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Zanesville Signal Newspaper Archive: July 1, 1942 - Page 1

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Publication: Zanesville Signal

Location: Zanesville, Ohio

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   Zanesville Signal, The (Newspaper) - July 1, 1942, Zanesville, Ohio                               THE ZANESVILLE SIGNAL .VOL. 50 Alley Oop Goes to War We've got a tough guy on our side in Alley Oop of the Signal's comic page V. T. who draws the paints Oop as the insignia of the Oop bomber somewhere in Florida Commandos Raid New Guinea Base MELBOURNE -S Allied opening- offensive land operations in the Australian killed or wounded 60 Japan- lese troops and Captured war equip- ment in a raid on the big enemy base at New it was announced today. hey swept down from the rug- New Guinea mountains at dead slashed their way through defense and attacked Japanese with hand .grenades and bush knives. At the cost of two wounded they not only intlicted casualties on the strong- garnson and captured equip- ment but brought out information on the layout of the defenses in one of the most important ese bases in the southwest There was no announcement whether Australian or American or made the but it was known that American forces were in the general New Guinea area. The small though it served notice on Tokyo tKat the the Yanks and the Dutch were ready for such mt and run thrusts preparatory fo the general land offensive which Gen. Douglas MacAithur has promised Record War Bill Approved WASHINGTON proved in a fraq Ap- st-muiute Johnson Appointed Assistant Prosecfitor V. who served six years as prosecuting attoiney. day was appointed as an assistant prosecutor by Common Plea3 Judge P. H. TannehiH at a salary bf a year. He will serve during the absence of Prosecutor J one of his law who was recently inducted into the army and 75 now stationed at iMJiss. Judge Tannehill said that 9 John- son's appointment will not the status or salary of Assistant Prosecutor Clarke who was appointed by Kincaid when he office on Jan. 1941. gets a year. Bar- Johnson was elected prosecuting attorney for years in Novem- and was rcelected for a four-year term m succeeded him in office Kmcaid In icdrd fed- eral appropriations fective today department faced future without funds. Deadlocked senate conferees were unable mise separate fiscal 1943. could not agree on resolution to give the.j temporary funds. pay Furthefnore. they form of a day is July 8. Against the deadline Of fiscal congress set Jltnv record for appropriations approved ia one The largest 067 for the army whic J pfcsed in the senate after CJ-5 minutes of discussion. The war uhich is the largest single in world of -noney horize HELD FOR MUIttJEK ties said today that a first degree murder charge had been liled lagamst Thomas jn cor- nection with the snooting of his William 21. Wounded in the neck and Ravcncraft was found dying m the road between their homes. construction of Elmer revealed. 11 v___.....__ money to the thaj was given to the during the first World Before endmg the record-break- ing spending took a httle less than 10 a death sentence for the once-popular Conservation Corps. It granted that agency for self-liquidation with- in one f W_ __ Fair to Be Heid i As Here The Muskingum Acuity fair will be held as schedule this it was announced definitely today by Pearl tary of the board. The dates 18 to 22. Plans for the f position are nennng Klhott Ohio fair at a recent meeting in Columl passed a mo- tion favoring i exposi tiona Direc j FOR ONCE I'LL WITH THE MKT SANS AS LONJG- AS NME KEEP PHNSICMl RT AND IN 600D KEAL. NO ONE CANJ LICK Transportation had asked for aba to conserve milted their cont uV ntt place use t ion of the r of Defense it B. Eastman lament of the but per- uance if they ira burden on Huge Tank Battle Rages Near Kursk Germans Claim Summer Offensive Now Under Way MOSCOW. Ger- man hurling more and more men and machines at the Russian lines regardless of the made slight gains on the Kursk front and hammered relentlessly at the battered defenses of Sevasto- The Russians said they were killing Axis troops by the thous- TWO CENTS WEDNESDAY JULY 1942 NAZI DRIVE SLOWED IN Gennsa broadcast tonight said that the fall of Sevastopol appears to be ands but the incessant attack in- dicated that the Geiman armies had opened their all out drive for -he Caucasus through the Ukraine district. German communique Indi- cated the full Axis summer drive had started and claimed that some of the inner defenses of Sevasto- pol had been Russian and Axis forces were ocked in a big tank battle on the Kursk front where it was estimat- id more than 150 German panzers already had been some of them when they were cut off from supporting infantry. A Rus- sian communique said more than German officers and men killed on a single sector in Menaced by Onrushmg Germans 30 MIUS TO PORT SAID AND SUEZ CANAC is tho great British naval base the eastern Mediterranean.. It is the immediate prize sought by Gen. Erwin clanking German columns. If Alexandria there is little hope for the Suez one day's fighting. The Kursk drive started four days ago. Red the army said the Axis had made slight gams in the mam sector and now was trying to consolidate its position and bring up fresh troops protect its flanks. aim is to widen this front but the Russians have repulsed all ntTfisnTc ing severe losses in men and ma- a front line dispatch said. An earlier communique said that in a pitched battle between oppos- ing tank