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Zanesville Signal Newspaper Archive: February 21, 1953 - Page 1

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Publication: Zanesville Signal

Location: Zanesville, Ohio

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   Zanesville Signal, The (Newspaper) - February 21, 1953, Zanesville, Ohio                               SIGNAL Associated Press' Telephotof AP Wirephotot 89TH 238 ZANESVILLE. FEBRUARY 1953 FIVE CENTS 0 In Than Any Other Phone 2-4561 Refugees From Colorado Blizzard Five of the seven children who reached safety from their blizzard-trapped school bus at are shown here on the living room floor at the Merle Carey farm. The three boys slept on the while the girls shared a couch. 201 111 Airmen Saved From Reds WASHINGTON The Air Force said today that 201 United Nations brought down or forced to parachute behind enemy were rescued from the start of the Korean War in through last Jan. 31. In 78 other fliers were picked up from coastal around the-battle area by U. S. Air Force rescue units. The- Air Force said other downed airmen had been recovered by the Navy some had capture and escaped on The Navy said it was unable to 'i.J provide corresponding- figures. Colder Weather Due Tonight In Wake of Strong Winds Effects of Midwest Blizzard Felt Here With Mercury Expected to Dip to 12 Effects of a blizzard which has held the midwest in its grip for the last four days were being felt here today with shatcffed North Korea'have been by a special'helicopter detacffiifent _'Air_ mission malong. dangerous flights unto enemy ly protected by a offigHt- er in targets Janti- Sometifnes the men. savecl are wounded. There may be more than one to be picked up at a time. This means the helicopters often take off badly overloaded to flail their way back to safety. the detachment was quipped with Sikorsky H5 'cop- but after the need for bigger load-lifting capability was the newer and larger Sikorsky H19s were sent to' Korea. At sea and in rivers back of the enemy Air Force fliers have been using the Grumman SalG amphibian planes. The Air Force claims the record of rescues by the sea unit has been so good that fliers now try to ditch damaged planes in the water rather than make crash or controlled landings or bail out over land. Air Force officials say the high rate of rescue of U. N. 'airmen dcnvr.M in enmy territory explains why the Air Force discloses its own Josses of aircraft weekly instead of daily. Cleveland Slayer Is Put to Death COLUMBUS. O. GB-A Ocvdand man who poisoned -his sick wife ekctrocuted at Ohio Peniten- tiary Friday night.. Marvin Lucear. 3 died for the murder IS months ago of his wife. Ocie.-37. He pleaded Ralph Alvis said Lucear main- tained bo was innocent while in prison. Lucear did not say a word in the death chamber. The condemned man had no vis- itors on his last day. Alvis said. He ordered only water and a soft drink for his last but the warden sent him fried frcnch Tired hot ace cream and peach pie. Locear's mother. Ludic Lucear of East wrote Gov. Frank J. Lauscbe asking him to spare her sons's life. The governor said he would not inter- fere with the execution. BETGHTLEK WASHINGTON Reed high winds and falling temperatures. Forecasters at the CAA weather station airport said the mercury may dip to as low as 12 decrees here early' tomorrow. At noon the mercury stood at 32 degrees and was falling at the rate of six degrees every four hours. Wind' gusts which at times reached 50 miles an Cashed this shortly after the- 25 miles an hour were Recorded'at the airport later this mprnkig. Observers said a cold one of 'ttie' off shoots from the blizzard now heading into Canada from the nation's northern passed over here at '4 a. m. bring the drop in' temperature from yester- day's high lof 57 degrees. In 'the deep tornadoes lashed throe states leaving one person 10 injured and a mounting list of homeless. The heaviest toll was in Alabama where four communities were hit by destructive storms yesterday- Mississippi and Louisiana felt the fury in lesser degree. See Quick Action To Denounce Reds f WASHINGTON' con- gressional was 'forecast today Eisenhower's indictment-of Russia's mass jugation- of free through perversion of World War n agree- Recess Breaks Up Lias' Testimony WASHINGTON WV-A long week- end recess broke up today G. he got rich from bootlegging and gambling operations more years ago. The 52 year old W. race track owner is scheduled to put his 400 pounds back into the witness chair Tuesday for mere cross examination.-He is contest- ing in U. S. Tax Court a govern- ment claim he owes in back income interest penalties for 1542-48. and For days Lias testified concerning details of his activities which brought him wealth before he 30. TRUCKER KILLED O. H. Presley. 