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Zanesville Signal Newspaper Archive: August 30, 1954 - Page 1

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Publication: Zanesville Signal

Location: Zanesville, Ohio

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   Zanesville Signal, The (Newspaper) - August 30, 1954, Zanesville, Ohio                               THE ZANESVILLE SIGNAL MONDAY, ACTOR a. IKE ADVOCATES BIG MILITARY RESERVE it it it it it it it it it McCarthy Censure Probe Begins Tomorrow VenfetDue With Army Fawn Lake WASHINGTON McCarthy (R-Wis.) flew in today from Log Angeles to defend himself in a new Sen- ate investigation bf his on a prior Senate probe of his ac- tivities. McCarthy. pleading wcarta after the flight, declined to discuss the eases with a reporter. He was Sea, Me- toany be WASHINGTON 0 Cartfcy (aVWb) win Auhmmti the Senate's MOW UB which wB start here McCarthy saM ke to ready to toetify to Us kehaJf tke iBfrtry, if be to reqaeeted to do to. accompanied by McCarthy and Mr. and Mrs. Robert Vogeler. Vogeler is the American bus- inessman whom the Hungarian Communist government imprison- ed two years ago. A repporter asked whether Voge- ler will join McCmrthy'm Senate In- vestigation subcommittee staff or have any part in the lipai'ings. is Just a good the senator said. A special bipartisan committee headed by Sen. Watkins (R-Utah) planned a closed-door meeting later in the day to complete plans for the scheduled start totuoirow of public hearings on a resolution to censure McCarthy for what Sen. Flanders (R-Vt) has charged was conduct "unbecoming a senator" and tending to bring "disrepute" on the Senate. On another front, the three Democratic members of the Sen- ate Investigation! subcommittee sought to complete before a 5 p.m. deadline their minority report on ttoe McCarthy-Army hear- which ended last June 17. The subcommittee's four Repub- lican members already have filed their sealed majority views on If anything, was proved of the charges and countercharges McCarthy and top Army officials flung at each other under oath. The majority and iiiliunity find- Ings and separate opinions of in- dividual Republican and Demo- cratic senators win constitute the "verdict" The over-all document Is expected to be so bulky it may until Wednesday morning to print it for distribution. Before flying East last night McCarthy told newsmen at pUne- skfe he would meet today with the censure committee, but he eon- plained "the heailng it holding up our investigations of Reds and other undesirables in the defence Indwtrieiand services." McCarthy is regular chairman of the Investigations subcommittee. Sen. Mundt (R-SD) took orer Just for the McCarthy-Army probe. This morning's tbundershoweit brought .13 inch of rain, observers at municipal airport said. IIHUUUJ Mgh ef ft aft. eraooe. tost stamped to lew ef tke alrpeet early By it 71 dear sides and mild weather was the order of the day for most of the nation, but there were ex- ceptions. Temperatures were mainly in the 80s and 70s early today. The upper Mississippi Valley, however, had some brisk low 50s, and ther- mometer ranged in the 50s also in New Shoe Store To Locate Here Tfat MeMBt JleeJry Co. ot New York Cvbj has leased quarters at 51 North Fifth street and win es- tablish a Thorn McAn shoe store there, it was iced today. The property, OWMBJ by tfae Lfcad was former Ij Bsed as _ W i i a wanoouve anu H win pe remoo- efed by C W. Taylor and Sons, local TIM storeroom fc located tot put of a bolldkeg formerly by the Omar bakery to bouse tracks. It is adjacent to tfae Loan aad Savkngs Ox office. Tfae leeee wns irraajii by WO- Bateman of tae real estate GmCXNNATI body of Jack Gray, 3J, ef Dvtnft from tw Gray Friday French EDC Backers Ask Treaty Change Bill, the-tfaree-month-old fawn beats young Douglass Starr to the water. A pet of the six Starr children. Bill isn't caged in, but allowed to roam about south woods area at MonticeUo, N. Y. However, Bill has yet to miss a meal at home. Showers Bring Cooler Weather The mercury' was in the mid-TOs here today after brief thunder- storms early this morning. Fore- casters said the cool weather would remain cool tonight and tomorrow. upper New York State and New England. Missouri had some vigorous thun- derstorms which brought around a half-inch at rain to many sections and .83 to Columbia. There were half-inch showers 4n the northeast, and light showers in the far North- west GOP Chairman Pledges Fight CINCINNATI W-National Chair- man Leonard W. Han keynoted a Republican party campaign pep rally here today by accusing con- gressional Democrats of using "vast cunning" hi "to make our anti-Communist legisla- tion unworkable." Hall called on party committee- Report Awaited In Vice Probe PHKN1X CITY, Ala. (ft A dramatic new chapter in the tale of vice and corruption in fabulous Phenlx City unfoloeW today with a grand Jury report expected to con- tain more than 300 indictments. Special Judge Walter B. Jones called