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Zanesville Signal Newspaper Archive: January 19, 1951 - Page 1

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Publication: Zanesville Signal

Location: Zanesville, Ohio

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   Zanesville Signal, The (Newspaper) - January 19, 1951, Zanesville, Ohio                               THE ZANESVILLE SIGNAL Associated Press Telephofos Wircjifiofos 87TH 211 ZANBSVILLE, OHIO, FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 1951 FIVE CENTS HELLO... tm't imr telephone muntif WV i- ECONOMIC CHIEF OUSTED lew Witness i Crime Probe day Be Cited Former Convict Refuses to Answer Committee Questions CLEVELAND (A') A uat former convict, who po- c said was sent to Youngs- to help organize the ckets, bluntly refused today describe his business to the late crime committee. [Tie witness, Joe Dl Carlo, 52, said: 'I refuse to answer the ques- n the end of his testimony mmlttee Chairman Sen. Estes fauver (D.-Tenn.V said he iuld recommend that "appro- ate action be taken against 11." 31 Carlo thus became the sec- i witness of the three-day nrlnf: In Cleveland to hear ,m the senator that "action" neanlng contempt proceed be taken. Phe final witness last night [red (Big Al) Pollzzl. was told same thing because he re- ied to answer questions about i activities prior to 1945. Po- ti, a former Cleveland boot [ger. now Is a real estate oper >r In Miami. Fla. Police Chief Edward -I. Al- ii of Youngstown yesterday stifled Dl Carlo formerly raded the rackets In Buffalo, Y.. and came to Cleveland because the heat was on." Je told the committee that Dl rlo was advised by Cleveland ckcteers to go to Youngstown about to help organize rackets there. 3i Carlo previously" had ived six years at Atlanta pen! ntlary for Intimidating a gov nmrnt witness. Today., however, lie told com' ittre Investigators he was orent of the Intimidation large and did not know any Ins about the events that re ilted In his conviction. The short, heavyset witness andly admitted that he has id no legitimate business since 38. when he said he was In the Hiding machine business. Then he caught himself and iid. "Well, I was In Jail a few Vou might rail that legltl ate." Questioned about his flnancla andlna at present he said he vned no home, no property and s net worth was "zero." nut then .loneph NellK committee Inveiitlgator. inked him if he owned an au- nmohlle. replied Carlo. "What "A Cadillac." Chief Allen had told the com ilttee that Dl Carlo was one o croup of muscle men who hat irced bookies t ay 50 percent kickbacks. Thn sheriff of Lawrence coun O. admits that his campaign innagcr in the election of 194 a onetime attorney for a ambling casino. The attorney. Sheriff Peter A lurke told the crime commltte esterday, was II. M. McCowan 1'y solicitor of Ironton. O. (Law enre Burke snld Me once represented the nov casino. Colony club, a O. "He gave me some money ny he went on "II ntiM have raised the mono omewhere. I don't know where didn't nsk." kk Holt, Veteran Actor, Dies HOLLYWOOD WV- Death ha Jack Holt, 62. hard-rid nc cowboy of both the open an ne cinema range. He succumbed last nlcht at th hospital In West Lo to coronary thromhosl? 'r had suffered three sever I'nrt attacks since shortly be "re Christmas. p Unit was moved yestenla his apartment In the Mlra hotel In Santa Monica he had lived for severa His personal physician Rr. Mnrvln Mack, said the ve actor was gravely ill. ra 'M fnr n fow days, and the another attack yeste "l< Tim. also actor with him nlmo rfurtng his lust Air Force General Proposes Jse of A-Bomb Against Reds Soldier, 14, Is Frostbite Victim of Korean Fighting BATTLE CREEK. Mich A 14-year-old soldier casualty of the Korean war is in Percy Jones army hospital here suf- fering from frostbite. He Is Pfc. James B. Byrd. of Craig Beach, O., in Mahon- Ing courtly near Youngstown. Byrd. big for his age and so eager to get into the fighting that he falsified his age to gain "army acceptance, fought his way up the west coast of Ko- rea with the 7th Infantry regi- ment of the 8th army before the fingers of both hands and a toe on his left foot froze. Hobbling around in Korea, he grabbed up and placed aboard a hospital evacuation plane which arrived here yes- terday. "Wanted to get in the army since I was eight." James beamed to reporters. "Tried three times before I made It, though. Finally a recruiting sergeant In Ohio, believed I was IS like I said. He signed me up last June 9." James was pretty proud of a birth certificate his mother got for" him while was trying to Induce him to get out of the Turn to Page Eight Maj. Gen. Emmett (Rosle) O'Donnell, back from Korea to head the strategic 15th air force, urged yesterday In