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Zanesville Signal Newspaper Archive: October 20, 1931 - Page 1

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   Zanesville Signal, The (Newspaper) - October 20, 1931, Zanesville, Ohio                             I H Prints the News THE ZANESVILLE SIGNAL the Truth VOL. LII, No. 148 ZANESVILLE, 0., TUESDAY EVENING. OCT. PRICE: THREE CENTS HUNT WOMAN ACCUSED OF BRUTALLY KILLING TWO OTHERS GOVERNOR WHITE ISSUES PROCLAMATION FOR OHIO'S TRIBUTE TO EDISON Brother Says She Did It and Stuffed Bodies in Luggage As Found j_cs. Angeles. Oct. of. corpse were found distributed in the women found jammed Into two three pieces of baggage. The body of trunks and a suit case at a railroad I Mrs. who roomed with Miss station here set police today on the I Samuelsoii who had been her corr.- r.rs'l of a murder mystery in which panion earlier In Alaska was not it "was suspected, there figured a rmi'tilated. Bullets apparently ccused woman of i-iolent and perhaps Jealous I death, temper. Authorities trailed two women on The authorities had tracers out, for j a train bound for Phoenix today, the detention of Mrs. Winnie Ruth j but when the train arrived at Phoe- Judd. the 27-year-old wife of a Los i nix, they found no trace of the physician, Dr. William E.! woman. Hoover Addresses Thousands at Yorktown Jv.dd. Mrs. Judd was route to Phoenix. Ariz. believed en That she might prove a valuable solving the killing of 20-year- Hedvig samuclson, an invalid teacher, and 35-year-old Mrs. Leroi. a nurse friend of Miss Ssmurlscri. was deduced from a story Mrs. Jucld's brother told a detective. According to the latter, the brother. D. J. McKinnell said Mrs. Judd had him she killed the "for a good reason." The "killings had been done in phoenix. Ariz., according to informa- tion the authorities quickly gleaned niter they found the bloody baggage here yesterday. The body of Miss Samuelson had been dissected, and it appeared, quite expertly. Parts of the iCILLER 'SPOTTED' DIES TRYING TO SHOOT WAY OUT New York, Oct. policeman's "camera that spotted a man wanted in the killing of a policeman, liaU resulted today In death of a gang chief, the capture of a sur-pect- ctl .ally, and serious wounds for three detectives in a sensational gunfight with three men trapped in a room- ing house. One other man, who shot and bat- tered his way out of the trap with his fists, still was at large. The dead gangster was Eurico Bat- taglia, wanted since 1928 for the murder of Patrolman Jeremiah Bros- nan. The wounded detectives: Guido Pesango, 27. James De Fer- rari, 39, and Edward Wllli. 43. Patrolman John P. Broderlck. had known Battaglia, but Battaglia did not know the policeman. Broderlck saw Battaglia enter a house with two other men. He tele- phoned for reenforcements. Pesango and Wllli went to the sec- ond floor of the four-story brown- stone rooming house, while Broderlck and Ferrari waited at the foot of the stairs. The landlady screamed a .f-vnxning to Battaglia" and ids ccm- .k-anlons. A pistol in each hand, he fan out of a second-floor rear room, firing. His bullets brought down Willi and Fesagno. Ferrari ran up the stairs after the gunmen. He, too, fell as bullet pierced his chest. After TJe Ferrari, ran Broderick, firing as he climbed the stairs. Five bullets from hJs pistol and Battaglia rolled down the stairs. Meantime they had held her brother and obtained from him what they claimed her SICTY t'u'.t tlv; had killed ihe women. McKinnell. a 20-year-old student, was questioned for hours before this alleged statement was obtained from FORGOT PRAYERS HE WAS SO BUSY INSPECTING CHAIR What the "good reason" mentioned by McKinnell may have been could only be Imagined, for he had not re- vealed anything tangible. The only clues the "police had were that the two dead women had been neighbors of Mrs. Judd in Phoenix. Moreover, according to their information Mrs. Judd and Mrs. Leroi had been em- ployed in the same clinic in Phoenix. Evidence tended to indicate that Mrs. Judd had shipped the baggage