columns the Red army de- stroyed nine more of the enemy's There were no substantial changes on any fronts other than at Sevastopol and and it was presumed the German drive of Kharkow had slowed down. most of its defenses flattened by the 25-day siege in which the Germans have thrown countless tanks and dive bombers nto the fighting and shelled al- most constantly with heavy artil- still fought on. New motorized divisions w ere being used today In a knockout attempt but the Russians said they were killing 'housands. Prices Pegged on Retail Services WASHINGTON. Price tilings on retail services went in- o effect today as the government moved closer to overall price con- to hold down the war-time ost of living. Ceilings also became effective last midnight on housing rents in population centers with 00 inhabitants. The lid on retail services gener- illy established prices at March but the housing ceilings set at different rent periods in various communities. Today was also the deadline for etailers to file ith local war TICC and rationing boards state- ments of ceiling prices on cost-of- articles sold by the stores. Very istributor and manufac- urer must have on display today a tatement of the highest prices he harged during March for article by general price regula- lons. 10 Reported Killed in Plane Crash VV. American Airlines was reported to have crashed three miles from Welch today. First accounts said that 10 to 20 persons had been IdUed. Jfceports reaching Welcfc stated that the plane had burn- ed after in this mountainous region of south- western West Virginia. The plane's flight route and its passenger list could not be learned The McDowell county sher- iffs office said the plane ap- parently had crashed into a mountain side. Reports reacihng tihe sher Iffs office were that as many as 20 persons may have been were 'to have been strewn along the wooded mountain side. CHICAGO Officials of American Airlines said to- day that all of their planes in the Vicinity of W. have been accounted and that the plane reported to have crashed near there have been one of those turned over to the army by the airline. U. S. Aii craff Carrier Safe After Daring Trips to Malta MThc U S. Aircraft carrier Wasp hns car- ncd British plane- to besieged Malta day in officially cl 'v once of the Mediterranea The navy muniquo that tin several ferrying i. R. A. F. planer I the trips iV t-hoy started. During ono of he nnvy en cd Malta just aft A. F. pilots had j creased number of the enemy reinforcements he navy SQld to- losing the pres- naval vessels in iod m a com- Yasp had made Jo Xalta with citf 10L reveal or where ring pisi attack- K OUp of R A' from the d by the In- n ling fight- considera- ble the corrimumiuc added. planes toox off from the Wasp engag rt 4 the enemy over Malta before ata beore on the Island. After landing refueling at the airdrome wre again m the air continuing tjo the ene- my attack 30 minutes after The communique said that the timed arrival of the re- inforcement planes on the Wasp was most fortunate for the heroic defenders of the British stronghold and the cause of the United Na- The communique did not elabor- ate on that point. It was emphasized that the Wasp accomplished all of its trips with- out damage cither to the escorting ship or to the aircraft earner it- self. The identity of the escort ves- sels was not disclosed. the most bombed spot In the has been a keystone in the British defense of the Mediter- ranean. Malta Is only ahout 20 minutes' bombing distance from Sicily. Its gcographalc position makes it a vi- tal base for the interception of Axis supply and troop transports across tho Mediterranean to North Africa Commission May Hear Spy Case WASHINGTON Ap pointment of a military commis sion by President Roosevelt to try the eight German saboteurs appre- hended m this county last week was said to be under consideration today as a possible solution to the legal technicalities involved in the case. It was learned authoritatively that a military rather than courts was being given strong consideration in joint consultations of war and justice but spokesmen would neither confirm nor deny this. it was learned that rec- ommendations for the type of pro- cedure would be placed before the president jointly by Attorney Gen- eral Francis Biddle and Secretary of War Henry L. Stimson for final decision as soon as practicable. A military have the full commission powers of would courts martial and civil courts. As commande r- in chief of the armed Mr Roosevelt has full powers to order such a hear- to set rules of and to name both prosecutor and de- fense counsel. 1 15 Hurt In Train Wreck Ga. The en- of the southbound Chicago to Miami passenger train ''South- was killed today when a northbound tram crashed headon nto the streamliner. Twelve to 15 persons on the northbound tram were none ac- cording to Cairo hospital officials. The crash occurred on the single track line near at 6-30 a. m. The had gone past the station stop and was about to pull back into a switch when the northbound train plough- ed into the engine. T. B. SPECIALIST Warren C. Dayton tuber- culosis died last night of a heart ailment. He had been superintendent of the SUllwater sanatorium since 1919 and was a consultant for the Ohio Soldiers and Sailors Orphans' home at Xenla. He had been ill for a year but continued his practice until two months ago. He was born at Piqua. Churchill Charged With Making Untrue Statements on Libyan War States dive bombing planes have reached or are on their way to various theaters of the the