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Zanesville Signal Newspaper Archive: March 21, 1946 - Page 1

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Publication: Zanesville Signal

Location: Zanesville, Ohio

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   The Zanesville Signal (Newspaper) - March 21, 1946, Zanesville, Ohio                        r. S. Considered Attacking Japs Before Pearl Harbor RvWIII.IAMT ___ _ J- By WILLIAM T. PEACOCK WASHINGTON Former :retary of War Henry L. Stim- i has disclosed that President osevelt's "war cabinet" discussed i rejected nine days before irl Harbor an American attack Japanese forces "without fur- T warning." recounted this in a tement sent to the senate- use committee investigating >an's surprise blow on Dec. 7, 1941. The committee made it pub- iic today. Stimson related that on the morning Of Friday, Nov. 28, 1941. he received information of Japa- nese movements along the Asiatic- coast. They were of such a "for- midable character" that he went to the White House. Mr. Roosevelt was still abed but received his secretary of war and they discussed the matter. The Stimson story continued. "He suggested that there were three alternatives, as my notes show: First, to do noth- ing; second, to make some- thing in the nature of an ulti- matum, stating a point beyond which we would fight; or, third, to fight at once. "I said that I felt that to do nothing was out of the question and the president agreed with me. As to The other tuo alternatives, the desirable thing to do from the point of view of our own tactics and safety was to take the initia- tive and attack without further warning. It is axiomatic that the best defense is offense. It is al- ways dangerous to wait and let the enemy make the first move. "I was inclined to feel that the warning given in August by the president against further moves by the Japanese toward Thailand justified an attack without further warning, particularly as their new movement southward indicated that they were about to violate that warning. "On the other hand. I realized that the situation could be made more clean cut from the point of view of public opinion if a further warning were given." (During its hearings, closed a month ago, the committee learned from state department records that Mr. Roosevelt warned the Japanese ambassador in August, 1941, that the United States would take steps to defend its interests if Japan engaged in further aggres- sion toward southeast Asia.) At noon on that same Friday, Stimson said, the so-called "war cabinet" met. In addition to Stim- son its members were Secretary of State Hull, Secretary of the Navy Knox. Admiral Harold R. Stark, the chief of naval opera- tions, and General George C. Mar- shall, the army chief of staff. Stimson said this meeting dis- cussed the possibile meaning of the Japanese an attack on the Philippines, on Thailand, Turn to Page Nine THE ZANESVILLE SIGNAL Associated Press NE4 TcfepJiofos A? 82ND 275 ZANESVILLE, O., THURSDAY EVENING, MARCH FIVE CENTS Our New Phone Number: 6-708 Today's the Day, Folks UNO Parley Won't Be Put Off-Truman Industrialist's Son Held for Attacking Girl Child Is Serious After Being Shot And Hammered Believe in Signs? Figure This One Out! a. m. to be departed and spring came in. You take it from there- day dreams of golf and fishing and gardening. And long, long, lazy days at the office with the frowning darkly at your obvious attack of spring fever, scared to death you'll notice his. e verna! at a. m. but it's rather doubtful the surprise swept anyone us feet e weatherman, however, >d along with" the new sea- and the mercury moved D 70 this afternoon under y skies. rht frost marked the end inter, with the mercury dipping this morning to 28.2, but this is not excepted to cause serious harm to budding fruit trees. Weather ers with lengthy memories explain that as far back as they remember spring began when the sun's center crossed the equator. Astronomically speaking, day and night throughout the globe arc now precisely 12 hours. March temperatures thus far been abnormally high and shrubs and grass are off to a good start. This of course, signals the beginning of the landscaping season and the de- mand here is inci easing for spare hands to help with this type of work Housecleaning likewise is un- der way and the rush is on for soaps and kindred materials. The forecast is for warmer tonight and tomorrow. re Patients ve Fletcher (Special to The BRIDGE, 245 pa- remained at Fletcher army 1 today after the early- g departure of a special Dealing 43 wounded soldiers kernan General hospital at Ind and to Camp 111. hospital is lo be abandoned armv within the next few and the state of Ohio is ex- to take over the 10 million institution for use as a men- L O. Burns, hospital ad- toda> that clearance rn recened from the sur- pneral's office for 155 of the inp not known when the next rent will leave Goering Claims He Didn't Xnowof Gestapo Murders i I Himmler Not His Friend, He Declared, Saying Even Hitler Was Kept in Dark NEUERNBERG, Germany Hermann Goering svvore today that he knew nothing of German concentra- tion camp slaughters. "Even Hitler didn't know approximately what went on because Himmler (nead of the gestapo) -always kept these things extremely secprl." the lead- ing defendant of 22 Nazis on trial 'for war crimes told the interna- tional military tribunal j