Sun- day night from Phoneix for Los An- geles and perhaps had followed it in automobile. McKinnell, according to the author- ities, expressed the hope that his sister would get away, adding he wished he could give her money to aid in this. Mrs. Judd's husband told the authorities, upon questioning, that his wife had seemed friendly with the two dead women but "she had a ter- rible though he doubted she was Involved In any crime. Mc- Kinnell supported the doctor's word concerning Mrs. Judd's temper. "I wouldn't say she was crazy" he was quoted as saying, "but she has an Insane temper." Her letters lately had been Inco- herent, he said. When he asked Judd if he knew anything to be wrong with Mrs. Judd, Judd refused to ad- mit he knew of any difficulty, Mc- Kinnell was quoted as sayjng. j Police said McKinnell told them' his sister telephoned him yesterday and asked him to accompany her to the railroad, station. "She told me she wanted to pick two trunks there and to take them out and dump them In the authorities quoted the youth as saying. When she couldn't get the trunks at the station, he drove her downtown and let her out of the car, he told nolice. "The thing I hate moat about McKinnell related' to reporters, "is that it will kill my motherif she finds out about it. She is an invalid as it is. "As for my sister, I hope she gets away. I wish I had 3500 to give her." McKinnell said he was a senior at the University of Southern California and that he lived In Santa Monica. Dr. Judd said he knew the slain women and that with his wife, he lived near them in Phoenix. j "They were friends of my j he said, "and I don't believe she could have done such a thing to them." The suitcase, with its gruesome baggage, was not found until six hours after the trunks were opened. In addition to part of one body, it Turn to Page Two BOTH BRITAIN, FRANCE REFUSE TO PUT TROOPS IN MANCHURIA Japan Withdraws Protest Against U. S. at League Meet Thrice a Bride Copyright, 1931, NEA Service. Inc. Transmitted by Telephoto. Marking the 150th anniversary of the surrender of Lord Cornwollis to General Washington at Yorktown, Va., President Hoover is seen here in his address yesterday, urging the nation to have "confidence, strength and cour- age." Seated in the front row are General Henri Petal r.. French World War hero, and General John J. Pershing. Boston, Oct. Belanski. 33. stolid Polish farmhand, was so interested in the mechanism of the electric chair that he died early to- day, forgetting to say his prayers. j T CM AM V I CI T Witnesses assembled in the death j JMLiLljLJ Vl 11 VI iM 1 house at state prison were astonished when the condemned man smiled pleasantly at them and then Inter- estedly inspected the electrodes and other "equipment of the lethal instru- ment. Belanski. doomed to death for mur- dering an elderly couple with a cud- gel, was to have repeated prayers in tho death room after the Rev. Ralph FORMER HUSBAND TO WIFE'S HOME Had "Earmarks" To Prove Claims El.vria, O.. Oct. in this" vicinity will do their road work by daylight hereafter. Two fighters, training for forth- "coming bouts, were jogging along a road near the Grafton state prison farm by moonlight. Farmers in the locality jumped at conclusions. They telephoned the prison that two escaped con- victs had shed their uniforms and were "running away in their un- derwear." Guards at the prison Jumped into an auto. Armed to the teeth and with the siren screaming they sped down the road and overtook the runners. Both were hand- cuffed. "If you don't think I'm a fight- pleaded one of the pair, "look at my cauliflower ear." They were released. BANK CASHIER SHOT BY CRAZED BANDITS One of Stick-ups Also Killed; Taken and Cash- ier Slain When He Refused More Menomonie, Wis., Oct. bank Echafer, one of the -oank employes, troops into Manchuria and has! refused, the government was] HOOVER'S REVIEW NAVY MAY CHANGE BUDGET CUT PLAN Washington, Oct. 20. President Hoover returned to the white House at a. m., today from his week- end visit to the Torktown sesquicen- tenial