is being halved as a result of the iew federal highway prograrn. The only reason the state and government are contrib- ig so generously toward the con of two new bnJges will be here at 2 p. m. ior Mrs. Ma TV A- Bigelow. of wife editor here is the fact that these to the L' of Good Housekeeping She died Thursday in Jane M. Case Hospital Her who retired in 1S32. now is a trustee of Ohio Wesleyan University. Bigdow also leaves three daughters. Mrs. Margaret B. Dun- ham of Miriam Criss of Ohio and Mrs. Mary Shridcr of Harbor a Howard Koch of and sev- en grandchildren. Burial win be fn Oak Grove here. And the main reason that Roale wiU come through the ir- stcad of bypassing is the fact that traffic survcvs and engineer- gave support to Weather Elsewhere Low cloudy..........S3 '72 clear..........S3 54 dear 90 55 cloudy 85 66 cieSr............FS 82 JLOS tloudy SI 67. New clear 95 New rain S9 cloudy........105 cloudy 75 74 73 80 51 Car Knocks Down State Patrolman Ohio High- way patrolman Earl Reich was knocked down by a car Thursday night while helping direct traffic at a celebration welcoming home the Ashland which had just successfully defended jts Ohio Little Leaegue baseball title at Cactoxx A short time after chase at high a 27 vear old man was arrested on U.S- 250. Chief Deputy Sheriff Paul who also was amons offi- cers helping direct traffic in front of the Montgomery Twp. school building- said he saw Reich faH after trying to avoid the onrush- ing car. Boalcs jumped into a cruiser and gave chase at speeds he said ranged up to 110 m.p.h. bc4fore catching Ernest E. Colvartt of Mich. Corvartt was fined and costs convene to pick a presiden- for reckless driving on placed by the sheriffs office and heled at County dom of on Egypt's west- ern flank. Informed diplomats said that the Arab which Britain helped to was un- derstood to have refused a Brit- ish request for additional facili- ties under the Libyan British bases to accommodate troops that might have to be used in an emergency. The British For- eign Office refused to comment In Libyan Premier Mustafa Ben Halim announced his country's support of Egypt's seizure of the Suez Canal. The -who is visiting told reporters one has the right' to attack Presi- Nasser for the H-jssian orooosals to oo-'lpone. enlarge and change scoe of the London talks came Thursday night in a public statement and a still-secret note to Britain. The two together comprised thj Sovi- et's Union's answer to Britain's invitation to attend the slated Aug. 16 conference. The Foreign Office Sir George told reporters he not lend any tothe possble postponement of the talks to late as sug- gested by Russia. The Russians set forth nearly a Stevenson Supporter Says Truman to Back Harriman Former President In Key Position As Party Prepares for Convention CHICAGO One of Adlai Stevenson's advisors expressed belief today that Harry S. Truman is preparing to his support to Gov. Averell Harriman for the Democratic presidential dozen objections to the manner in which has sought to or- ganize the talks. They suggested Zairo be a better meeting place than that the talks should be deferred until -Vi- gust and that 22 other ncluding Red China. Communist Eiast Germany and all Middle East Arab should be in- vited. The the Former President as well as a supporter1 Stevenson. He said is convinced Truman will make an announcement support- ing Harriman we can convince him it would be a grave the informant insisted that can win the norn- nation even if Truman declares or the New York governor. Ve have the delegates and only a fraction can be taken he said. we are convinced that larriman can't be nominated un- der any .Truman said earlier that he will announce his choice between Stev- enson and Harriman at a news Saturday. After his return from a morn- ing the ex-President re- ceived his second call in two days from Adlai Stevenson. Stevenson emerged from the in Truman's suite on the fifth floor of the Blackstone in what had aH the ear- marks of a showdown conference. As to whether he had won Tru- man's Stevenson replied feel just as good today as I did yesterday and the day be- Stevenson quipped that at his meeting with Truman de- from Forecast Here Fair weather is in store here tonight and forecasters said today. The mercury stood in the mid- 80s here today after dipping to a low of 64 degrees at municipal airport early this morning. More than half an inch of rain pelted this area yesterdav ruier- noon and early last night. Many streets ran curbful as storm sewers overflowed. Observers at the CAA com- munications station at the air- port said the rainfall totaled inch. f in a five-day out- forecasters said tempen- tnres 