Goering, still sharp in his ienth day on the stand, was em- phatic as he sought to place thei blame for camp horrors on the gestapo chief, who committed sui- Triiman Hopes No Rationing Ahead JOLIET, Attorney James E. Burke ,day issued a warrant charg- ing assault with intent to kill against James F. Lincoln, Jr., 30, son of a wealthy Cleve- land industrialist, in conneo ition with the hammer beat- 'ing and shooting of a nine year old girl yesterday. The prosecution obtained the warrant from Justice of the Peace Walter J. Schoop. Burke signed the complaint himself, and said he j would ask that bond be fixed ati when Lincoln is arraign-' ed later. j Lincoln's father, James F. Lin- coln. Sr. president of the Lincoln Electric company, eland, ar- rived here today with Lloyd a Chicago attorney, I Burke said young Lincoln signed a statement admitting the attack on the little girl after she resisted his advanc- es. Attendants at "Silver Cross j hospital smid the child was ex- pected to recover. j Victim of the attack, Carol Wil- liams, of Mr. and Mrs. George Williams, who live on a I farm four miles east of Joliet, 'suffered a possible skull !the result of the hammer bullet wounds in the right hip, in1 the upper right arm and shoulder and in the left side of the chest.' In River Forest, a Chicago sub- urb. Lincoln's wife, Laura, an ex- peetant mother, described her hus_ pop- if a wonuertui husband ancl, Uiat10n may die in coming months.1 'lieve he was in custody. I "We in India are faced Later she talked to'her husband ifamme' Slr Girja Shanker Bajpai, Jin jail and said she will ,for India at b> him" and will obtain legal coun- lnSton' told delegates from 47 na-, sel Their children are a to council here. This "safety zone" sign at the southwest corner of Mar- ket and North Fifth streets has puzzled motorists for some time. Because it is impossible to park a car in the three- foot space between the sign and the corner, they have proceeded to ignore it, con- sidering that the sign is just one of those screwy things which are found only in Zanesville. Recently, however, police have been tagging cars which have parked in the first parking space west of the sign (not between the sign and the corner Several of the motorists de- clared they will not pay then- fines and one of them appealed to The Signal to expose the thing as a joke Investigation discloses that city council recently author- ized the use of the first park- ing space on the south side of Market street west of Fifth as a taxicab stand. However, the confusing sign was erected on the wrong side of the parking space. The police de- partment is not charged with responsibility of erecting such signs. Its reported to be the business of the service depart- ment, or perhaps the taxicab company will have to put up its ow-n. UNRRAIsToU Of India's Plight ATLANTIC CITY, N Liquor Rationing Is More Drastic COLUMBUS Short- ening whisky supplies will force lengthening of the state liquor period to three weeks starting M o n d a j, Assistant Liquor Director A. I. BaJmert Iran Calls Up Wear-Olds US. Bucks RedDemand For Delay President Not Seeking Another Big 3 Conference WASHINGTON WP) 'President Truman declared flatly today that Monday's scheduled meeting of the United Nations security coun- cil will not be postponed. Mr. Truman told his news con- ference that the United States delegation will press for action on the Iranian case. The Soviets have asked for a 16-day delaj on the ground they need time to prepare their answer. Reminded of the Russian re- quest for a- postponement, the president was asked what will happen Monday if the Soviets insist on their plea. The president his ques- tioner he had better attend the meeting and find out. Mr. Truman again announced that he was not seeking another meeting of the "Big Three" to deal with differences between Russia and other members of the United Nations. The United Nations Organiza- tion, he said, is supposed to take over things that formerly were discussed by the Big Three. A three power conference was suggested in the senate yesterday iby Senator Pepper I Mr. Truman told newsmen he i would be glad to see any or all members of the UNO at any time. He simply is not asking for a Big Three meeting. The president said Secretary of inhowerAsks ft Extension HINGTON U1 Gen. O. Eisenhower asked con- today lo extend the draft and to limit serv- bility of inductees to 18 at is donr1, the chief of staff e house militaiy committee, my can release all fathers end of August or early tember regardless of how ley have been in service. is not done, he warned, nv may fall short by 165.000 nf its estimated needed h of on July 1, th Eisenhower and Sec- .v of War Robert f. Pat- n argued against propos- or a shorter extension of elective art. which cs on Ma> 15 of this year. "Id the .selective seivice l he continued and should "i inting program fail to es- nnd sustain a volunteer Ihe requisite Pat- said, "the military position and therefore our to preserve thr peace we >'on, would become precar- 'rson told the committrp tension of the draft should iled witli n 20 percent oxer- ease in pay and allowances military personnel. "Axis Sally" Faces Charges of Treason BERLTN -iJ1) Justice depart- 'ment representatives mformeri a 'woman ac'used as Berlin's "Axis ,Sally today tlial 1S lo br I taken to the United States and ichaigeri tieason I Tho Porlland Maine i native identified bv Ameiiran