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Zanesville Signal: Sunday, September 29, 1935 - Page 1

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   Zanesville Signal, The (Newspaper) - September 29, 1935, Zanesville, Ohio                               Section One 'MAIN NEWS SECTION SUNDAY TIMES-SIGNAL THE WEATHER fair Bun- day preceded by light rain In northci.'-t portion Sunday morning. .Cooler. VOL. LH, No. 12 ZANESVILLE, OHIO, SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, SIX CENTS PER FLORIDA ESCAPES HURRICANE S PS FROM STORM; A MIAMI HIT BY IGH WINDS; O DAMAGE Red Ci oss Had Refugee Trains Ready To Remove People From Lake Okeechobee Area; Auto hers Evacuated District Early; Loss To Jamaica Banana Crop Is FIND BIG STILL AT FULTONHAM; GET LIQUOR ______ nf 'henrtnuarter.. manufactures equipment aurt Miami. Flu.. Sept. hurricane warnings were hauled :down n'.ong Florida's cast coast to- night as the tropical disturbance re- ported to have taken 27 lives in Cuba, and Jamaica passed off Miami -'In tho Atlantic ocean. The Jacksonville weather bureau described the disturbance as greatly diminished In Intensity "but still dangerous for sometime to come" as it traverses the tea. Veering of the storm from its, northward course saved the Miami area from severe winds. All danger ,1-as reported past In the Luke Okcc- jriobce region where trains stood UNCLE DRIVE AGAINST ALL Crime's Invasion Into Busi ness to Get Attention From "G-Men" Down the Big Onej Wholesale distribution of Illegal liquor, almost under the ryes and of the local department. revealed Saturday as police under Chief Herb Klmfcerly. fed- eral officers and nherlff'.i depu- ties uncovered n gallon Mill end sonic HO pulKm cans of the Illicit beverage. The still was unearthed near Fultonham. and was considered capable of turnlnc out Rood quantities of the Illegal drink during operation. Tile finished product found In an allev on -South street, near police Secrecy Mirroonded the actlilty of the officers Saturday nlRlit and no arrests were reported In connection with the confiscated equipment. It Intimated, that n connection existed be- tween the discovery of the Illegal manufacturing equipment and the arrest, earlier In the day, of James W. Murphy. Murphy was held for federal officers on an Investigation charge. Officials refused to comment on their activities, hut it was be- lieved arrests of pen-oils enjnjed In the distillery were Imminent. Washington. Sept. dreaded threat of prosecution by "M term for Un- cle hurled today at crimin- als who. bludgeon Interstate com- merce into paying annual millions in tribute. J. Edgar Hoover, director of! .'the bureau of investigation, announced that his "G-men1; are making a. na- tlon-wldo Investigation of organized crime's invasion Into -wide now. because kidnaping, cxtor- "tlon, bunk; robbery and crimes of that type axe pretty generally under con- trol." Jooeph B. Keenan, assistant attor- ney general in charge of crime cases, said' the year-old federal racketeering law "Is clrcum.-crlbcvl by obvious- sharp limits." He added.- however, that It would permit the government's crack man- hunters to move against racketeers whenever their actions effected goods or buMncss moving across slate lines. Hoover's announcement, followed his return from what he termed a "bird dog" survey of conditions In New York, where a special Investiga- tion into widespread racketeering 'was ordcrd recently by Governor Leh- ady to evacuate the inhabitants. Walter J. Bennett at -icksonvllle Aild the strongest wind: ere occurring tonight In the Mlam cctlon where last reports gave vc ocltics of -10 miles an hour and gust, omewhat higher. Meanwhile disaster workers Jellc Glade. Fla.. notified natlona ...I Cross headquarters that 80 pc cut of ruitomobllc-o'.vning resident f the Lake Okeechobee ha ilready fled. Refugee trains authorized 'by th Cross arranged to take 5.0C jcrsons to Sebrlng. The Red Cross :here prepared to meet their