51 year old Columbus truck was killed in a traf- fic accident at a Columbus inter- section during Friday evening's rush hour traffic. Much Colder OHIO Srxrsv windy and much colder lowest 10-20. Sunday mostly cloudy and quite cold with snow flurries most- ly in north and east portions. Yesterday's High At 730 a.m. Todav At 1 p.m. Today THE WEATHER ELSEWHEKE By The FrcM Low' 47 rain 67 rain S3 ments. A sponsored by Ei- senhower1 and awaited on -Capitol Hill since he promised it in his Feb. -2 State of 'the. Union mes- was made public yesterday by the President. It rejects the Soviet Union's in- terpretation of the understandings those made at Yalta a license for the subjugation of free peoples. It proclaims a for ultimate self-government Dehind the Iron Curtain in line the pledge of the Atlantic The resolution was not as strong as some Republicans had but few seemed- inclined to chal- lenge the President on the issue. Most Democrats were ready to go along with too. It did not criticize the administration of Democrats Franklin D. Roosevelt or Harry S. nor did it repudiate agreements made at Yalta or elsewhere during those administrations. Democrats chuckled over the Republican Presi- dent's acceptance of the principles of the Atlantic authored by Roosevelt with British Prime Minister Winston Churchill. The Atlantic actually a joint of 'the two lead- ers. was composed of notes they greed upon aboard ship in the Atlantic Ocean in 1S11. They among other the rights' of all peoples to choose their own governments and agreed on restoration of self-gov- ernment for those who had lost it- The charter was never drafted as a formal document and had no legal although it caught on as a declaration of the west's principles. While Senate Majority leader Taft of Ohio arranged to handle the Eisenhower resolution in the most congressmen turned their thoughts to the apparently increasingly critical situation in Indo-china. France is carrying the fight against Communist Communist forces there. Two Federal Workers He On Counterfeiting Charges Advisors Urge New Agency For'Voice' Commission Wants Bureau Removed From State Dept. Advisory Commission on In- formation recommended to- day the Voice of America and all other psychological warfare and overseas intor- mation programs be placed in a new federal agency of labinet level. The advisory committee is a group of five distinguished citizens under the chairmanship of Mark A. director of the Yale Uni- versity of Institute of Human Re- lations. The proposal for removing the Voice and related activities from the State Department was one of seven recommendations which the commission placed before Con- gress in a report released through the department. It coincided with mounting crit- icism of the handling of Voice operations. The program is now investigated by committee headed by Sen. McCar thy Die 'commission's .fecommenda tion may have an influential ef tect on decisions yet to be made Eisenhower and-'Sec retaryj of-State fcDuller about the Heir to Dodge Fortune Weds Again Horace Dodge and Actress Gregg Shorxvood arc at Palm following their wed- ding yesterday. Groom's Mrs. Horace Elgin is at right. It was the fourth marriage for the second for Miss Sherwood. nformatJon psychological warfare -programs. The report came out as senators investigating the State Department officials on the carpet with for guarantees against any policies hampering the probe. One clash between the Republi- can-led committee and the new Republican administration of the State Department apparently end- ed yesterday in a senatorial vic- tory. Gen. Walter Bedell new under secretary of promised Sen. McCarthy and his senate investigations subcommit- tee today went after a similar pledge from Donold B. new under secretary of state for admin- istration. They summoned him to a closecf door demand- ing that there will be further against subordinates giving information to the subcom- mittee. At issue with Lourie is the case of John E. a special agent who contends he was demoted to a pavement-pounding job because of his contested reports on homosexuals and a suspected Communist have dis- appeared from the department's files. McCarthy has demanded Mat- son's reinstatement to his old job. McCarthy charged- yesterday hat the State Department was try- ing to his inquiries. He promptly summoned Smith to a closed door after which McCarthy and Smith announced agreement for They said Smith had never really ntended to issue an order author- izing staff members to refuse to testify before investigators unless a senator was and to with- iold official documents from the investigators unless