California that use the most effective weapon against Red A- bomb." (AP Wlrephoto) WASHINGTON The as- sertion by Maj. Gen. Emmett (Rosie) O'Donnell, on his ar- rival from Korea In Cali- fornia, that the A-bomb should be used on Red China aroused private speculation here about his future. His declarations Immediate- ly recalled that the last air general who ventured Into the Held of International policies Is now retired. Gen. Orvll Anderson got involved last summer in the debate about preventive war. He told reports that If he was ordered to. "I can break up Russia's five A-bomb nests In a week." When Anderson said that, he was command- ant of the air war college at Maxwell base, Ala. Vanden- Turn to Page toy, 13, Slain; vlotive Sought CRETE, 111. chool boy. slain for no appar- nt motive, after he was abduct- d on Tuesday, was thrown from in automobile In a residential trcet late last night. After his abductors tossed the joy's body Into the street they Irove away shouting: "Well, so ong. The boy, Billy Rodenberg, had Jieen missing since late Tues- lay. He was last seen going to Taft Would Limit Troop Transfer WASHINGTON (3V- The ate appeared headed -today to- ward a vote late this month ap- proving the use of American forces to bolster western Europe's defenses. An Indication by Senator Taft R-Ohlo) that he will support the ransfer of a limited number of divisions when available took ils home in a trailer camp south f this small northern Illinois ommunlty 35 miles south of Chicago. An intensive search had been made for the slight. In-spec- tacled boy, an eighth grade pupil In Crete community high and public school. Dr. W. Hugh Miller. Will county coroner's physician, said he hoy had been dead from 8 o 12 hours before he was toss- ed from the car about _ clock last night. Millers a Hd fingerprints and discoloration on [he boy's neck Indicated that he had been strangled. There also was a deep bruise on his right Jaw. Dr. Miller said the condition of Billy's eyes Indicated his abduc- tors may have blindfolded him. Miller said an examination o: the body disclosed no sexual at- tack. Young Rodenbcrg was about 5 feet tall and weighed 79 pounds. Sheriff Ernest Overby of Wil county said authorities had found no motive for the slaying of the boy. He added, however a local crime." starch out of opposition to a move 'resident Truman has said he will make If necessary without Red Cross Agreement Ignored by Enemy DALLAS, Tex. Reds and North l.fl Chinese Koreans have Cloudy refused to recognize Red Cross and Its International prls oncr-of-war agreement, a high Red Cross official declared. James T. Nicholson, executlvi vice president and general man ager of the American Red Cross, said yesterday stockpile of prisoner-of-war boxes of food clothing and medications are now In Tokyo and Yokohama. He said they will be sent to prls- oners If the Reds ever honor the agreement and "we can be as- mired they will get to the rightjToday's a.m. persons." Split Seen In UN Ranks Asian Countries Favor New Appeal LAKE SUCCESS Non Communist members of the United Nations faced a split In their ranks today on the question of condemning Communist Chi- na'for aggression in Korea. Twelve Arab-Asian countries, contending Helping's latest "non" to a U.N. peace bid dlt not say called an emergency caucus to consider still another appeal. Any such proposal they may adopt will run head-on Into U. S. demand the U. N. de- nounce Red China aa an ag- gressor and take appropriate measures against It. U. S. Delegate Warren R. Aus tin, In a stinging denunciation o the Pelplnc regime yesterday demanded .the world organiza tion face iacts and condemn th Communists. He gained only lukewarm sup port from Australia, Britain, Be! gium.'and France, who pleade for time to study the question India opposed the U. S. plan These preliminary views, ex pressed by countries generally closely associated with the Unit cd States, led diplomats here t doubt the effectiveness of an; resolution condemning Pelplng. The U S. hopes to have enoug co-sponsors to Introduce such resolution In the 60-natlon polltl cal committee today. There seemed little question but that I would be adopted. However these diplomats said, the prel mlnary bickering, backing an filling will certainly lower an moral effect it might have or Russia and Communist China. they become much of the approval. Most Democrats apparently avor committing ground troops o the proposed international army and many Republicans have indicated they regard such L move as Inevitable. However. Taft made It plain he believes congress should put a celling on the number of foot noldlern to he dispatch- ed. This promised to provide another controversy. Taft would not say what he thinks the celling should be. Most