celebration. Annapolis, Md., Oct. Hoover "debarked here from the bat- tleship Arkansas today. He proceed- ed at" once to Washington by motor. President Hoover brought back today a new impression of the navy which may have a bearing on the current budget dispute. Three nights at sea and his dual review of the destroyer and scouting fleets in York river yesterday gave him an impressive knowledge of the navy viewpoint. He mingled continuously with high iiiaval officers, including Secretary of Navy Adams, who Joined the ship at I Yorktown last night. While the budget may not have been discussed, all members of the president's party were impressed by the great navy show. Rarrell, prison chaplain, but he spoke not a word. Four heavy shocks were required to kill Belanski. Mr. Hoover, in effecting his econ- Ada. O., Oct. Danner, 64. Umy program, ordered slashed from the navy's budget. Na- val officials sought to lessen this fig- ure, and the matter is being arbitrat- ed by Budget Director Roop and a budget officer of the navy depart- ment. Undoubtedly the president's week end trip will result in further conferences between Mr. Hoover and Adams. THEFT OF GOODS; Late Tuesday afternoon police and j detectives -.vsre questioning Daniel B. Watson. 04. Crooksvi'.le. relative to the thcit of a large quantity of mer- handlse from Pennsylvania rail-; platform a few days ago ar.d the i may brlnp about the ar- rest other men implicated ii "lie f.licrt.s. W.ttscn was arrested at o'clock i nt the Pennsylvania by Detcc- i fives Str-.ttr. and Warner and B. O. William H. Hicc. today after going to the home of his former wife. Bertha, dur- ing the night and allegedly breaking down a door and smashing furniture with an axe. Danner was shot by Roy AUerding. his brother-in-law, according to offi- cers, when he aroused the home of his divorced wife, threatening her i and Allerding with death. j The couple was divorced about a held that Allerding was instrumental nd a. m. to i force "an accounting." j Allerding shot through a door at j the infuriated man. the bullet strik-1 inq his heart, according to a cor- i oner's investigation, not held. 1 T> iin turning his wife against him and AKKl'SIrl) r 11 K went to the house- about 1 i L.U i iv cashier was slain by three crazed bandits today and one of their com- panions was killed as they fled from the Kraft State bank after a hold up- The dead were James Kraft, assist- ant cashier and a bandit, tentatively identified as "Dudley." A dozen customers and officials a nit employes of the bank were ter- rerlzed by the violence of two of the bandits. A crowd of approximately 50 per- sons gathered in the street outside the bank was held at bay by a third bandit who wielded a machine gun. The bandits looted the cash, draw- ers of the tellers' cages and the vault. Apparently they believed there was more money available. One of the bandits stood over young Kraft and demanded, more money. .Kraft told them there wasn't any more. "You're retorted the bandit. Kraft denied it. The bandit then pulled the trigger, shooting Kraft through the shoulder and side with a .45 calibre pistol. The other bandit seized Mrs. A- W. MORGAN-CO HOLDS STRAITSVILLE MAN ON LIQUOR CHARGE Morgan county authorities have confiscated their first automobile fol- lowing a liquor raid. Searching for whiskey Monday on a farm in "Bristol township several miles east of McConnelsville, Sheriff Lewis Adrean and Deputy V. A. Van Horn ran across a parked automobile bearing identification on the tire cover which indicated its owner was from New Straits.ville. The machine, a light coupe, was searched and six gallons of alleged whiskey were found, whereupon the officers arrested Albert Dishon, 25, the driver. His home is at New Straitsville. and the two. using her for a shield against the crowd, made their way to their motor car where one of them was killed by gunfire. The third bandit, with short bursts of fire, escaped. Tokio. Get. has esked both France and Great. Britan to send troo; been informed today. Kenkichi Ycshizawa, Japan's rep-1 resent-ative at the League of Nations council in Geneva, told cabinet au-1 thorities here the information was; given him by Aristide Briand of i France, president of the council. Direct negotiations by China and Japan leading to settlement of their i troubles in Manchuria appeared a' step nearer today. Japan's demands for direct settle- ment which she insists must be ac- cented before she will withdraw1 troops in Manchuria were being pre- pared by Foreign Minister Baron Shidehara. And official reports from the Can- ton government were that a new for- eign minister was prepared to open direct negotiations. The government received notifica- tion from the Japanese consul at Canton that Eugene Chen, foreign minister of the Canton government, informed the consul he was succeed- ing C. T. Wang as Chinese foreign minister and would be prepared for direct negotiations. If the report is true, it means that Canton and Nanking have called off preparations for civil war to cooperate in the Manchurian settlement. Of- un- ASKS STATE TO OBSERVE HOUR OF LAST RITES ON WEDNESDAY People of Ohio Will Bow in Respect to Native Son THREE MEN AND WOMEN HELD AS ROBBER SUSPECTS Huntington, W. Va., Oct. persons, two of whom were said to be wanted on charges of robbery in tip- per Sandusky, Ohio, were in police custody here today. Tbe four persons, captured in a po- lice--raid on an apartment here Mon- day night are Lewis Short, 30, of HuntinMxm; James Hartley, 30, of Detroit, Harry M. Myers, 34, of "De- troit, and Doris Bennett, 23, of Wai- burn, Mich. Another woman was said to be un- der arrest in Akron, O., but author- ities would not disclose her' name. Another man was sought here. Firearms, explosives and thousands of dollars worth of merchandise was found in the raided apartment. The raiding party Included Chief of Police L. E. Scherry, of Upper Sandusky, O.; Sheriff L. Weatherholtz, of Wyandot county, O., and Chief of Police Ben Robinson, of Huntington. An arsenal containing a sawed-off shotgun, three pistols, 200 sticks of dyanimte, 50 dynamite caps and a bottle of nltro-glycerine. was seized. Other articles taken were two large trunks, 12 traveling bags. 15 Kodaks, 30 fountain pens, 200 pairs of women's gloves, 20 men's overcoats, neckties, shoes, shirts, hats, women's clothing and jewelry. Two electric drills and an assort- ment of hammers, screw drivers, soap and fuses also were found. The Ohio officers said Short and Myers were wanted in connection with two drug store robberies at Upper Sandusky. Although most of the ider> ficiaJs here withheld comment til receiving confirmation of the re- port from Nanking, capital of the Nationalists government of President Chiang Kai-shek. to charges of possessing and trans- jc porting liquor. He was released on j 1 VT1 1 16-YEAR-OLD Sheriff Adrean said today that he had long suspected liquor operations j adjoining McCon- j and Detroit firms. A N GETS PROVISIONAL JOB WITH STATE Withdraw Protest Washington, Oct. diplomatic drama ended happily last night when Ambassador Ktsuji Debuciii of Japan brought Secretary of State Stimson tidines from the Tokio foreign office that "it no longer opposed American representation on the league council at Geneva. Debuchi's message meant that Prentiss Gilbert, American cunsul at Geneva, could continue his efforts in the league council to bring peace to Japan and China without feeling that he was an intruder. But it meant more. It meant that the Japanese ambassador in Washington had taken a long won. There Is drama in diplomacy as well as.in war. On a concealed stage. Debuchi, for nearly a week, had been the central figure in a play, tbe end- ing of which could" not be foretold. He had staked his reputation on his judgment. Tokio believed Gilbert had right in the league council. Turn to Page Two Columbus, O.. Oct. White in a proclamation today called upon people of Ohio to pay appro- tribute to the life and achieve- ments of Thomas A. Edison Wednes- day afternoon, when the funeral for the inventor is to be held. The governor urged that citizens lay