a superior ruled otherwise. Young. Toft Expects To Get Envoy's Post CINCINNATI GV-Thc Cincinnati Enquirer said today in dispatch from its bureau that Wflliam Howard Taft ITT. son of U. S. Sen. Robert Taft. Truman to Write Memoirs for Life KANSAS Former President an bounced today he will write his memoirs and had -Delected Life Magazine to handle all In _ his first formal ference since he returned from the White House Mr. Truman said his memoirs will be published in one or two volumes. He also announced that Mrs Truman and their Mar- will go on a cruise to Hono- spending about a month there. Truman declined to state how much he would receive for his memoirs. He added he had re- ceived many offers and that he considered about a dozen of but said Life Magazine gave him the best offer. In a formal statement he said his memoirs will not bo published for two years in the belief that by 195-1 he will be able to speak more fully on the subjects per- taining to the role his administra- tion played in world affairs. have selected Life Magazine to handle all rights in the mem- Truman said. have ob- served that Life editors have pre- sented other memoirs with great dignity and Zanesville Team Draws Cambridge Zanesvillc wil1 play unbeaten Cambridge at o'dock Wed- nesday night in the opening of the Class A sectional basketball tournament in college gymnasium at New Concord. Tournament drawings were held today. City to Observe Holiday Monday Although Washington's birthday occurs on Sunday this Zancs- will observe the holiday VIonday when county.' state and federal offices close. Schools vill remain in session. There will be no mail other than special and the dcwrtovvn and Terrace postof- fices will be The state li- quor store will also be dosed that with the selective serv- ice office in the Richards banks and other financial institu- tions- John Mclntirc library and its _ Secrest to Honor First President Rep. Robert T.-Secrest of Scn- acting for the Ohio de- partment of the Veterans of For- eign will pay tribute Mon- day to preAident.of. the United Secrcst will lay a wreath at tVaahlnpton's tomb on the Mount Verrton estate jn Virginia. The ceremony marks the ob- servance of Washington's birth- day. Stock Brokers Hail Margin Cut NEW YORK CSV-Stock brokers and exchange officials voiced ap- proval today of the stock market margin cut to 50 per saying it will be good for business and ndustry in general. The Federal Reserve Board yes- terday reduced margin require- ments from 75 per cent.' The 25 per cent reduction means a return to the pre-Korean level. It was another move in the Eisenhower administration's program to get away irom direct government con- trols on the national economy. The board's be- comes effective when exchanges reopen on Tuesday after the three- day holiday week an- nounced after the nation's ex- changes closed for the day. But securities dealers reached or comment unanimously cheered the reduction. Volume of trading during the past week hit the daily average since the final week October. 1552. Reserve board officials in Wash- ington said the margin boost to per cent following the Korean in-j vasion was made for cal halt any impend- ing wild speculation. Brokers have argued that the government made' investors put down what amounted to a 75 per cent down payment on whereas buyers of autmobiles. TV sets and other consumer items ay make much smaller down pay- Democrats Back Spending Cuts WASHINGTON Demo craticljuombers .the r Senate Ap propriations Committee said they will- governmen spending but doubt the Republi cans.can balance the budget. Senators Maybank an Robertson said in separat interviews they are just as aruxiou as their GOP colleagues to whlttl the in'outlays for mer President Truman forecas for the year beginning July 1. Robertson think we ought to have a spending budget that balances re- but I don't think Congres will reach that goal even though we Maybank said Republicans can count on his vote to slice appro- priations bills. But he military' requests will have .o-be slashed about 10 per cen o make any reduction that will come close to balancing the budg- et I don't know what the attitude of the administration will be when t comes to reducing the Maybank predicted the Senate committee will wield a sharp knife foreign possibly re- calling some money already ap- propriated for that purpose. Truman for n new appropriations for foreign .ssistance. But Maybank said the Mutual Security now headed by Harold E. 