Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Zanesville Signal Newspaper Archive: April 16, 1946 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Zanesville Signal

Location: Zanesville, Ohio

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for Liking us on Facebook

  • We are retrieving your image from the archive...

  • We are converting your image into tiles...

  • Almost done...

   The Zanesville Signal (Newspaper) - April 16, 1946, Zanesville, Ohio                        THE ZANESVILLE SIGNAL Associated Press NEA >1P 82ND 297 ZANESVILLE, 0., TUESDAY EVENING, APRIL 16, 1946 FIVE CENTS Prints the News Tells the Truth War Controls Marshall to Seek N KJ P Slapped Onto New China Truce UM r Off A ion on Red Scarce Foods More Butter Seen As Effort Is Made To Untangle Snarl WASHINGTON The government mapped a new attack on the snarled food situation today involving butter, bread, meat and black markets. Wartime controls were slapped hack in an pffon to spur butter, production and stabilization direc- tor Chester Bowles foresaw a "real improvement within the next 60 days" on this front. The senate agriculture commit-! ;pf called for more details on fac- :ors dislocating meat distribution and OPA and the agriculture de- partment moved to restore other- v.aitime controls on slaughtering; v. iih the aim of spreading avail-: able suplies more evenly. j A potential bread problem had; members of the senate small bus-! mess committee seeking ways of; meeting famine relief quotas for, overseas without impairing the nation's flour supplies. Baking in- dustry spokesmen told the mittee yesterday that, if these sup- plies fall 25 percent below last vear. government bread rationing 'or black markets in food are; probable. The move for butter production, uas bracketed with OPA action: 10 keep consumers bills at their! present levels for milk, butter.1 rhecse and other dairy products. A program of larger subsidies for dairy farmers was announced yes- terday to compensate for higher feed and labor costs. i On butter, the OPA j at overcoming situation which had made it more prof- itahle use butterfat for ice cream and other products than j fnr butter. Accordingly, the j wartime ban was restored on i the of whipping creain and restrictions were placed on the amount of butterfat in ice cream. The program also includes price ceilings for the first time on cream used in bakery products and ice- cream. Leonard E. Hurtz of; Omaha, chairman of the Dairy! Industry committee, contended in, statement that the new pro- gram would lead to a decline in! in ilk production "and continued shnnago-" of dairy products. The Senate Agriculture commit- tee was plainly exercised about the meal situation which Packer James D. Cooney testified was a "national scandal which makes prohibition look iike petty crime." With the FBI ordered into ac- tion against one group of black marketeers, there were hopes of curbing some illegal transactions in meat, hut opinions differed sharply whether the reim.position of slaughtering control? would flchievr it? aim of improving the general meat situation. Price Ad- ministrator Paul A. Portpr said the effect of the controls would br to "provide for better distri- bution of mnat supplies at ceiling price; to retail stores." Secretary of Agriculture saftl it meant "in reality a share-lhe-livesiock pro- gram." The opposite view was taken by Oon'-y. vice president of Wil- MANCHURIA V y yKungcliulmj Plea to Dro Iranian C Senate May Delay Action On Draft Bill General Tries in Vain Prefabricated Hangar for ONG Use Here The American-equipped Chinese 1st Army crashed through Com- munist defenses at (1) in a race to reach Chang- chun, Manchurian capital reported occupied by Chinese Conimun- Earlier reports had said the 1st Army was retreating in bitter fighting at Chanjrtu (2) and Communists had sent addi- tional troops to Szepinnkai from "Cooling Off' Period Seen For Measure A "cooling off" period in the Senate appeared in store today for the chopped-up' draft extension bill, along with its companion pay boost measure. Senate leaders indicated an in- clination to do nothing for at least; a week about the two pieces of: General Marshall, recognizing the urgency of the yesterday by the! churian fighting tomorrow will fly direct from Tokyo to House. Peiping, the Sino-American truce headquarters, to again Wnat they would do then Manchurian Fighting Takes on Appearance Of Civil War as Reds Occupy Capital (By The Assouiaied After an unsuccessful effort to obtain a pre-fabricated hangar for erection at the municipal airport. Adjutant General Donald F. Pancoast disclosed today that it had become necessary "to scratch Zanesville from the list" of cities being considered for an Ohio National Guard air unit. This city's airport facilities had been considered excellent for the unit, which was to include 25 P-47 fighter planes and a half-dozen sen-ice craft. However, lack of hangar space became an insur- mountable obstacle after General Pan- coast applied in vain to the army for one of the prefabricated type for use here However, there was still a chance for Zanesville, inasmuch as the state has not yet found a sufficient number of fields which meet the U. S. army's require- ments for hangar and repair shop space. In the event that it becomes neces- sary for the government to construct buildings, it is believed that the local air- port will receive serious consideration. A survey undertaken by The Signal disclosed that there are more than 50 qualified pilots in Zanesville and immedi- ately surrounding territory, and almost all of them have expressed interest in ONG air force service. 