Circuit Court into session to FHCH1J1 CRT, Ala. receive the first presentment three weeks after the 18-man blue ribbon Jury began Its investigation of widespread racketeering. Picked yrams of National Guardsmen stood ready to arrest in tht .in- dictments, probably the greatest number ever returned by a grand Jury in Alabama. Until the arrests are made, the names of those in- dicted must remain secret. Muhiplt indictments against some of the gambling big shots were expecisd to. account for many of the anticipated 500-odd true As many as SO indict- ment! were believed likely against some. Still others may come later in the continuing vice cleanup. Spe- cial SoBcttor (Prosecutor) George (5. Johnson said the Jury would go and state chairmen affirm our standing palgn But be prepared far a "re- lo a initial report was filed. It was almost a foieguue con- clusion, however, that the first in- terim report would contain no in- ctoents for tfae murder of aoti- viee crusader A. L. Patterson, whose dectb on June 18 started here that the RepobB- cans are "not going to bang tip the gloves" la what President said was -'crncial strug- gk" for eoHrol of Is a possible of wtoat be bad ka mind. Ran said "no ragtag, bobtail of the len-wmg ADA far Democratic Ac- tion) persuasion to confute us with caDt for recognition of Red China and for the sdmMstra- tion's barrf-bttting program." Tne OOP chairman dM not spell it fata todtctmeat taHjr, but bto about maltiac anti-Comow- a saeeMsre to strip party of legal The Dnwcrats Ad not swcceed m Beusig Dnai MjorovM ot Tnetr to nsjsw nBnnber- k4 tfae party a srisnr The wvnpftQ tne party of legal Ma Sefke ffflot la bjiatai aa PARIS MP) The French National Aawmbly today in- terrupted debate on tfae Euro- pean Army Treaty today aft- er one of iti supportm inttet- ed on an immediate call for new to change the treaty. Tms move by the group in favor of the European Defense Commu- nity Pact immediAtekf brought a counter move by, the to shut off tfae debate and bory EDC wtthouf further talk. The morning session of the As- sembly was devoted exclusively to the questions of procedure. None IK the approximately CO orators wanting to talk about the treaty itself had a chance to speak. Under parliamentary rules, a 4e- daion on these motions must take SAN ANTOJOD. Tex. (ft An attorney for CpL Claude J. Bat- chelor said he wtfl tefl a general court-martial here today taat the Army "promised Batcbelor im- ntMHtty and then want back on te prom toe." Batcaetor'r trial opens today in a sheet-metal batkttag at Ft San Houston. Defense Atty. Jeei Westbrook of San Atnoaso said: "He is eager to clew himself with tfae American people." Batchelor. 33, of Kermit, Tex., is charged with collaborating with the and Informing on during SI months as a precedence over the rest of the debate. A truce was reached yes- terday ami both supporters and ad- herents of EDC agreed to with- draw their opposing motions to per- mit the general talks to proceed. This morning, the pro EDC group had a change of heart and the fisdlattoii celing for new tata with the other fire EDC nations was reinstated. So was the anti- EDC motion. Parliamentary experts were try- ing to figure out a solution. Both factions were working to line up votes for their side. The morion submitted by Alfred Chupin of the smau Union of Dem- ocratic and Socialist Resistance, says that there is reason "to in- vite the government to follow up its efforts, prior to the vote on the treaty, for an agreement among the signing nations on the basis ef the project of protocol submitted by France at Brusiels and to re- new with Germany the negotiations of the Saar." It proposed resum- ing the debate Sept. 21. The Assembly's foreign affairs committee, by a vote of 24 to 20, decided to recommend when thf assembly convenes this afternoon that it adopt the resolution by EDC foes to put off debate indefinitely. in treaty. Opening the treaty debate yester- day, Mendes-France maintained his on-the-fence attitude regardiag the European Defense Community Pact but he choked off several at- tempts to stall discussion and cleared the way for the pro-EDC faction to have its say. Former Premier Rene Mayer was the first to accept the chal- lenge with an urgent plea for adop- tion of the treaty. With 69 more speakers to be beard from, the de- bate is expected to last least until Wednesday. There appeared some chance that before voting to ratify or re- it it it it if Accused Yank t Faces Army Court Today of war fat Norn Korea. He CM ef H American wfao oeciasd to stay with Ost after tfae Korean ar- Bat be obanged bis mkeJ oame back to tfat Allied side ktst Jan. 1. The onty other American of the I who came back was CpL Ed- ward S. DtebeMoa of Big atone Gap, Va. He was convicted by a court martial last May 4 en charges similar to those brought against Batchelor. Of the other 21, one has been reported dead by the Chinese Westbrook said Batchelor and the other Americans were prom- Army at anpfll ankeaanok anankeag