'will be lucky if they get four Several senators said the com- mittee was less than enthusiastic aJbout the agency's foreign aid slans. as outlined to the commit- ee by Stassen recently. Dresden. Roseville East FuJlonham be closed and dated to be returned that day will be due on Tuesday in- stead. The auto license bureau here will also be dosed. Members of city council will hold their regular meeting on Monday evening for the holiday is not listed in the city charter specifying when meetings are to be held. Fire Damages Home At McConnelsville pcctcd to be the ambassador to The information was attributed to well informed source at The State 15 Other first round cloudy ss officials Friday ckar ............25 the condition of Maj. Gen. cloudy ..........75 S. World War U corn-1 clear .......25 maodcT of Ohio's 37th cloudy 79 greatly improved. TheJNew rai .........54 general suttercd a heart attack clear ...........51 Christmas lime. D. rain 61 Survey Ends Today -3 Today Die final 47 j TVCT.JC of the Community Survey 50 j of Fni out your bal- 23 lot from the In today's pa- found on 5. Dover vs. Carroihon at 9 Damaged by Smoke. UhrichsviUc vs. Is Closed Philadelphia at o'clock Thurs-j day and vs. NCTT 0. shocton at 9 o'clock Thursday. Seme 200 nearby Port Finals will be played Friday with the Dinners ad- vancing to tr.e district tournament SL Gairsville week. the has wori 20 straight while Zancsville has a rec- ord of Jive victories and 13 de- feats. 1 school children arc getting an un-Jstory expected vacation after a base-1 moncd lo Tbc which apparcn'Jy started from a faulty flue caused damage estimated at 51.000 this mornL-ip to the home o' Mr. and Mrs. Francis Kraps of South Eichth street The blaze was discoA'cred by Frederick Krap5. when he to the basement of The two frame sum- his parents who in turn merit fire Thursday night caused 'called the M and M volunteer fire extensive smoke damage in their school. department Tho fire had gained 'Jerry Baird said 5t may headway wehn firemen arrived take two weeks to clean it up.land it damaged the interior of the Cause of the blaze not and much of the household mmed. 'goods before being extinguished. To Propose Bonus For Korean Vets CLEVELAND bill to give Korean War veterans a. bonus reaching up to as much as 5400 will be offered io the Ohio Legis- lature next week. Rep. Hay T. Mil- ler Jr.. said today. The measure would finance the bonus a bond issue of million dollars. The payments would be similar to the borxis voted in for veterans of the Second World War. This financed by' a bond issue of 300 j The Cuyahoga County son of the county's Democratic proposed Ohio citizens be given 510 a month for service in country since June 1950. 515 a month for foreign in- cluding European and a month for Korean combat duty. Second World War vets got month for domestic service and 515 a month for overseas duty. Republican legislative leaders were reported cool to the bill on the ground it would be too expen- and that any bonus action should await end of the hcstilit- in Secret Service Charges Pair Printing Bills WASHINGTON. w Secret Service announced arrest today-'of two -Depart- ment of employes on charges of bills. The two were identified as tin T. of Oxon near the District dary line and Mary Washington.. U. S. Secret Service said Storey is 'sin admlnis- trative officer in the1 Jr'.V- division riculture and Miss Watson' is clerk in his office. Storey has been 27'years'with government and Miss Watson Baughman said- Secret Service agents found four copper engraved to make J10 a ing press and 'other necessary to cabin owned by Storey oh tuxcnt River. _ Baughman added that these finds Storey plates and running off HO notes. 'Storey first provement'so run without .attempting any of the bills. Allies Base Near Yalu Alii bombers blasted' a CommunistV- coVimunications- center south bank of the dary of Manchuria today-V 'and -r' screamipg U.S. Sabre two MIG-15s. f The U. S. Fifth Air ported three other MIG's ably were destroyed and'two y m The raid the comnnm- ications center at. Manpojin one of two heavy strikes day the swing Sabres. earlier pounded big Red -supply area'north of apex of- the old ''Iron on stbe Korean Central Front. V Assessment of gun camera fflm rrorn the Air Force -boosting thej figures 'J 'rom an earlier announcement of two destroyed one damaged. There were two dog- The second dogfight resultetl vap- parently from MIG's rising Jicir base at 130 air miles southwest pojin. to challenged Sabres shield-' mz the fighter-bomber raidL Red military yongyang. Korean Commxxnist were hit by heaviest -V B29 raid of the year. perforts dumped ISO-tons of n the Sopo Lost Trails A once rnirtly hlxbiny the nation Is o and blocked fiDca Across this travel men who hare trmm np In a nrined have teen civfllxaUon. That b a situation In a treat novel of the fotcre EARTH ABIDES' By George R. Starts Monday la The   

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