food, clothing and medical needs. Cuban officials after checking advices reaching Havana from the 150-mile path of the storm which struck there last night and today r.ald reports failed to substantiate earlier Information from navy hend- quartcrs that 30 persons had perish- ed at Clcnfuegos. Naval officials said, however, there was no reason to modify the origlna estimate of SCO Injured with Imatcly 1.000 homes destroyed o rjndly damaged. Reports from Kingston, Jamaica said two died there as the tall end of the storm struck last night. Dam age to the banana crop was esti mated at with about 000 loss to roads and bridges. Heav rains accompanied the storm. PAROLES REWARD FOR TESTIMONY AT PROBE Dynamite Storage House Near Lehanon, Pa., Ex- plodes; Heavy Damage m TROOPS IP Mii Convicts Who Talked Against Thomas Go Free or Get Easier Jobs On Inside Governor Orders Guardsmen to "Reign of Terror" Dis- trict Because of Strike Lebanon. Pa.. Sept. ynr.mlte storage house at a clone uarry in suburban West Lebanon, with a terrific shock clt 30 miles away, Injuring 11 per- ons in Leb-.inon. No one was seriously hurt. Those njvired suffered from lacerations ai-.d cuts caused by flying glass from broken windows. The storage house, a frame shack, 9 a half mile from the nearest house and police said they considered it unlikely that there was anyone hurt place itself. Virtually every window in Lebanon was broken, and as far away as Lan- caster, 30 miles to the south, and Reading, nil equal distance easlward windows were shattered and the shcck was felt. It was reported the quarry at which the dynamite storage house is located, hr.s been idle recently, but Informa- tion about..the place was meager. Lebanon' police'said they did not "know "who, owned It. or whether or not, it has .'been busy recently. All'extra-police and'firemen were called'to duty In Lebanon after busi- nessmen .issued'appeals.Ior protection for sfr'resV. plate glass, windows of -'which' had" becTKsmashed: ft-fire. pra- 'ced'td' the explosion quarry; tut these.were, hot immediately con- Police said the damage would run "into thousands of dollars." ...v Columbus. Sept. E. Thomas, still feeling the sting of charges which preceded his resig- nation as warden of Ohio peniten- tiary, declared today a "pay-off" continues for convicts who testified against him. He asserted: Edgar Russell, whose mother ac- cused of immoral conduct has been paroled; Jimmy Wilson. who. testified Three Young Men Hurt In Maysville Pike Wreck Saturday Night Tho "chief G-maji" said the bu- 'rcau'.i survey will bo general, rather than localized., nnd will be directed primarily toward such lines of busi- ness as Jewelry, poultry and trucking. Keenan ff.ld that racketeering uu- the guise of labor unions Is out- side ihu federal -owrr. and that strictly local rackets can- not be attacked by tho "G-men." In large cltlr" near state borders ,uch as New York, Chicago and Kan- sas City, he indicated the field is open, for federal prosecution. Hero arc some actions which Kee- nan suggested the government might attack: Destruction of goods or beating of drivers on trucks delivering goods across state lines, us from New VjO-Scrnnton, Pa. Attempts to damage goods shipped. Vor instance, by a Now York dcpart- 'mcnt store to customers in New Jersey. Attacks on laundry deliveries across R state line. against R salesman at- tempting to sell his goods In a city outside of his home state. "Racketeering generally falls in- side the state authority." Keenan sold "Most'racketeers nrc the Ca- pone type of fellow.' The average racketeer will stick cloje to his home _nH stronghold, especially If he has good political Because the federal Inw Is hedged with restrictions, Kccnr.n said, 'some feel at times that we might be better off even without this statute in Its -.present form." 'FORMER MAYOR LIMA KILLED ON CROSSING Lima. Sept. H. Rogers. 