tfae ease on a oowniatnt tha Army "want bank am its promise." But tfae Army has feat it ttw ruMtaWtC only that tfaey would aot be pan- toned for remaining behind after other Allied bad been re- patriated. The Army has maintained that no immunity was promised for ac- of the prisoners while they in North Korean eempe. President Signs New Atomic effect, would kill the WASHINGTON leV-Prssedont D. senhower today signed the new atomic energy legislation and de- clared it win speed the time when the atom "will be wholly devoted" to peaoefai aarposes. The bill, which Ignited one of the hottest cnrsrreassonal fights ot the year, overnmub the IMt Atonic Energy Act. One of the changes permits the government, under certain security aafegaaros, to give nuclear to America's The new legUtetioM atoo, for the first time, opens the door for de- velopment of a private atomic power isidastry. within Jhe.Untted Elsenhower, in a statement, took note of the warm debate in Con- gress over these prorlslofts. He said he feels "some derstaniHngs" were revealed ing the debate, and added: "I want our people to know that these provisions are designed even- tually to relieve the taxpayer of the enoiiiKjus cost of the commer- cial aspects of the enterprise, while fully protecting the public in- terest in atomic energy: "In fact, these provisions carry Into effect'the policy declara- tion of the original Atomic Energy Act, that free competition in pri- vate enterprise should be strength- Elsenhower expressed confidence that the new measure will be a boon to public and private develop- ment of. atomic energy. It will tetd, he said, to greater national "Programs undertaken as a re- sult of this new law." the Presi- dent declared, "will help us pro- gress more rapidly to the time when this new source of energy win be wholly devoted to the con- structive purposes of man." Three Youths Seized After Crime Spree LUte fttrtf U.S. Defense Reviewed in Legion Speech WASHINGTON dent EbtctfktwW told American Leffen creation of a mighty reserve at a buhtarfc Legion Launches Big Convention WASHINGTON The Ameri- can Legion took over the nation's eapital today bands blaring and sjsruttng tkrough the bunting-decked streets. President Eisenhower flew back from his working vacation in Colo- rado to help launch this 3tth na- tional convention of the world's largest veterans organisation noon address. A member himself of the Abi- lene, Kan., legion post, Eisenhower sent an advance message of wtl- eome to the veterans yesterday. "Well do I know of your staunch dedication to in the time-honored, proud usage of the communion wfll be "a No, item" on big 1965 kftafettav program. "We have MM maintain that strong. tary in which we lieved tor 150 yean." dent declared Jh a speech tor delivery at the kgten's convention, "Now, at long last, we nsnit build such a reserve. And we mat maintain it. Wishful thtaktag political tintintty mutt ao taaaan bar a pregram so naeahmfr Jaoet Schnlcke, of Cincinnati, has found' the ultimate of thrllte, she thlnki. The 13-year-old ste- nographer hti taken up para- chute Jumping as a hobby. Pre- viously swimming, riding and flying lesions were her big mo- ments. She'i the only girl mem- ber of a parachute club. Heater Plant In Production Milton Stevens of Huntington Park, Calif., president of Republic Heater Corporation, was to arrive in ZanesvUle this after- noon to inspect the company's new plant on the day it went into pro- CLEVELAND youths duction. fsom Mentor-on-the-Lake were be- other company officials to be Mis. Hazel Bar- row. chief agent, and Mrs. Opal Mitchell, vice president bery there, Cleveland police said Iflit night. Officers said the three also ad- and general sales manager. Mrs mined holding up a Cleveland Wr Mitchell has been in this city for lastt July 10 and steatog five autos time ta tor the the unprecedented vice purge tne treaty, me Asaemoiy would ask Mendes-France to seek new concessions from the Cleveland and Lake County. They were identified as Charles Bradbury, 21, Da-rid Betl, If. and a IS-year-oM boy. According to police, they stoie three can in PainesviDe and one in Cleveland before entering the bar and taking from the proprietors. They ditched fourth car In a woods Youogstown when a TrumbuD. County sheruTs surpiiMd them, but stole another car nearby and escaped, police said. The gas station holdup was at "EnfiekL Mass., and netted about But they were caoght after they had accident mother stolen their eigMh, officers here of the plant which is located in the National Plumbing Supply company's property on Dearborn street. Inl Republic Heater received nationwide publicity last year calling attention to the fact that there an a number of women among its top executives. In addition to Mrs. Mnchefl and Mdw Barrow, these include Mrs. Nancy Martin, manager of service, and Mrs. Mary Panoo, rice president treasurer. menix city, wnere wtoe-open gam-bong and other rackets flourished for years. State aotborities dbeeting the search for