government revealed today in commons debate on the conduct of the war. The debate brought a charge that Prime Minister Winston Churchill had made and in- statements on the situation in Libya. Oliver Lyttelton. production who opened for the gov eminent praised the work of States General Grant tanks 11 Libya and intimated that had been enough the scale might been is a match in battle agains the best tanks Rommel Field Marshal Ervvin has former production speaking- in the House ot sajd orders for dive bombers had in States after Iffie Churchill gov- ernment came into has been some dis- appointment in deliveries of these planes but no doubt some share of the responsibility rest- ed in this he said. Beaverbrook said he had not thought there was any short- age of equipment in Ubya and never had heard a suggestion of an aircraft shortage. developed in the western desert in the present Lyttelton said in the first speech for the govern ment in a two-day debate with Churchill's office at stake. A motion lor impeachment of the persons responsible m view o 1'Capt. Lyttelton's terrible disclo- was ruled out of order. Sir John conser- moving a motion of no con- fidence in the central direction of the attacked Churchill in his rapacity as defense Charged bungling in war direction and said. minister of defense In the knowledge of the facts as we know tbem today could possibly ave made the statements Mr. Churchill made to the effect that we were on equal terms with the enemy in Libya. were untrue and inac- Wardlaw-Milne charged that Britain lost Singapore because it 'ielieved that American sea power vould be available to defend Brit- ish sea positions in the Far East .nd by implication demanded an nquiry on Libya similar to that the United States conducted on Pearl Harbor. Inquiry did not upset the United government or brce the people into he said. This was in response to an ap- eal by an Turn to Page Three rew Bails Out As Bomber Crashes URBANAT O. twin- .otored army medium bomber rashed and burned three miles est of Urbana last night after the x crew members abandoned the lip and parachuted to safety. Army authorities at Patterson near said the a routine flight from Kansas ran out of gas. The pilot or- ered his crew to abandon the lane after attempts to land failed. The phone fell on the farm of arold after circling iveral times in search of a clear Tiding field. All of tbe crewmen landed In the icinity of the burning plane. One ier parachuted into the Mad river nd waded to Stickley re- ortcd. NewZealanders Rout Germans By RICHARD McMELLAN by United WITH THE NEW ZEALAND ARMY COPvPS IN THE BRITISH FRONT LINE Marshal Erwin KammeLJias one in this battle for the Nile. His 90th light division sent in Its on against the Brit- ish line. Newly arrived New Zealand troops met them in the moonligh and went in with the bayonet. The when they saw the flashing and behind It the big New Zealanders and the Maoris who are as big and tough as the Anzacs of European turned and ran. Germans have not liked us since we met them at Sidi Rezegh and dislike us even more so a New Zealand intelligence colonel told me. 'If anyone feels mopey about this show it's not us. AH our men have their tails Th e New Zealanders had been destined for but when it became untenable they were sent southward to harass the southern flank of the Germans. day Saturday we had an ar- tillery duel with the enemy filter- ng the colonel 'On our left the British tanks cracked steadily at the German tanks. 'German tanks but our 25-pounder and knocked out a HWe couldn't make out what happening to the enemy Their Turn to Ten Jap Attack on Russia Held Near British mil- itary commentator said today that apan would attack Russia at its 'own chosen and there -as widespread belief here that he moment would come this sum- mer after the Japanese staff had ime to guage Hitler's Russian Tospects. The general movement north- vard of armed Japanese much of it concentrated on the Si- eria has underlined the growing conviction here that the ittack on Russia's maritime prov- nces is not far off. There are no accurate figures on he Japanese strength m Manchu- but the crack Kwantung which has taken no part in he China presumably massed along the borders. Former Resident Killed on Railroad George of Lancaster former resident was killed this morning when a Penn- sylvania railroad section maintan ence car which he was operating jumped the track and seven miles west of Lancaster. Dice was a cousin of Edgar A of Euclid avenue. He moved from this city to C. 10 years and had been trans' ferred to Lancaster during the pasi 10 days. Dice was a member of the signal maintenance crew for the Lancas- ter division of the Pennsylvania railroad. George also oj who was riding on the car with was not injured. _A natiye ot Dice moved to this city 30 years ago. He was a member of the Putnam Presby- as many terlan and served deacon of the church for years. He was a former sional baseball and had visited here on numerous occasions since making his home in Wash- C. H. Surviving are his and two Staff Sergeant Evan of Orlando and Flying Cadet Ronald of Cali- fornia. U.S. Plans New Salvage Drive WASHINGTON Gov- ernment officials drew plans to- day for a nation-wide salvage collection campaign which they warned must bring in huge stores of scrap iron and steel to prevent a second shutdown of vital steel 'urnaces. War Production Chief Donald M. appealing to Americans to contribute piece of scrap disclosed that at one ime m recent months 15 furnaces had been inactive because they lacked the needed