70 former mayor of Uma. was killed tcdnv when Dl" automobile stalled on a grr-.dc crossing In the p.ith of the Broadway Limited, crnc.lt Pennsyl- vania train. impact of the crash threw Rogers clear nnd the train dragged car 100 feet before stop- ping. Fcur perrons were non seriously, in automobile accldeiita 1 and near this city "Saturday alter nccn snd evening. Three young'; men-'- cu bruises when.'thij ''mach'irie _m Frankfort. Ky.. Sept. tional guardsmen' tonight advanced on what C.ov Ruby LatToon calls Harlan county's' "reign of terror" over roads made famllinr to them by two ether marches this year. Although Harlan county Judges and peace officers sold there was no civil disorder in the rich soft coal the governor ordered the oc- cupation after hearing -United Mine Workers of America denounce condi- tions. Adj. Gen. Henry H. Dcnhardt said "at least half" of his'expedition will occupy the of vio- lence In labor, political and factional strife for a. Den- hardt .said the union men gave the governor "affidavits .concerning trie terrible in the county and after hearing the testimony the gov- ernor decided to protect the lives of the citizens of the county it would necessary to send troops." "Howard Williams, negro, told the governor deputy sheriffs beat him Wednesday night, took him to the Virginia line and told him to stay out of the county. Governor Laffoon said he received of telegrams and telephone calls about Harlan conditions, ask- ing for troops. "From all I can learn" he declared, "a general state of lawlessness exists there." The troops will put down 'the worst reign of terror in the history' of the the governor added. Judge James M. Gilbert of the Harlan circuit said at his Plnevllle. Ky., home that there was no dlsor- de'r He summoned A. J. Pinko. labor organiser who hns been quoted in report-', of trouble. Harlan Coun- IV Attorney H. M. Fuson said at Hnrlan: "We know of no disorders of any kind." County Judge Mor- Snylor said he had checked all and that there was no trouble. Snylor said no eviction had been filed by coal com- panies, as charged In complaints re- vealed by Dcnhnrdt. gainst Thomas in a hearing on largcs brought by Welfare Director largaret Allman. has been paroled: Other convicts, who 'homas' administration of prison ffalrs. have been rewarded with osier Jobs. Thomas, now a lecturer and wrlt- r on criminology and penology, look- d back over the months since he cslgned May 1. and pointed to hanges in the "Big har.gcs. he-said, which he sought and was denied. He said In an interview that nu- merous some of Ihen with bad records, had been trans .'erred to the London prUon farn: reducing the crowded population o the prison. When he was warden, h said, he was able to obtain npprova for the transfer of only first term ers and not many of them. ll IDEA-liDYE SAYSJESIP! Confer, Enroute West; With Leaders On Dam Project Methodists In Session In Co lumbus Hear Fine Address; Fultonham Man, Elder BIG SHOTS Ol GRID UPSET I FIRST GAMElasiip Alabama Gets Draw -With Howard; Ohio Illinois; Notre Dame Trounces Kansas; Wisconsin, Virginia Slaughtered; East Teams Live Up To Advance Notices Cclumbus, Sept. Rev. James Myers of the Federal Council of the Churches of Christ In Amer- ica, advocated a new economic sys- tem, founded upon "the Christian principle of co-opcrattcn." In an ud- drciia to the Ohio Methcdist Episco- pal conference here tonight. "Unregulated competition and the prcflt systems." he said, "tend to de- velop tho acquisitive instinct and re- sult in an unbrotherly distribution j of the means of the good life. They] must give place to nil economic sys- tem founded upon the Christian prin- ciple of co-operation, with produc- tion planned to meet human need rather than for the profit of a few." Mr. Myers, author of a ol books, on Industrial relations, spcke before the 'youth" banquet of the con- ference., wh'lch -closes-next, week v.'llh assignment of pastors. The conference .deferred until Mon- day, action .'on a proposal to divide the sta.te conference into four dis- tricts instead- of two._ '_; t, The conference' heard Dr.'-'Lester .a: a' 'pronounced Increase By HERBKRT Associated Press The wooly lambs of inter- collegiate football roared like lions yesterday and cut the big- fellows right down to their own size. Cornell, Illinois, Wisconsin and Virginia all were beaten and Alabama, Rose Bowl champion, was tied, as the 11935 season formally got un- der way in spectacular style. perked .car; .Maysvllle near Moxahalti. "park, at', 11 o'clock They were: linli Illlnl, hailed 111 as possible dark-horse runtciHlers for the Blj; Ten crown fell brfnro a fljIitliiK Olilo Uni- versity outfit, 6-0, and Wiscon- sin's Ifculst'rs uer.s upset South Dakota State. 13-6, In the iTild-ucsfs two MR form rercr- sals. Cornell, altlmuRli threaten- ing (iften, ciniltl not deevlop in-rrln- iitir.cli and went down be- fore St. lumrence university ot Caiitiin, N. Y.. Virginia.-of the Southern conference, was Ijcntcn. The biggest of .all. however, was' the.'fallurj' of' 'Alabama's c_rlm- sDu'tidc to.get'better .'than a. .7-7 draw W. BARKER Sports Writer with Howard of Birmingham. ng the scoring punch FrovltfedVlaiV; by the Dixie Howell-Don" on combination, the .tide" self held. In check by .the school's stalwart defense. Notre Dame, aiming -at. its former position around trounced Kansas of the while Minnesota, the nation's-power-v house in to turn loose extra steam in the "second half to back. North Dakota, bra-ska, co-favorite-with Kansas. for the Big Slit crown this year, ped Chicago easily. In the east only, Dartmouth and Vlllanova to' advance notices.' Navy tli trounced .William and same margin by which [BeA-tji Raiders whipped Niagara. had no uneasy' minutes in a queit of Norwich, -'and Villanpva--; battered 'Ursinus. 31-0.-' Pitt's., Pan.-; thcrs. however.; had', trouble Wayr.isburg.' winning' only; Foriv.ism'. had to s-ore': twice- final' qusrtrr. to whip; Franklin Marshall. -14-7. -'WMt- Virginia? better than fi Viro! n .-V Evangelist Spake to Record Crowd On Recent Visit; Invited to Return Evangelist Bob Jones may return to Zanesvillc la March for a cam- paign. The evangelist was in Zanetville Thursday calling on old friends dur- ing the' day and in the evening a ca- pacity audience filled Market Street Er.ptlst church, one of the largest auditoriums in the city, to hear his lecture. Arc We It was evident Ircm the turn-out and from the enthusiasm of the audi- ence that the speaker has lost none of his popularity during his long .-twnce and plans were immediately Inaugurated to have him return In tho early spring lor an evangelistic campaign of not le.v; than two weeks. It Is likely that the rcrvlce will be sponsored by the Market Street con- gregation. Bob Jones and his party conduct- ed a tabernacle campaign here a number of years ago and since then he has returned several times to ap- pear on the lecture platform. nue and Bernard Masterscn. Schaum avenue. They received treatment at Ecthesda hospital nnd were later dl.v- to their homes. Sheriff Ed Redman, who was called, to the scene of the accident, reported that the parked occupied by a named Mcllck, was without lights. Joseph Wlneman. 44, 28 'Amazon avenue, received a.severe cut on the heed when he lost control of his car and struck a telephone pole on West Main street, at 4 o'clock Saturday afternoon. He was removed to Good Samaritan hospital and was reported to be rent- ing easily. Wlneman was said K> have crashed when he attempted to make a turn on West Main street: POTTERY STRIKE IS REPORTED UNDER WAY Failing to reach an agreement, fol- lowing a demand for a ten percent Increase in pay, union pottery work- ers of Rc-icvlllc and Crooksvllle will go out-on strike Wednesday. accord- Ing to reports here last night. H is stated in the event the strike Ls pro- longed that Idle miners from the Hocking district will be brought in to aid In picketing the several plants. It was stated last night that there Is no reason to believe that R settlement of the differences will be reached In advance. SCORE ANOTHER DEATH F 0 R HIT-SKIP DRIVER Cincinnati. Sept. un- identified boy about 12 years old. wns killed tonight as an automobile struck the bicycle he was riding. The driver did not stop, witness re- ported, but continuing at high sp1" Ills machine struck another car. AGED HANKER DIES Attica, Sept. Sution. 71. prudent of the Sullon State of Attica for the last 16 years, died today of apoplexy. He had teen connected with the bank since 1880. I-Mncr.il services will be held Monday. u-lawnrc, Kept. -on 21 nr Springs. w" 'pcrlous condition In n ho.i- nl'ul the result of nn aulomoblle- tiuck collision in Magnetic Spring.-. VMt nlEht. Hhrrlff William Kauscli if union county exonerated the fuck driver, Hermnn Sncffcr. CLOCKS MOVED HEAD ONE HOUR THIS MORNING The Associated Press Daylight Snvlng Time ended at 2 a. m. today. At that hour clocks were turned back to I a. m., restoring the hour lost last April when the hands were moved forward an hour. Approximately 35.000.0C-0 per- sons in the United Stntes and Canada observed daylight saving time this year, the Merchants As- sociation of New York said. 'veil..Sept. President Roose- velt, expressing confidence the new. of farm equality" will live.-moved Into the western mountain states tonight to study works problems of the area. "Methods and machinery he -said In a back platform address at Fremont. Neb., 'but principles go.and I have faith that, no matter what at- tempts may be made to tear It down, the principle of farm equality ex- pressed by the agricultural adjust- ment act will not die." He apparently was presenting tils first labile for 193G. At North Platte. Just at nightfall, Mr. Roosevelt, was Joined by Senator O'Mahoney of Wyoming: jovcrnbr Johnson of Colorado; Sena- tors Costlgr.n and of Colora- do: Mayor Stapleton of Denver; Paul Prosper, Colorado attorney general: and John attorney. The westerners one of the first things to be discussed was the pro- posed Caddoa dnm project on the Arkansas river. The group went Immediately lnto discussion with the busy president m his private car at the rear of the train. A tremendous crowd fur- rounded the spacious stntlon grounds at North Platle. .Bishop Smith cf.Clncin- "natl urged the, delegates to'glvc more thought to retired min- isters and their .widows.' The conference completed election (Continued on Page Two) Among the "Enuthcrri'pdweri: machine red rou gh-sh'od over.' CarbilnaV TOY GUN HOLDUP Delaware. Sept. Juvenile authorities held a 13-year- old boy tcdnv In connection with the toy gun hold-up several weeks of Gertrude Manchester. Authori- ties said he confessed robbing her of SI. Youth Passed Away in Hos pital Where Uncle is Also Recovering From Fall Columbu.-. Sept. John Helm. Jr., 11. of Springfield, climbed n, tree today to pick buckeyes, foil, and was injured fatally. He died m White Cross hospital. He hnd been visiting an aunt, Mr.s. Fred Carney. With his parents, the youth had ccmc to Columbus Saturday to visit Mr.s. Carney and to call on Frank Mock. 304 Tappan street, nn uncle, who Li confined to the same hospital with a fractured skull, suffered Tues- day when he fell from a ladder while painting. Funeral .services will be held In Sa- cred Heart church, probably Tuesday, with burial In St. Joseph's cemetery 'RESCUE KIDNAPED CHILDREN HaiiRshow, Sept. strange battle Sca between aroused peasants aided by rates, resulted in the rescue today of ten at acc off raided Peihsiang. the village yesterday, taking off authorized WAS maintained which the buccaneers everv child in school. Not onlv did the peasants and police save tei chil- dren, but they killed four of the pirates and captured three One of the three pirate craft were sunk but the other two, carrying 20 children, fled. One chiM was killed. EVEN MONEY BET BY TIME SERIES READY TO START NEW YORK. Sept. Jack Dovlc. nroadway betting commissioner. tcnlght, quoted world .