'would average about nor- mal with cooler weather expected Tuesday and Wednesday. Thunder-showers are indicated Dulles Explains Sunday Meeting WASHINGTON of States Dulles said today President Eisenhower called a Sunday meeting with congressional lead- ers on the Suez Canal crisis be- cause the President very about-sharing responsi- bility with particularly if there should be any risk of hos- tilities.1' Dulles don't see anything in the situation now which would suggest that a spe- cial session of Congress would be The Secretary talked briefly with reporters before taking off for New York to meet with Sec- retary General Dag Hammar- skjold of the United and U. S. Ambassador Henry Cabot Lodge Jr. The luncheon meeting was for a general discussion of Middle East problems including Egypt's seizure of the Suez Canal. Eisenhower Thursday called congressional leaders to meet at the White House rn- port on the canal. dispute. This stirred specualtion about the pos- sibility- of a special session of Congress later on. Dulles are making our plans on the assumption there will be a peaceful Dulles will attend in London next Thursday the conference of 20 to 24 nations invited by Britain ays Move to Halt Rate Increase Is Rejected Taxpayers1 League Still Circulating However An ordinance increasing yille water rates Is not subject to in the opinion of City Solicitor Don Hollingsworth- This was made known last night at a meeting of the recently-fonh- ed Taxpeyars and Citizens lea-- gue which is circulating petitions to bring the matter up for vote in November. ft was announced today that petitions- are still la circulation and will be filed be fore the August 27 deadline. A letter from Francis hart- acting city was read at last night's meeting. The letter quoted Hollingsworth as expressing the opinion that the ordinance is not subject to ferendum. Zanesville voters at the May primary approved a waterworks improvement to be paid for by the increased rates which have since been voted by city council. Also approved at that was a proposal for the construction of a sewage disposal and the extension of storm sewers. These improvements will be financed by a sewer use-charge. ..The letter from Burkhart to Al chairman of the Taxpay- this state- T has asked me to inform yon in his said is not subject-'tb -The city solicitor is on a two-week tour of reserve of- ficer training duty at Fort Md. said that the petitions will-be with-the clerk of council and. if they are the issue will be taken to court. It was thafths League's attorney is David man ot a brother cf Ja- cob well known Ohi3 CIO leader. Tuesday and to seek a peaceful Suez solution with rainfall averaging one-half through creation of international o one inch. Fair weather prevailed today m most areas west of the Rock- es and east of the Aaalachians. Skies also were mostly clear in he southeast part of the nation. 64 PAGES SIX SECTIONS 100 PICTURES In The Sunday Times Signal THE FTKST ACT in the big- gest political show on earth opens Monday in Chicago where Deino- A survey of all antomobDcs Division Command cztcring the dry OB U. S. Route 40 from the west showed on a typical onry S3 per cent represented while the other 47 per cent of the cars had ZaaesviDe as their destination. During every 24-hOTr period. approximately cars pavs through Zanesville on U. S. Route 40. according to a projection of the latest survey which was taken several years ago. BOY DIES OF INJURIES DAYTON. Ohio Mc- 15-year-old high school j When the traffic destined for or today in Miami Valley here is Hospital of head injuries received no-mixc of cars ihis i Wedncsday when he fell off a trac- way to enter or leave the city is tor on a farm south of Xenia. doubled. CAMP Xy. Leo Krcbcr. a 34- year veteran of Ohio's T7jh In- fantry announced today he win relinquish command of the 37th Aug. 15. The announcement was accom- panied by tears as Kreber made his decision from the re- viewing stand. Kreber wOl con- throe as Ohio's adjutant general. With Krcbcr at his last review as general of his beloved division vras Maj. Gen. Robert S. Rcight- who Jed the outfit through World War H in the Sooth 1 and Gov. Frank J Lauscbe. ROCKY GLEN sanatorium at McCoaadsvinic is the first pri- photos and background stories onfvate medical institution in Ohio _r_. _n _ t _______ The Soaday Times Signal will cany a fuH page the upcoming convention. This is a must for your Sunday reading. IPS FAIR TIME again. 