8 Delegates Opposing Soviet Move Gromyko Charges U. S. and Britain Don't Want Accord It's a Snooperscope Ohio Power Buys More Coal Land special envoy to China, cancelled an important conference with Chi- nese Premier T. V. Soong in Shang- hai to go direct to the truce head-1 quarters city. There he will meet the impo- tent Sinn-American committee of substitutes for all three original not had authority to carry out iti as- Property in Meigs and Rich Hill signed mission of affecting a truce -township, totaling acres, has between battling Chinese govern- been acquired by R. C. Slack, as mem. and Communist forces. He'trustee, it was revealed today jeffected both military and politi- through realty transfers on file 'ca! truces last January, but neith- at. the county record ier was put into effect and shortly slack, it, is u iafter he went to Washington for sents the Ohio 'conferences, the situation wors- properties w- ;ened. icoal. i Marshall's decision to fly to Peiping was made after the No. 2 Chinese Communist lead- er. Gen. Chou En-Lai, called the fighting in Manchuria full scale civil war. Both Marshall and Chou were original mem- bers of the committee of three, along with Minister of War I Chen Cheng, who is ill. Mar- shall conferred with MftcAj- thur in Tokyo today. There was a visual news black- but presumably caused by poor from Manchuria today. However. Associated Press cor- respondent Spencer Davis radioed 'from Mukden that the situation !in embattled Changchun, the Man- churian capital, was so tense that anything like the House Iwith its five-month "holiday" on i inductions and a ban against draft- iing teen-agers. i Chairman Elbert D. Thomas 'D-i jtitah) of the Senate military mittee told reporters he thought! Kep. P. W. Griffiths of the Ohio 15th district was one of 11 Ohio congressmen to vote against the draft extension bill Rep. Brehin of Lo- Rep. McGregor, Co- also voted against it. A real esta no reached be strip; The iarate hing" would be to t law as is until ar. littee has recom- ie-year extension it has evidenced vith' the House the War depart- the House action, ney are hopeful of 'measure in the Sen- arly disturbed by the inductions, army can't meet its mar- needs if that restrictionj _. J 111 I-flG Dill. p' d b vote 290 ors of the Senates m theJHouse bill extends the hope roday the.draft ]aw unti, next February 15 out a wage any inductions be- itween May 15 and October 15. Af- that date thev mav be resumed a neutral plane probably would be provision added to ,heir! sent, there to remove five upnder union doiliands. can one a woman. n th cpnatmx Taf. ip.r, and Spain Fears Red Invasion Frontier Incidents Seen Excuse Latest news from ;Said Communists, attacking from Commi-ion Rv- ivci.i ;three directions, had captured mond M ,ha, ,hp amsnd_ Changchun's three airfields. :ment would slow FHA insurance: The official Chinese central small nonies. on the condition that voluntary enlistments fail to meet army and inavy needs. Advocates of the holiday plan! Wire photo This is a snooperscope, fitted over a special helmet, in position used by American soldiers starting in the summer of 1944, to enable them to see almost as well by night as by day. The device, using the infra-red ray principle, permits sighting of objects clear- ly even on blackest nights, the army says. The snooperscope, along w-Jth the sniperscope, a rifle-mounted device of similar func- NEW YORK The United Nations Security Council today postponed ac- tion on Russia's proposal for dropping the Russian-Iranian case and adjourned until to- morrow with three delegates demanding immediate consid- eration of Poland's charges against Franco Spain. Dr. Quo Tai-Chi, chairman, an- nounced the council would meet at 3 p. m. tomorrow. He did not state what would be taken up then. But France, sia and Poland joined in asking immediate consideration of the 'Spanish case. LONDON The Ma- Poland h a s charged Franco drid radio expressed fear that sPain wijh endangering world v. _ peace and with harboring Nazi Russia was planning to in- doing research on new Vade Spain as the F r a n CO weapons in this atomic age. government awaited replies Eight delegates lined up yea- today from five "friendly" terday and today against Bus- ?ia's the councU immediately strike the Rus- sian.iraniBn case from its agenda. Russia and Poland stand together These charges, together with arv '-he Russian move. assertion that Spain was harboring The eleventh nation on the cou-n- German scientists, were made by: cil, France, presented this morning Oscar Lange, the Polish delegate tola compromise proposal designed, to the United Nations Security Secretary General Trygve Lie cil. The council is scheduled to obtain complete information on the take up the Spanish question as: case for the council's report- .10 soon as it disposes of. the Russian- j the general assembly which meets Iranian dispute hero Sept. 3. This would have the The Spanish foreign ministry an-j the case off nounced last night it had extended! d.oc.ke.tu the formal invitations to five coun-1 nanded lhe cil members which m a i n t a i n sslnf bt "friendly relations" with the Fran- co government on Its aSenda- He noted co government. cound, had declared a dispute The countries are the United ,existed, that the governments had States, Britain, Egypt, the Nether-: announced an agreement and that lands and Brazil. Iran nad witndrawn the case. The Madrid radio said there was The council referred the Lie a secret agreement between France; memorandum to its committee of and Russia which might lead to a experts for a report within two Soviet march through France and days. This could bring the matter into Spain. The existence of any up again on Thursday. such agreement was promptly de- Dr. Quo will be replaced tomor- nations invited to send tech-! mcians to investigate charges; that Spain is a threat to world Peace. ii.i. yjL titc auufjc,  as- Therr. was no radio or tele- er cost if the provisions were today the war department 'graphic communication with out. -is responsible for what he termed Changchun from Mukden, Davis reported. al Union of Mine, Mill and Smelter lost f.hc coin he said we see Samf workers (CIO) patrolled Butte C'Od searching m darkened corners !pleading with crowds nf a modern- slnful world Senator: McLeod group WASHINGTON Secretary rie- .-ed any invitation from Spain to send in- vestigators into that country. The Spanish foreign ministry an- SUmfng the debate against Russia's fot.nounc_edjast_night to drop the Iranian case Lie's memorandum was referred to the commit tf? of experts for m report on it. within (wo The main points of Lie's memorandum were: 1. The council had made na finding that a dispute actually existed. 2. In view of this the only possible action xvas to order an investigation under the char- ter. This had not been done. 3. Iran has asked thc council to drop the complaint, Edward R. Stettinius, Jr.. re- 1 tiovs and women broke Council President Gets Gavel James E. Campbell, presi- dent of city council, is well prepared for the next meeting; of the. Colons, should it prove to he trifle turbulent. Two weeks ago, at n noisy session, Campbell broke his gavel he banged away for order. 1-ast nifrht, City En- gineer Cari Spencer presented him with m new with m hickory handle! in Pennies Taken From Meters Pennies ainmounting; to not tn mention several dozen slugs wt-rc taken yester- day from parking in routine house cleaning hy 'he police depart- ment. The coin containers are   and said the n. and the prayer was given by Rev.: .appaiently had assumed that Tne -crowds at homes L. A. Schreiber of Central trinity Strike Ties Up Work at Goodyear AKRON. -41- -i e in a cnntrfict signed by would noi provide replacements Federation of In- foi fathers and combat veteran? .-alarir-fl unions, fppre-'no'v in service. Hr urged the de- nparly members, in partment to back his proposal for a six week extension to Julv 1. Tuesday in a dispute nvrr organ, activity of a pay raise offered by the company. he Soviet action. Then he stated again his judgment that it would be "unwise for the council to drop thc Iranian matter." He said the council could not ignore the fact that "the sudden reversal of the Iranian position oc- curred while Soviet, troops still WTP physically in Iran." Stet'inius said the United States question Russia's integrity. and Iran Raymond Tire Rubber Co. as havo reached an agreement on all ACCEPT TAA Of'l'KR nf ave rtnmmipt; PITTSBURGH Unionized and that thev a we? and of f "white collar" employes of thr influenced bv" a ma-s nf distorter! Pany who remained on Music for each day's services is Wrstinghousp Corp today mathematics'" ax 'namlf-nsncp workers afif-r bving presented by a male quartet, production was halted today at the a hourly wagp Johnson said the house measure CIO rubber workers protested the points and that, both wanted Members of the Rotary club ;case dropped. Calling position Gromyko said: "The delegate from the United States sacrifices logic in order to prolong and Merrick Thanked by Czech Aimed at Petrillo Who Received His Overcoat tended the service in a bodv. f0l-ltransfer of some employes to a lowing luncheon at the YWCA. department, a company Dr. Deer spoke this morning said. Lash high school. He will speak at: There was no report immediate- the meeting of the Hi-Y cluo atj ly on tnc nurnber workers af-, this evening, and at 8 o but the company declared he will address members of the j the stoppage began as a slowdown j this so-called Iranian question." Carrying out his intention an- A. N Men-irk, wlv liiTally th" off hi.-, in th'' Viriory Clothing ririvr hprp. WRS lhan amply witli receipt of 3 ioifri- from a akian war vp'pran thanking him for the gai'iiient. A hlur ppvlop" with a strange airmail stamp arrived at. Merrick's home. fi09 Merrick avenue from a Czech com- munity called Roznava after a transcontinental trip. Last January Zanos- ville joined the nation in col- lecting riothing for distribution to Europe's war victims. Hi" Merrick family mads a SIZF- ahl" contribution to 'he oam- pa'iKn. Morrick. who heard re- ports I h 3 t cio'hinz never roarhed those it was intended, placed a small in a nf the ovrcoat h" donated. On i! was plainly printed the following: "Write A. N. Merrick. 609 Merrick Avenue. Zanesville, Ohio. U. S. A." He never seriously expected 10 hear from it. Then the coat found its way to the home of the grateful Czcchoslovakian who. in an- swerins. probably had (Turn h> 8) WASHINGTON CTH-Prrsident ;sh'P Truman signed today legislation church, making ii a federal offense to Uff coercion against raido 'broad- jZanesville Baptist Youth Fellow-; ]ale yeslerday and that: work grad- 'nounced late yesterdav to make r liin n D 
                            

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication