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Times Signal Newspaper Archive: March 24, 1959 - Page 1

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Publication: Times Signal

Location: Zanesville, Ohio

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   Times Signal (Newspaper) - March 24, 1959, Zanesville, Ohio                               IN U-ll I 14 I THE ZANESVILLE SIGNAL Press IVEA Teteptotos tntemmttomml 95TH 261 14 PAGES MARCH 1959 SEVEN CENTS OtUO-AUttk and pirtly cloudy centrtl tnd Yeitttilay'i High .............M Low 7 a.n..........M At a.m. Today .........M Youth Fails To Survive Death Trap British Student Wedged In Cave For 44 Hours England Oxford student Neil died today in a corkscrew-shaped death trap feet below the surface despite the heartbreaking attempts of hundreds of rescuers to pull him from the cave where he was trapped Sunday afternoon. The husky build that had led Moss more than two miles through the tortuous tunnels and crevices of Devil's Hole Cave proved his undoing. He was trapped in an 18-inch-wide lime- stone his broad shoulders jammed so tightly rescuers could not pull him out. His death was officially an- nounced 44 hours after he first became wedged inside the peak cavern in the Derbyshire hills. He became unconscious Monday and rescue efforts were redoubled but Chief Inspector William Sheffield announced at boy is Attempts were still being made to pull his body free from the crevice. Two doctors who crawled through the slimy blackness to keep vigil near the dying youth certified his death. One of them was RAF Flight Lt. John Carter who had piped oxygen into the limestone tomb in an effort to keep him alive. But at the desperate at tempts to keep Moss alive failed The foul air that had balked rescue attempts finally snuffed out his life. Hundreds of volunteers had rushed today to the a pop- ular tourist attraction outside this tiny but they were too late. Rescue teams reported the situation worsening constantly and Carter hastened back to the 40-foot cleft to listen for his la bored breathing. Police at nearby Buxton broad cast an appeal throughout north ern England for rescuers weigh ing 100-pounds or smal enough to wiggle into the where Moss was locked uncon scious in a standing position Hundreds responded but it wa no use. Moss entered the cave Sunday as part of an eight-man explor ing party. He wandered off alon and became stuck in the narrow passage he was exploring. DiSalle Makes Plea To End Death Penalty COLUMBUS Michae V. DiSalle drops his title as gov error for an hour to testify as a private citizen before House committee almost certai to vote down his proposal to abol ish capital punishment in Ohio. He appears before the House Judiciary Committee at 3 p.m. DiSalle was expected to mak a last-ditch plea for ending th death penalty by talking about th eight or 10 convicted murderer who staff the governor's mansion else leaves his wife and children in the care of murderer every he defending hi right to testify. DiSalle told newsmen he de cided to make the unusual person al appearance despite warning that it is a bad move politically Judge In Favor Of Gun Slingers WASHINGTON West ern judge thinks it might be good idea to allow some pcopl to wear as in the Old Wes Superior Court Judge Bartlet Rummel of tol a meeting of the National Rifl Association Monday that the increase of crime it migh well be said that it still man's best RECOVER EACALL JEWELS LONDON stolen last Wftditeada from the London Iwme of nwv tKStrtu Lauren was re count and by Monday. Spring Picnic Spring has certainly arrived in the Minneapolis area. To prove the the Pioneer G'.rls of one of the churches held their first picnic of the season Monday at Lake Harriet Micky happily indulges in eating a freshly roasted marsh- mallow at the picnic. The temperature was a pleasant 68 de- gress in the afternoon. TOWARD A CROWN' Fickle Persons Betrayed Jesus Oir Way To Cross The Rev. Karl pastor of Puritas Lutheran Church used the topic Toward a for his sermo at the second community Holy Week service held today at th Liberty The Rev. Mr. Mohrhoff is a former pastor ot St Bitter Fight Shapes Up On Foreign Aid WASHINGTON King iussein of Jordan meets today vith President Eisenhower and other high U.S. officials to assess the general situation in the Mid die East. Also high on the list for discus- sion are prospects for increased U.S. military and economic aid to Jordan. Hussein will lunch with the President at the White House fol- owing a morning conference with Acting Secretary of State Chris- tian A. Herter. Later the King and his aides meet with Under- secretary of State C. Douglas Dil James W. new foreign aid and Assistant Secretary William Rountree. Luke American Lutheran Church In his the Rev. Mr rtohrhoff described the succes- ion of fickle persons Christ me Nine Miners Burn To Death After Blast Tenn. dentally exploded dynamite or a coal gas blast were believed to day to have caused the deaths of nine miners in the Phillips-West Coal Co. mine near here. Tlie nine men died in an earth shaking explosion early Monday All of the victims were burned to flames apparently and fumes caught by that raced along the shaft after the Scrtt County Sheriff Dorsey Rosser said dynamite may have been set off accidentally. Authori ties alsc said the blast might been caused by a gas accumula tion or owl dust explosion. The victims included three o four partners who owned the mine. Four of bodies wer found face a mis out apparently indicating fhey were running. Fetteral inspectors immediately btfin an inquiry into tht diiMtor REV. KARL MOHRHOFF on His way to-the people offered Christ a crown o lm Sunday and a cross on Fr he 4'but Jesus didn change Good Friday's cros vas but a station on the way t iis crown. we look on the charac ers of this great drama and be come disturbed when we find s Turn To Page 6 Fire Sweeps 2 Homes In Brighton District Speaker Sees Tax Program In Jeopardy May Upset DiSallc's United Front COLUMBUS James A. speaker of the Ohio las cautioned Democratic com- mittee chairmen against what he termed being driven in- to the united front far Mi- chael V. DiSalle's tax program. Lantz said at- tempts are being made to and by playing urban against rural the Senate against the House and the Legis ature against the Administration With some the com mittee chairmen agreed to push as many tax bills as possible ou of committee this week. Chairman Francis F. Reno of the House Industry and Labor 'Committee balked at first when Lantz asked the bil extending the temporary 39-week eligibility for state jobless pay be sent to the House floor after only one hearing this week. But Lantz pleaded that the pres cnt law expires April 4 and eligi bility will drop to 26 weeks if Di Salte's bill is not passed by then Reno agreed to rush Larntz requested early For the governor's bills to boos horse race betting taxes and abol ition of the state Liquor Board. Other legislative Capital in a rare move for a was to testify personally today before the House judiciary Committee trying to save his proposal to enc the death penalty from being killed by the committee. The Ohio Information arch-opponents of thi supplemental unemployment bene fits was to hold a trustees meeting today to decide on one o two lines of To contcs the bill in or to petition for a people's vote on the issue Senate Majority Lead er Frank W. King threw cold water on the Republi can proposal to pass an cmcrg ency bill setting the present law aside for 120 days to allow im mediate payment of Aid to DiSallc and Leg 'slative leaders agreed that a irecedcnt-breaking ribbon1 committee of seven House anc seven Senate members should be formed to work on his 000 appropriation for local schoo aid biggest chunk in the bien nial budget next to highways. The joint committee is expected to consider changing the Schoo Foundation Program formula which DiSalle says gives too much money to rich school dis tncts. Missile Men On The Move Flames Wreck Nearby Garage Nursing Home Scorched On Westbourne Avenue Fire early this afternoon swept through two Brighton strayed a garage and scorched an adjacent nursing No one was reported injured. A general alarm sent all available equipment to Westbourne nue and Indiana street where a garage ignited from burning with the fire spreading to two and Mistering nursing home. Bernard who lives at 1512 Indiana said he was burning trash near his garage and that the building became Members of a specialized unit of the West Ger- man Army race to their stations at the firing ramp of an Honest John rocket in following the arrival of the first two of the missiles. The West German Army is scheduled to receive 260 of the 35 foot long missiles and 36 launching ramps. Special units are being trained to and fire the rockets. BUSINESS BRISK Zanesville Stores Braced For Easter Buying Rush Stores here braced today for a late rush to boy Easier goods. Some merchants said they believed the heaviest buying of to-wear things reached its peak last while others said they expected the demand to continue heavy during the next three days. Mild Weather Due To Linger In This Area The weather was mild here again today with the mercury climbing into the 60s and fore- casters said it will be a- little warmer tomorrow The mercury dipped to a low of 26 degrees at Municipal Air- port early today from a high of 64 yesterday and by noon it had climbed to according to Lake Central The weather bureau said the temperatures might climb as high as 70 during the late after- noon. QUAKE RETORTED SAN FRANCISCO A light earthquake rattled windows and dishes in parts of the San Francisco Bay area Monday night but there were no reports of damage. Florists and candy shops report- ed their business peak was yet to come. Some store owners described the seasonal business as ''unusual- ly and indicated that when the sales have been totaled the volume may exceed last year's Easter figure. Shopping bos been especially heavy in children's and millinery obviously for the tradition- al Easter bonnets. Zanesville public and parochial schools will be dis- missed for the Easter vacation aft cr classes on Wednesday afternoon but county schools will be in ses- sion one more day. All are scheduled to resume next Tuesday morning. Special chapel services arc be ing held in most of the either in auditoriums or class- rooms. Zanesvilic High will have a chapel Wednesday morning when the Baldwin-Wallace College choir will be heard. Flu Outbreak Classified As Epidemic COLUMBUS State Health Director Dr Ralph W. Dwork