aside their ordinary pursuits be- tween and 4 p. m., that flags on public buildings be flown at half- staff and that public schools conduct special exercises commemorating his life and works. In addition to this, the governor suggested that as soon as possible appropriate services be held in the churches of the state, and that all clubs and civic organizations pay sim- ilar tribute. The governor's proclamation, ad- dressed to the people of Ohio, read in part: "Thomas Alva Edison is dead. "Emperor without crown, king without scepter, minister without first citizen of tho world. IT1 11 11 I T O r "Born in our beloved Ohio. It' Is I H. 1 Li Iv U 1 H Bitting that Ohio shall claim him as Harold Roberts, Newark youth. Is returned to Zanesville Tuesday afternoon by Chief of Police Joseph D. Pctet and Patrolman Hay Plerson after his arrest in Chillioothe Monday evening when he was found in pos- session of automobile from this city. Roberts was arrested for Zanesville For the third time, Eleanor above, grand ocsra star, is a bride. This time the "lucky man in Major Charles Strong, wealthy widower. Miss Painter has besn a favorite in EuroBe and New York for years. STOLEN MACHINE FOUND ON MONDAY police when he was found in pos- session of a Chevrolet coupe bearing license No. B9-586 which was stolen from Lloyd D. Buck. Zane station Monday afternoon. The automobile had been left on South Fifth street. Another instance of necessity of furnishing the police department with at least one new police car Was no- ticed Tuesday morning when Chief Petet was forced to return home and use his own for the trip to Chllllcothe for prisoner. his valley has been passed, and that his remains shall have eventually a final resting place in our soil. "We bow our heads to genius; we stand awestricken in the presence of superhuman achievement and accom- plishment. Tet genius, achievement and human accomplishment must yield in the end to the summons of Almighty God. "Along with tbe rest of the world, Ohio mourns the passing ol her na- tive son." Many at Bier West Orange, N. J., Oct. world, to whose progress comfort and. efficiency Thomas Alva Edlaon's Iri- jveative 'contributed, today the AWAIT CALL FOR G.O.P. NATIONAL COMMITTEE MEET Washington, Oct. A call for the Republican national committee to meet here probably Oec. 15 Is to be issued within a few days by Sena- tor Simeon Fess. chairman EDAM DTTPWQlpicions. Although the officers search- the farm near where Dishon was Jamss Flannigan. of MeConnels- they were unable to find ville, past commander of the Ameri- ny evidence of bootlegging. can Legion of Morgan county, was I Confiscation of Dlshon's car marks i provisionally named second assistant Burns sustained Friday were fatal the first time that Morgan county i state purchasing agent, with head- i SUFFERED r'RiUAi Alierdlng was Tuesday morning to Miss Lura Orvet- officers have taken a machine ta Adams, 16-year-old high school contraband following- an arrest, 'girl at the home of her parents. Mr. fnd Mrs- Prea ncar KK1! fEVlT I? A T H P P Mra' rieu chalj" f A 1 11 Ei ly She suffered burns about the facs fcflf T UV body in -n of J} I I UU IfliEcne which she V.T.S pcxiring on n fir? .store. Surviving the WHO HANftFH Pareiite Hnd one sistcr- f f J.1VJ JLil-il jThelma, and her grandfather. W. S. Akron. O.. Oct. of IKickman of Sprntt. i Joe Fugeciy. 45. and his son. Jos, F services wil, oeicld Ralph Kress. 20. Lore City. O.. was 23 oftcn Commented on the secluded i o'clock Thursday afternoon at tl r.rrcstccl at the same time for train i llves tne piltr ilved and todav :horr.e. Burial v.lll be at Rich Hill. riding. He was taken off n Baltimore in horrified tones cf the" men's pr-scsnger train. i deaths. THFFT i police believed the boy killed his jEiTfEiLi 1 1 f KIM A I i then hanged himself. A A OH i A bakery driver knocked today. There AJSUAKLl i deaths. j Police believed the boy killed his father, then hanged himself. A bakery driver knocked today. There was no response. He opened a door j F the older man dead on the Aboard SS .He De