110th annual Moskxnguxn county exposition wiU open at the Persh- ing road grounds Tuesday. Up- wards of 30.000 attend the five-day event. If yon arc a fair goer and almost everyone yea win want to read the special fair section in this week's edition of The Times Signal FOR THE Summer time is not only party time for adults so the Times Signal photo- grapher gives us a feature aboct there's a menu for Sunday mom-sky is 20 longer man's A discusses the possible effects ing brunch and an unusual re- cipe in the Keyboard Chatter. to use the newest of the mirack in treatment of tuberculosis with amazing results. You wiU want to read this Times Signal article on the newest weapon of medical sci- ence in the fight against this dreaded disease. MANY PIECES of carry Zanes- vifle pottery arc rare collec- tors' items. The story of these pieces and an authentic account of the development of this import- ant Zancsvilie mdustry arc com- bined b a fascinating artide in the Times Signal prepared by Nonis F. outstanding for stories in the Week-.the Times Signal And that's just a part of Altogether there are more than a THE TIMES SIGNAL parade of dozen special features and articles pages in in this week's edition of fuB of humor and Times Signal magazine supple-iThis week Mr. Dithers aixl Dag- a party planned for small fry local historian and writer. next Tuesday. .there's more nuptial news as August bids for A GHOST TOWN comes back. popularity as a bridal moathu A mule train moves The wave of terror ends in a due to the killer's holiday All these incidents are subjects may have oa the nation's economy in his hand-hit- ting a regular feature of machinery to control the Suez. The U. S. it was learned has circulated to the countries which will attend the London conference a for an international authority .vith corcplete control over the use of Suez and its fees and finances. The key to the success of the Railroads Ask Fare Increase WASHINGTON GO TLe Jhw York the Pennsylvania and other Eastern railroads to- day asked the Interstate Com- merce Commission for authority to increase first class passenger fzres 45 per cent The roads'also seek permission to boost coach fares 5 per. In confirming the long expected the Central and Pennsyl- vania said in a joint have found it imperative to take bold action to put our fare structure on a realistic basis. this we mean bringing it to a level at which the type of _.. it_ iio a jevei AL ujc serriee offered by our railroads Egyptian President Gamal Abdel Nasser will accept international- ization of the canal operation even though he would retain ship. reflect the costs of such serv- The statement was issued by Alfred EL and James __ __ _ _ iM. Prcs- S. proposal cnabpa ideals-of fte Central and of an international canal authority states the principles which the Pennsylvania. Other roads joining in the -4 m -T.-1 Vf J iUIL Uf bmtcd States nope w21 be trans- plication are Chesapeake and lated mto a new treaty tedng forever internafcona1 trol of the waterway. meat. You will want to read it. THREE FORMER Zanesville wood get all wrapped up in one of Bloodic's dress Potect Steve's kissin' cousin baseball players are doing the boys how to toss a long- well for themselves in the rnajorlhom Henry out the leagues these days. For an in-jpinking and Flattop formative ardde on the bcja hideout in an abandoned certain to sec the Times Signal are bat a few high- sports section. Latest baseball ilights you will find in the big coni- box scores and a wealth of sports of all sorts rounds oat the sports section. PILL TAKING can be 3 IF YOU ARE not now a sub- scriber to The Sunday Tiroes Sig- nal you can have it delivered to oas thing if it is a substitute forivoar door by simply telephoning 27 French Troops KiHed m Ambush Algeria ffl Three rebel ambushes within 25 miles KenfUCklOH Slain Norfolk and Reading 1 Seashore Pittsburgh and Lake Erie and the Reading Co. Leh5gh Valley and tha petition seek only an in- crease in basic coach fares. of this capital city have resulted in the deaths of 27 French sol-j diers and at least as rnanv I woimded or French aa Outside Tavern Ohio Andrew r FranUin thoritics said todav. also estimated J.' Uvcrn of Arab villagers rear Const a f tine were massacred Thursday in S terror Sheriff Richard _______________ tiwaite he w .through the heitd and the PARTY WTXS SEOUL Sj'ngman g0t Bush was dead on arrival at a the advScc of a physician. Ameri- GL giving your name and Rhce's Liberal pam- won 66 per Sstterthwaite said he address. For our w cans more than 400 tcnsaddress. For your weekend read- cent of the offices South Ko- for questioning. of nerve drugs and chose the Times' rea's local elections identified two of them Earf tablets every year. Rogrr Sonlheastern Ohio's larg- final rctums shonctl to Myers. and Joha 2JL 1 9 1 J.n topaotch best Sunday newspaper. I day. of   

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