scrap to mix ivith iron ores to produce steel. The drive will start July hree days after conclusion of the rubber collection and ivill include waste fats and some cans. Housewives will be asked to sell tvaste fats to meat who in turn will ship it to glycerine producers for use in the manufac- of explosives. Metal collec- ions will flow through regular channels. Details of the tin can will not apply to the whole will be announced later. Some local and state sal- vage committees operating under the WPB will take the collection appeal into every home and fac- tory in the country. No time limit was set on the and Lessing J. chief of the WPB bureau of industrial said the program would be a con- tinuing effort. Auchinleck Calls For United Effort Panzer Units Move on Toward Alexandria EGYET. Gen. Sir Claude Aiichinlecfe called upon the British armed forces today for a supreme fort to it Axis invasion cracks in major battle for Egypt thatja may already started id' the El Alamein 60 n miles from Alexandria base. Late advances from the front said despite successful Brit- ish counter-blows that slowed the enemy the col- umns had pushed 30 miles past Daba and made contact with ini- perial positions the El Alameia. sector. f An important battle may be la progress today in the El Alamein which the British still these advices indicating that' Auchinleck's stirring order day was issued as a prelude what may be a decisive engage- ment. dispatches that British commanders in Egypt were prepared if necessary to block Suez render Alexandria naval base useless if it should fall to the enemy and to remove destroy six French warships now at Alexandria. Axis reports ed the British fleet had already departed through the Suez The Axis columns of JTield shal Erwin Rommel have pusnecl 0 some 200 miles into Egypt might be expected to lose some of 4 their momentum as British forcements reached the ground. Whether Rommel carr muster the punch to break toward either Cairo or probably- day or more because of the area over which attack and ter-attack is in progress. i The important thing In 'this struggle is not entirely the number of miles of desert4 gained -or re-' but the destruction1 enemy tanks and mechanized equipment before Rommel can achieve his goal- Today's munique said that enemy tanks had been but made no mention of our losses. The Axis vanguard approached -1 British positions but fighting on a large scale -T has not the communique- J asserted. j Allied bombers lashed out last night at Axis motor transport landing grounds around 120 miles west of Alexandria. The im- perial command reported the raids were Allied air force planes continued to attack enemy concentrations in the battle doing their utmost to sap German Field Marshal Er-t win Rommell's strength. The communique said that ng an enemy raid on Malta Mon- day night fighters des- troyed one Junkers Highly mobile imperial task struck at enemy armored- over a wide area be- the coast and the Qattara depression 40 miles trying1 j. both to break up enemy concentra- c ions and to prevent the setting up of a trap which might envelop a large defending body of the Brit- f ish defenders. J Continually harassed by the mo- ile columns the Germans f Italians under German Field Mar- ihal Erwin Rommel nevertheless ad driven eastward of El Daba and their advanced elements were their way steadily forward. As at 75 miles to the j the Imperial forces made no- '1 attempt to defend El Daba in force of their present necessity 15-MinuteWarBondSale IHere Meets With Success howers and scattered hunder showers in east and south lortion today. Moderate tempera- ure today and cooler tomghu Fire truck factory whist- les and church bells blended noisily at noon today to signal the open- ing of the for unr bond and stamp sales cam- sponsored by the ZanesviHe Retail Merchants' association. Nothing but war stamps were sold in bonds stores and here noon until p. m. Ac- cording to Kenneth chair- advanced reports from down- town merchants Indicated that the 15-mmute had met with marked success. Reports were being tabulated this afternoon. Muskingum county's bond and stamp quota for the month is The for campaign continue through- out July. During the first week of the clerks m the stores will engage in a contest for a war bond to be awarded to the person selling the most bonds and stamps. Each retail store throughout the nation will try to sell enough war bonds and stamps to equal four per cent of its July business. During the rest of the re- tailers plan a vast program of radio and magazine elaborate window dis- special sales rallies and other promotional ac- tivities. The national quota for the month is of maintaining a fluid front which would permit defense in depth and if the enemy forces over- stretched result in the J trapping of some of Rommel's tanks. Panamanian Ship Sunk in Atlantic The United The sinking of a medium-sized Panamanian merchantman an- nounced today by the navy brought to at least 339 the number ot United Nations ships sunk by my submarines and mines in the western Atlantic since mid-Jan- j uary. An east coast port 'Deceived including two who previously been torpedoed coast of Malta last The ship'sj dog mascot also was saved. None of the survivors was jured. In previous 24 hours the na1 had announced the sinking of thr more ships by with 4 total of 67 lives lost. DENIES CHARGE est Minsflcld tory pleaded innocent yep terday to a first degree raurdi charge m connection with death of Charles prisoner from r r   

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