imilil.uv coveinnient official1. niav contin- for a vear are hnr- i ou mean 10 sav that ev en when WASHINGTON CR-President the Kreisleiters were informed of Truman today expressed the hope the concentration camps that you.'f'ia  to be restored by an- other bumper wheat crop. Should this   (or a com- found her father working in u Prehensive survey of all parts of field He fold him what had hap-, pened and suggested that Wil-1 telephone the sheriff Denison University Treasurer Is Dead CRANVILLE Millard to the United Nations Security Council against continued presence of Russian troops in Iran. Rightist Deputy Said Zia Ed- Din, described by political writers as anti-Russian, and known as a leading opponent of Premier Ahmed Quavam Es was tak- en into custody jesterday by t'.vo men in the uniform of Iranian army colonels. .conierence w-ere me uisaDied Zia Ed-Din told newsrren- "T v "But." he added, "if it is to belAmerican Veteians, the Veterans think they are arresting me be Andrei A said enlaiged lo include countries Foreign Wars, the American cause I am not liked bv the Rns today that any hasty actlon by the deficit or agencies which speak for Legion, the Marine Corps League i United Nations security council on such countnes then we claim a and the Blue Star Mothers seat for India Citing an acute housing short- the United i United Kingdom th le city in behalf of veterans ig homes for their families. I Organizations lepresented at the conference w-ere the Disabled The sharply divergent Soviet and American views on the critical United Nations test case came out simultaneously yesterday from the office, temporaulv m Washington, of UNO Secretary General Trygve i Lie. i RUSSIAN ENVOY I CONFERS WITH BYRNES Am- Yougoslavia now is i educed fo.age, the major said it is planned Brelsforri. 72. treasurer of Deni-jgrain allotments which will pei-jto make a house-to-house solicita- '.son university and secretary of itsimit only calories a day. and'tion in an effort to obtain corn- board of trustees, dterl last nightjthat almost limited to bread, sinceiplete information on available liv- of heart trouble in a has not orjing quarters for veterans and jGa. hospital hail been a trustee since i cheese, Stano Krasovec (old council for his nation the others without homes. Another meeting ot the auxiliary Rocket Soars 43 Miles Into Space the Iranian dispute merely would complicate it His comment was made shortly after a flat statement by President Truman that next Monday's UNO meeting will npt be postponed. Mr. Truman told his news con- ference today that the United ,States delegation will press for action in the contro- below 1902 He was a former president Gustavo Gutierrez of Cuba told heads and Mayor Watson has been; PASADENA, new of the- Ohio Baptist j the council that Cuba now has j set for next Thursday when a date 'Ionosphere rocket, developed by despite Moscow's request and hart held pastorates in Ur-'requests from 50 nations for its for the probably will be California Institute of technology, a 16-day delav bana. Ea.-t Cleveland and crops, and that it is selling agreed on and final arrangements'has soared 434 miles into space Gromyko talked with reporters villr. sugar to I'NRRA at haf price completed. It wa.s pointed out that in quest of weather secrets. at the department after a the demand probabh will increase The army ordnance department hurriedly-arranged con- as more veterans are released disclosed today the rocket, weigh- ference with Secretary Byrnes. from service. ,ing 16 feet long and 12 inches in diameter, had been Thousands of Eggs Smashed n Accident Near Fultonham Westinghouse Rejects Proposal A uhoppniR omrlp', big enough to feed nearly all thp kirls in tied up traf- fic for four hours last night on tlv steep hill immediately south of Fultonham. Fhp was created when a giant trailer loaded with 315 orates of eegs loose from the truck A? the fiont rnd of the tiail- pr diopped to the pavement Hie load sinftpd forward and .'6 of the crates, containing about eggs, weip smash- ed. Traffic was tied up until an- othei trailei was secured to transfer thp shipment Thp truck, owned by the Robinson Egg   West- chutf. i inghouse Electric Corp todaj re- Army autnonties> disclosed that jpcted a proposal nv the CIO in a lecent test at the White Sands i United Electrical Workers for set- Provmg Grounds at Las Cruces, of the 65-dav strike of 'New Mexico, the giant man-made The Soviet ambassador, who returned unexpectedly last nifht from New York, de- clined to tell newsmen what to Byrnes, but he re- iterated that Russia the Iranian case unquestion- ably should be delayed because negotiations are now under way between Iran and Russia. Asked in what way these nego- meteor soared to a new American are taking place he re- Turn 75.000 workers. Arthur S. Meyer, special media-, altitude record, feet. That tor in the dispute, announced thej's 43S miles. rejection after a mediation con- A parachute attachment brings 'ference. (the device back to earth. Its rec- Meyer said, how that hp and crd beight exceeds by some _ William H Davis, the second 000 feet the best achieved by the 'mediator, wero "exploring to Signal Corps' weather balloons OHIO Fair and somewhat if there is any possibihtj of of its development was not warmer today and tonight. Firday promise." disclosed. increasing cloudiness and, mild. I   

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