Patterson's WDer ___ uaveu T ooBnvsnsQ nw Italy. Went Germany, Belgium, the Netherlands and Lux-emborug. Mendes-France failed to get the changes be wanted in his talks with the other five foreign ministers at Bruseeb earner this HOMMl DVM ml IfceM AUSTIN, Minn. Jay C. Hor-mri, tl, head of the C serge A. Hormei uwat packing firm, Aed early today foAowtof a long uV ness. Bormel, BOB of the fnomVf of m use Drm, nao. SVBIVIWJ raort VMB ______ a ynsr wtni neeor CLEVELAND Termer State Senator Marvin C who twice sought unsuccessfully the Democratic nomination for senator, dted of a heart Ont He was Zcmesvfle Physician Protests U.S. Tax Court Ruing If a torbfc can be flj Qkjf fctt Dr. ttmrrj C bey Place tfae lateraal street, has taken kss case to tfae Tax Chart of Use UJ., protest- mmtt agency's fata to deduct aa bis 101 tax nan aad am bei Ita retnra tor bto for tfae yeeji totalei 4adam in wtra Ms wife, Mrs. oentx regard bb) Therefore, be contends that he act owe me sAtttional tm income taxes the icicuue Mrriee to trying to eoOaet from bkn. The doctor made no protest adjasuneim bis dlrl- tocome made by the tax ke asks a redeter- bit tax bfll and s re- rerseJ of me agtrjej-'i refmal to coant Mi "telephone girl" M a he said. Something like legion- naires and members of their fam- ilies more than ever delegates brought wivM and efail- dren thronged Washington for the opening of the four-day con- vention, the first ever held here. The number is expected to to before it's over. It was the youngsters who made most of the noise, with rifles crackling in a firing squad contest within sight of the White House, and with drums rolling and bugles blasting in other competitions on all sides. Some of their elders did a little sential to our Then he said: "Establishment of an reserve an objective tor the American Legion and other pa- triotic organteaUjons have {ought lor a generation wS a No. 1 Hem sugmittad to tba next year." In his speech fellow naires, many of whom served aa- der him as supreme, oamaeaasss? in Europe during war IS, the chief executive "Tms reserve wfll not burden terved. men This who have administration w wtt whooping it up. Cowbells clanged in hotel lobbies. Picturesque mo- tor-locomotives of the 40 and 8. the legion's fun making offshoot, beeped and tootled. Mainly, though, the convention got off to a comparatively orderly start. National officials ruled out any sort of rowdyism. North Carolina Gets lirricane Warning MIAMI, Fla. Hurricane warnings were ordered up along the North Carolina coast rorth of tee to that" The Prertdent said that tot a cenniry and a half the States has prided itself "on MB re> fuMl to maintain large jr.illtary "We have relied. Instead, civilian soldier. But we done so without being fair eHbar to the private citizen or to the curity of the nation." He went into no detail about ftw  bodied young man to put fc a asV ttary service stint and then JstB the reserve. The White House st the time the program set forth as a plan to thwart Soviet aggressioH was onder by the National Council but that final had been reached on nhetbei ts> submit to Congress in that Eisenhower interrupted bta Wilmington to Manteo today as yEcatiori for tt boan to third tropical storm of the season, Carol, moved slowly northward with increasing winds now clocked at about 100 miles an hour. Storm warnings tor winds of less than hurricane force remained on display south of Wilmington to Charleston, S. C but Chief Fore- caster Gndy Norton in the Mi- ami Weather Bureau Mid the South Ouottm tionary. warnings were precau- At MANSFIELD. Onto (eV-Twenty- one Pennsyivama RaUroad freight cars left the tracks here today and tor a time blocked N. Main St. Railroad officials said one car jumped the i tuning the oth- ers to be derailed. one was in- The derailment easjsed a tempo- rary sfautdowB of part of the Ohio Co. plant whea one car crastscd into the cotnpnay's car- penter step, aa imaging tte air sys- tbe railroad back to Washington to legion. In hie address be akw France another prod the bone oC winning ratification of the Eutopn- SJi army project by that nation. Without mentioning that coobj by name, he said prsgrtea on At six-nation project "has not MoOnl our hojpes." He also declared that in the struggle for free world se- curity and peace, "neither tfae nor downs any of our efforts." Dealing with the European ation and coBectire sevuiHr eraUy, he said: "Tttt safety of any single in the free world on the substantial unity of al nctions in the free world. No outside the Iron Curtain affortf be hxUffeifirt lo the of any other nation devoted to (By Tta Bus tun, cloudy traffic wouM I Chicago, clear Thrnisga Mseanikl for cloudy days while are repaired. Denver, dear clear M M Miami. MEDINA, OMo Jmnefl. Mpto-St PaaL clear.....H ef Clinlaai kffled Orleans, whra a oar be WM riefef ka went j New York, rain......... V off tfae rota1 mflai ofiTorwn, dear ...........Jcf I 'Wasriaftoa, O.C, SPAPFRf   

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