France, Oct. Oct. 20 The U. S. S. Akron her last inspection kitchen floor, two bullet wounds in j The He Ds France, carrying Premier j vital spots. The driver "looked Pierre Laval arid a distinguished pas- around further." In the basement senger list to New York, has been j quarters at Columbus, pending the 1 outcome of the civil service examina- Uon on Thursdav, according to word received in Zanesville today. The result of the civil service tests will iikely not be known for a week or 10 days' The recent resignation by reason of ill health of Fred W. Morrison. Zar.es- vi'.lc, who was appointed first as- sistant purchasing agent by Gover- cr White, brought about the change the department and the naming farmer and business man was urged! Or Fiannlgan as second assistant. The fcy L. B. Palmer, president of the Ohio; _D055 jef t vacant by Morrison's resig- Farm Bureau, before the farm nation was filled by promotion of the tsons conference of the Ohio district second ,-issistant, and the job of sec- Kiwanis convention here today. i or.d assistant purchasing agent placed In the interest of better economic: under civil service.' conditions for both parties, he ap-; Fl.innigan has been active in Dsm- to the business men to take; ocratic politics in Morgan county, keener interest in tho farmer's prob- nr.d prominent in the American Le- FINAL TRIBUTE OF PUBLIC TO MEMORY CLEVELAND MAN Cleveland. Oct. general public Wednesday morning will pay last respects to Samuel Mather, fi- nancier and philanthropist. Doors of Trinity cathedral will be open to the public from 9 a. m. til p. m. The Mather family ex- plained that due to the limited size of the cathedral the funeral services at p. m. will be private. The coffin Is to be closed before it is taken from Mr. Mather's home in Bratenahl village. It will not be opened in the cathedral. Services will consist merely of the formal Episcopal church ritual, which will be conducted by Bishop Warren Lincoln Rogers of Gambler, O. There will be no sermon or eu- logy of the individual. City council unanimously adopted a resolution of tribute and condol- ence last night asserting. "The com- muntv has lost one of its most out- i tional Hoover has made his decision by then, j Senator Fess will retire when the president is ready to change. He took the asisgnment on a temporary basis. Mark L. Reques. new Republic- an national committeeman from Cal- ifornia, and Henry M. Robinson. Los Angeles banker, are under considera- tion. Mr. Hoover's troubles with his national chairman, particularly with Claudius Huston, have made him cautious this time. The national committee meeting will signalize tho official opening of sought a tribute commensurate his services. As thousands ol persons Illed past the bier today lor a Ilnal look at the kindly, wrinkled face, plans were madp to switch off every electric light In the state ol Hew Jersey for one minute tomorrow night In memory of their Inrentor. In New York Mayor James J. Walk- er was expected to call for a .similar of bulbs on gay Broadway- as: well as other city for sixty; seconds. Detroit planned to stop --all street cars and buses and municipal activ- ities for a minute and Washington two preparations for the campaign to re- elect president Hoover. The meeting will decide where the 1932 national convention is to be held. Cleveland and Chicago are regarded as leading prospects. Finances will be an important prob- Flags throughout New Jersey and in New York were flown at half mast today. They will remain lowered until after the funeral tomorrow. Plans for the funeral have not been divulged, except for the information it will be private and will be at the Edison home at tomorrow after- noon. will be at the Boeedale cemetery. East Orange. Later the body may be taken to O., Edison's birthplace. It is expected the officiating min- ister will be the Eev. Stephen Har- bin, pastor of the Methodist Episco- pal church at Maplewood, an old friend of Edison. Edison's former employes, gathered iinder the eyes of her builders today. the son's lifeless body