speculation has placed country's contribution at from five to ten divisions. Combat Bonus Pay Requested WASHINGTON LP The de- fense department asked con- gress today to grant combat bon- us pay of to monthly to troops fighting In Korea. Legislation submitted by the department provides the addi- tional monthly for enlisted men and the extra for offi- cers If they fought the en- emy at least six days in any month.. WASHINGTON WV-: A reiolu tlon calling on the United Na tlons to brand Communist Chin an aggressor in Korea wa blocked temporarily in the hous today after a Republican mem ber attacked It as equivalent t a declaration of war. The resolution was introduce Democratic Leader McCor mack of as statement of bipartisan forelg policy. Not His Best Smile TRUMAN Movie Czar Gets Top Job in ESA Valentine Quits In Dispute Over Price Control Methods WASHINGTON Economic Stabilization Admini- strator Alan Valentine has resigned and will be succeeded by Eric Johnston, president of the Motion Picture Associa- tion on America. The White House announced today President Truman has ac- cepted Valentine's resignation and named Johnston to take over. Valentine quit, at the presi- dent's wish, as a result of what he called an "honest differ- ence of opinion" with as- soclaten over Ilie "precise tim- ing and methods" for the In- troduction of overall price and wage Johnston not only will have authority over prices and wages aut general supervisory authori- ty over all economic- aspects of mobilization including rent con- trol. Installment credit and re- strictions on housing finance. He Is taking a nine months leave of absence from his .post as president of. the motion pic- ture association. He told reporters at the White House that his length of service as economic administrator Is not necessarily limited to that peri- od, however. Johnston, former president of the U. S. chamber of commerce, has been conferring with Charles E. Wilson, chief of the office of ERIC JOHNSTON defense mobilization, for several days. It had been reported ear Her he would become a special adviser to Wilson on economic matters. Wilson, who attended the news conference at the White House, said a decision on whether to apply across-the-board wage and price controls 6V selective controls will not be determined until after Johnston has been an dppo'rTafffly to survey Allies Again Enter Won ju 1 John L. Lewis. United Mine Workers chief, smiles after he signed new wage agreement in Washington. When photographer asked for "great big smile." Lewis replied, "I am happy, but not that happy." (AP Mild Weather Continues Here A moss of tropical air kept temperatures in the mid 60's here today and U also prevent- ing a severe cold wave over the northern tier of midwest states from pushing south, federal fore casters said today. U will be cloudy here tonight with low temperatures ranging from 45 to 50 they said. There may be some rain tomorrow. mercury soared to a springlike GO degrees here yes tcrday and dropped to 49 during the night. This afternoon It had climbed to 65. Mrs. Wickens Is Women's Civil Defense Chief Here Rather cloudy tonight. Low 45-50 south. Saturday most- ly cloudy. Colder central and north portions. Some rain like- ly central south and rain or snow extreme north Saturday afternoon or nlpht. Yesterday's High fifl.O'' service. Mrs. Hester Wickens, principal of Mclntlre elementary school, has been appointed co-ordlnator of women's activities In civilian defense for Zancsvllle. The appointment was announc- ed today by Cecil Daniel, the city's defense director. Mrs. Wickens, who Is presi- dent of the Business and Profes- sional Women's clubs of Ohio, has been active In civilian de- fense planning on a state-wide basis. Last summer, she conferred on the subject with Col. Wllllm E. Warner, state director of ci- vilian defense, and Adjutant General Leo M. Kreber. Mrs. Wickens pointed out to- day that no separate women's organization is planned. "It U my she explained, "to In- tegrate the women Into the reg- ular program." She pointed out that women are qualified to handle about 50 percent of the Jobs in civilian de- fense. She mentioned warden service and health service, which Includes sanitation, public health and emergency medical MRS. HESTER WICKENH crs, for dispatching duties, for the patrol of vital areas and in some phases of fire defense, as well panic control service. They will also be used to man observation posts and warnlni stations and to handle evacua tlon set Likewise Irr.por tant among their duties will be ____ ___ Also, women ean be used as to educate the public In prcpara Today ..........56.0' automobile and ambulance driv-ltlon for poMlMt the whole situation. .Wilson added, however, tha feds' Victory :asy in Tibet