-erics odds as -5 to 5 ngninst Detroit and II to 10 against. Chi- cago. Tills would mean trial a person betting on the Cubs would pi-ice 54 against 55 and one belling or. Detroit would place Ml against J10, or sums In that ratio. Doyle said he-believed that by the time the series started it- would be practically an even money bet. Doyle said he himself favored the Cubs because of their pitching and, fielding strength. er'n; cohf etecce; gime.'iTular'f Virginia-'; "Count" Luslig, 'Wanted For Counterfeiting Arrested In Pittsburgh Pittsburgh. Sept. halt 'dozen alert federal -agents corralled the fugitive Robert V. Miller, alias "Count" 'Viktor Lustlg. wanted on counterfeiting charges, today by tha r-lmplc expedient of running their nutornablle Into his. The who escaped Sep- tember 1 by sliding .down a rope of bed sheets from the'. federal house of detention In New York, had been in Pittsburgh four days. He was facing trial In New York on coun- terfeiting charges, and authorities said lie "had a record of arrests all over the country. C. F. Flcrstone. head of Pitts- burgh division of the bureau of in- vestigation, said Miller was trying to make n getaway to Chicago when captured. He will be returned to New York shortly, agents said. The department of Justice rr-.cr. and secret sen-ice agents led by Fred Gruber. chief operative In the Pittsburgh office, made the arrest. Fiorr.tonc described Miller as "an international confidence man of 40 irrcsts and 40 Rliases." The federal men locked the wheels of. their automobile with the wheels of the fleeing car and stopped It. William Sullivan. 24. of Pittsburgh, the alleged driver, was held on a charge of harboring R fugltUe. Gruber described the arrest by saying secret service agents knew the "Count" had a "woman friend" In Pittsburgh and suspected he might come this way. "He has had this connection hero for two years and we. set a Gruber said. Southeastern. ......._____...._, day. a 14-9 Oklahoma's Soocors. first ..'start' under 'the oejj; Biff .scored triumph over Colorado Detalls and scores of Sport Page. Citizens and Offer .to Finance Searchlight SCHEDULE AT BOLIVAR; Cincinnati. Sept-. Ohio State Medical nswclntlon will open Its roth nnnunl meeting Here Oct. 2, with hotel 'reservations indicating at- tendance will the 1100 mnrX id last year. The summary of operations Llebcr. Jr.. U. S. engineers. HOVER AHKA Atwoort W. L. Johnson Construction company continued their operations on dike embankment fill, borrow pit exc.ivatton. and con- itructlon ol a diversion channel. Em- for the past In charge of operations, follows: ployment at the site average 33 men dully. No change In operations is planned for next week. Ecuch Clly K'.scn- terg   modeled along the lines of .the workij, onductcd by the buslnc-ss.men served on the survey, should function; is a permanent unit." financed v.bjr.j oluntary contributions of "citizens nd to Xeep'-the Ight "spotted', on the need permanent program of lomlcsl and business-like- Rovenlp-; mcnt." Ths survey WB.I created by GOT-; -rnor Davey with the announced .....Ion of-reducing tne. cost of'. government. In a. scries of; .he survey hns'recommenced ustments in state government ties and organization :lt would save J14.000.000 a.year. reccmmer.datlons are to JOHNSON'S SON HURT Washington. Sept. Johnson. Jr., son of the ftmou baseball pitcher, suffered severe cut early today when his automobl crashed Into a. telephone pole 1 Ecthcsdn. Washington subur Johnson fell asleep while driving home after working all'night. FILM COMEDIAN WIDOW SECOND Florence. Ariz.. Sept. Stanley Laurel, comedian.. M-. Virginia Ruth Rogers..of wood, were married In the county courthoure here today. The actor and hU .bride companied by a large party ol Laurel and Mrs. Rogers. Ho widow, previously were married Mexican ceremony at, Agua In April. 1934. the nounced at that time. His divorce from Mrs. LoU on Oct. 11." 1933, final then and he, was quoted.RS ing: "My bride and J will not M-'u, surric our marital until INEWSPA'FER;   

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