hung from a the scene of a big jewel robbery, navy mei! here awaited the: rope. A pistol lay on'the damp floor! Mrs. R. J. Anderton, ol Newport, iormn! acceptance cf the ship. beneath him. R. I., reported to ship's officers that hey've lived there five she hat! been robbed of in ibors said, "but no one seemed ti'Lken from her stateroom. She now niij'thinf; nbou them. They had left the jewels in an unlocked Etronje people." drr.wcr while absent from her cabin, lice could find no Indication of 1 The purser wirelessed to New York very hull, inspect Ins; the metal frame neighbors sai work, wires, nets nr.d giving the gas j to know any coils a. final goinj? over before Good- j were corporation declared i Police iho thip ready for delivery. I relatives who could be notified. If the inspection is completed, the acceptance made and weather are wiliinp, the rlre from municipal airport j ROBBERY ATTEMPT CUYAHOG A COUNTY day n'cht for the trip to Ukehurst. "At present the farmer's dollar isjsnowr. in Zanesville. He was for- worth only 57 cents in industrial pro-; rr.erlv assistant purchasing agent, for ducts." Palmer declared. He also Chandler Motor Co.. Cleveland, spoke in favor of partially supporting education by means of other thar. property taxes as an aid to the farm- Akrn- MURDER RESULT OF poiice. and It was expected detec- tives would meet tbe Ilr.er to inves- tigate when she reaches port. Medina, O., Oct.. was: .advanced today as the motive behind j VALUATIONS DOWN S15 the Ohio Wcsleyan university has teen made by the Camesle i Halliday. who had been beaten to AuMtor John Zangerlo. Foundation, it was nnncunced to-i death, was reputedly wealthy ar.d j The new valuations v.-.-l force a rv.t DID J A' NOTICE- scp.scn is a good time to i- on sweet girl's cheek? yeah? "extremely paid. His ASKS BUSINESS TO TAKE INTEREST IN FARM PROBLEMS Columbus, O.. Oct. cf the social distance between the. Icms and welfare. crier, since Its formation. He is well HARD WINTER MAY BE DUE Coin. O.. Oct. early winter of unusual severity rr.ay be approach- BREAD LINES ARE CONDEMNED; MAKE: "SHOW" OF RELIEF Washington, Oct. lines.: soup kitchens and other spectacular; of relief were condemned to-; by the president's organization; unemployment relief, as destruc-: tive of the independence nnd self-: respect of the unemployed. Distribution of focci and clothing, should be private and with a vlewj to individual needs, a resolution. adopted by the committee on ad-; r. ministration, of relief, said, adding, that the unemployment situation is a "major crisis "that requires the ac-' tive participation of all public and; private organizations." Tho committee refused to handle BELIEVE YOUTH SUFFERING FROM INFANT PARALYSIS County health authorities are con- lem. Depression has hit party cof- j at 8 a. m. in the library of his fers. Some employes were dropped laboratory, where his body lies amid at Republican national committee i the evidences ol his lifetime accom- heaciquarters recently to reduce ex- j plishments, to pay their final fe- penses. Democrats have just anonunc- spects. ed a "victory fund." The public was to be admitted later. Twenty thousand persons view- ed the body yesterday and it is ex- pected that many more will do so to- day. The body will rest in state un- til 11 p. m. A guard of honor of old Edison employes stood at the head and foot of the bronze coffin. But absent from. the mourners today John Ott, in- and employe who had fronted today by a malady which j teeR associated with Edison fifty ma.v develop into infantile paralysis, i years. Otfs death yesterday in his The case is that of a seven-year-old Glen Ridge home was believed _ boy named Gunion, who resides hastened bv news of his employer s er. Two other conferences, one on busi- ness relations arid the other on public affairs, were concurrently with the farm conference. business standards and honest j juciijir.z from the business leaders were urged by Harry; mnJjc ty 150 s-warrns of bees on tbe Van Horn, manager of tiie Columbus' Shaaiey farm, near here. JL Bctter