ON THE' TIBETAN INDIAN FRONTIER W) Tibetan offl- ial said today Invading Chinese Communists won their big vie ory In Tibet without firing a hot using fireworks and psy- chological warfare. This official, who reached In- dia after accompanying the Da- ai Lama on his flight Lha- ia. said Tibet virtually lost the war when her strongest fortress at Chamdo. near the "Tibetan Chinese border, capltulntcd in he first days of the Chinese in- vasion early last October. "The Chinese won this victory without firing a single shot from a real gun." official said. used skyrockets and oth- er fireworks to turn night into day and to permit Tibetan offi- cers and troops to see fear on each others' faces. In a few tours, all the officers, including he commanding general, Nga Beu. fled: but they were cap- ured by Red patrols." After their first exposure to the Chinese fireworks, the Ti- betan captured at Chamdo received such kind treatment at the bf their enemies, the official that they voluntarily sent to reporting "It Impossible to defeat the Com- The official said Nga Beu's message urged Immediate capit- ulation of Tibet to the Reds. "It threw the entire capltol in- o he said, "and has- ened the preparations to give Johnston's appointment woulc tend to speed up a decision on the question of controls over small or large segments of the economy. The shift occurred at a lime when Wilson was pressing for the fastest possible action on freezing prices and wages. Val- entine and his advisers at ESA had contended they are not suf- ficiently staffed and organized to administer a freeze. Wilson Is reported to want ceilings applied within a week, but after two days of confer- ences with former OPA chiefs, there reportedly' was general agreement to delay action some- what longer probably until early February. Admiral Backs Youth Training WASHINGTON Admiral New Red Attack Still Awaited TOKYO UP) A United Nations prowl force reoccu- picd the ruined and aban- doned road-rail hub of Wonju today without meeting any opposition. -_ 1 ._ Two air-supported -Allied at- tack regiments on another sec- tor of the snowclad east-central Korean battlefront killed 1.000 Reds and routed the remainder of their strong force In a tlnulng fight. A big Red offensive effort was still expected to break out all across the at any time. Allied patroU have been en- tering and leaving Wonju, the- key traffic junction In central Korea, since, the V. S. second division withdrew Tuesday from a looping line two miles south of the town. Only civilians were on hand to watch the reinforced patrol re- enter Wonju Friday. The two U. N. attack regi- ments normally men smashed a large enemy force seven miles southeast of Yong- wol, onvthc eastern end of the war front. "We put the enemy on an officer said tersely. The fight started Thursday and was still raging today. Forrest P. Sherman testified to- day "unless international condi- tions It probably will be necessary to Increase the na- tion's fighting forces above pres- ent goals of close to persons. Sherman, top ranking navy of- ficer and a member of the Joint chiefs of staff, gave this "per- sonal opinion" to the senate pre- paredness sub-committee. At the same time he gave full support to the administration's new universal military service and training bill It would lower the draft age from 19 to 18 year old and lengthen required service from 21 to 27 months. 33 miles northeast allied-held highway he Dalai Lama decision fall powers." was made to abandon Lhasa and move the 16- year-old Dalai Lama close to the Indian border to escape capture by tho Chinese, said the official. The Dalai Lama, with a small group of officials, fled over the Icy plateau through the forbid- ding Himalayan to a tem- porary capital at Yatung. near the Indian frontier. Workers Overcome By Chemical Fumes DADE CITY, Fla.   -.m ciated Press correspondent, re- ported persons were "lying all over the place In halls, floors, She aald doctors were working over them. Extent of the Injuries not known. First reports Mid a workman dipped a wet cloth Into the tank and it exploded. Burglars Again Loot' Duncan Falls Places Burglars last night'broke Into Hartman's grocery. Huff gro- cery, link's Place cafe and the Russell r'ltz filling station Duncan Falls, It was reported to- day. Deputy sheriffs are In Duncan Falls Investigating the wave of burglaries the second reported there since the first of the year. Earlier this montn the Huff grp- ifJHl cery.'Tlnk's Place and the Ice. station were burglarized. I I .i 1 i Smoke snd quickly filled There was no estimate of the the sectloniztng plant Ifrutt cut Into whereiamnunt of merchandise taken In 'last night's burglaries. T. i _ v f f' X.   

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