Business bureau, before the "nave waxed up their fTTAA7 fall, several weeks ;DLr (JK1A surolus cotton and wheat held by the federal farm board, on tbe ground that this was outside Its field. It did j not. however, oppose such measures; by regular relief organizations. Bread lines anc! soup kitchens con- ducted as a form of advertising by; commercial organizations were cic- nouncec! as "objectionable" and the; committee said they "should be con-' cicrnncd bv public opinion." I Fred C. Croxton. of Columbus. O.. is chairman of the committee. his parents at White Cottage, Dr. Esatrice T. Hagen, county: health commissioner, investigated the cn.se Tuesday and ordered the house i under quarantine. The residence, i hov.-tver. will not be carded until the di.sea.se is positively identified. Tne health commissioner said to- duv that although the child is of; school age. none of the school chil- clren !n White Cottage had been ex- posed because the boy was kept from j classes before he contracted what j is believed to be infantile paralysis, i The disease, which Is more preva- i lent in the spring end summer, is not unusually uncommon in the fall' and winter. i jjis wheel chair and crutches were to bo brought here today to be placad fecside tho coffin in rr.ute evidence of his service. SEEKING NEW I AIR Birmingham, Ala.. Oct. j James Doolittle landed at a. m.: 1C. 3. T.) after a three-hour and six- rr.ir.ute flight from. Washington. He i !s enroute from. Ottawa, Canada, on; SHUEERTS IN RECEIVERSHIP New York. Oct. Shubert Theaters corporation, owner, lessee or operator of nearly 70 legitimate thea- ters throughout the country, went into the hands of receivers today. The complaint was brought by a Chicago firm to which the Shubcrts owe S5.000. Federal Judge Francis G. Caffey appointed the Irving Trust Co. and Leo Shubert as joint receiv- ers. A document accompanying tbe complaint stated that the corpora- tion" had liabilities of S10.749.687. mostly secured by realty mortgages. It was estimated complete liabili- ties are S17.000.000. The Shuberts are said to have an investment of S30.COO.CCO. t GK.rt.iN OLDEST RESIDENT OF IS DEAD business relations conference. _____ ._. Governor Site. President Karris.' ahead o' the usual time, two signs j District Governor A. A. Schramm! ahlch beekeepers say ari; Cleveland, Oct. and 25 minutes later, and at (E. S. T.) took off from the cap- ita! for Birmingham. and Charles Milton Ncwcomb. humor-iearjy ar.ri hard winter. j reputedly wealthy Ravenna .a. 1st will be speakers at the governor's j jn the csAt 25 years the bees have j bootlegger, today was free or. banouct tonight. j done this" onlv three times, before jucsrment on a writ ot itho v.nr.rccerient.-ri rcM wave of 1911- i rornus filoc' bv his attcrr.eys 18. the winter of 1912-13. and again'..... In 1927-28. Oct. Patrick J. rep-ated to be the oldest msn de-elancl, was dead today at the CHANGE STATION The venerable Irishman whO< twice ELECTROCUTED Brvan. O.. Oct. working i attempt to block his deporta-j IGRAF ZEPPELIN ON Federal Judge Samuel K. took the case tjr.tler advisement following Cc-lum'ous. O.. Oct. to chr.nee its freight ar.d passenger station at Black Run. Muskingum county, from agency to non-agency, was sskeci of the public utilities com- mission by the Pennsylvania railroad. MANSLAUGHTER Elyria. O.. Oct. Lacross. 19, went on trial here today on a charge of manslaughter. Ke was al- to have run down and killed s-.cu fhv.pe, 50, in his automobile las! July. Wil. ali taxing districts in the coun- en wiring at the O. D. Mchrling i liam Wilford, missing the aged man ty. The city several days, went to the truble- j take a 12 j voted for Lincoln and who retained jhis interest in public affairs to the Idav of his death, dice! quietly while !he" slept. For rr.nnv years he v.-as icmploved at the old American House FAIR Fair tonight and Wednesday; slightly warmer in extreme south and extreme west portions to- night: llglrt frost in south pcrttor. tonight. v r ,'SPAPERf   

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