said today that the influ- enza outbreak in Ohio can nitely be classified as an epi- demic.0 Dwork said more cases were re sorted last week than for all of 1956. He said cases were re- ported to health officials last week. In allt a total of cases have been reported since Jan. Dwork said. He that the cases have been mild and have occur- red largely among youngsters. He said it apparently was the type and not the Mian strain which caused widespread absen- teeism in schools and industry two years ago. MOVES UPWARD Economists See Production In U.S. Setting New Record WASHINGTON Gov- ernment economists estimated today that the nation's total production of goods and serv- ices has climbed to a record annual rate. That is the unofficial but re- liable estimate for the first three months of 1959 now be- ing circulated among top-level government officials. It represents a gain of 11- billion dollars from the 453 bil- lion dollar rate of grow nation- al product in the last three months of because most prices have been the increase reflects a genuine spurt in the physical volume of production not just a mark- up in prices. The improvement is better than some government econo- mists had hoped for and it strengthens official forecasts for a 4S5-bi11km-dollar rate by the end of the year. new national output fig- ure also means that the econ- omy has grown to record It has expanded for four con- secutivc quarters following the sharp slide from September 1957 to April 1958 during the recession. Gross national prod- uct fell to a low rate of in the first quarter of Although the 464-billion-dollar estimate is still preliminary- March still has a week to economists are confident that when alt the final tallying is there won't be much change. factors behind the 1951 pickup buying of steel by factories whose inventories are depicted and who arc afraid there will be a prolonged steel strike this summer. of other inventories by many of whom pared them sharply in 1958. by consumers for goods and services of all kinds has been strong. are spending' a little more on construction of new factories and replacement of oW machines and tods. 3 Youths Held In Abduction Of Cab Driver Ind. teenagers were held at county jail here Monday night pending transfer to on fed cral charges of kidnaping a taxi cab driver. The Claude and Rolant were arrested in Indi- anapolis Sunday and brought here The FBI office in Indianapolis said the youths allegedly forccc Orvill a cab to drive them to Cambridge City Ind after threatening him with a knife. Ashwood was released with cab at Cambridge the FB and the youths hired anoth er cab to get to Indianapol where they were Akers was reported to be abscn without leave from the Army a Fort and had been staying with his brother in Day ton. nited. The fire virtually destroyed the garage and spread to the rear of his igniting the weather- boarding and causing considerable damage to rooms on the first and second The fire then swept to the house occupied by N. McMillian on the corner of Westbourne and causing similar damage. Dunn managed to drive hu automobile from the two-car ga age but its top Mared. Heat from the fire blistered the idirtf and broke storm windows at the nursing home operated by Vfrs. Jesse Holmes. It is located HI Westbourne just south the McMillan residence. McMillan is the owner of he Dunn-occupied residence as well as the house in which she ivts. H was reported that the looses were partially covered by insur a nee. The alarm was sounded at 1 p.m. Four minutes firemen were called to the Malinda street area to battle a grass fire. When the Brighton fire broke fire men were ordered from the grass ire to battle the blaze in the op- posite side of town. Then as the brush fire threaten- ed the Mercury Match plant and the Zancsville Community Sales stock one company was ordered from Brighton back to Malinda street and off duty fire- men were placed on a jtand-by Firemen were still battling the grass fire shortly before 2 Firemen at Newark also battlec a rash of grass fires Monday By p.m. Tuesday hey had answered five such calls On Monday they battled nine. One Newark fireman said the problem presented a serious threat to the city's safety inas- much as two fire trucks are pres- ently out of commission. Vlaemillan Optimistic Over Berlin VISIT JAPAN TOKYO the first time since before World War I Russian tourists began sightseeing in Japan today. The 21 Soviet 11 of them ar rived Monday under a trave agreement signed last year be- tween Japan and R King Hussein Meets With Ike WASHINGTON bitter floor fight shaped up in the House today over President Eisenhow er's pica for more foreign funds. A nip-and-tuck battle was in prospect as administration back- ers tried to persuade the House to override its appropriations committee and provide at least 100 million dollars of the 225 mil lion dollars requested by Eisen hower for the development loan fund. The committee last week by a 26-18 vote refused to provide a single penny in supplementa funds for the one of the three programs under which U.S economic aid is supplied to for eign countries. Democratic leaders are support ing the President on the aM issue But Democrats show signs of not wanting to get into line. They are angry over admin- istration efforts to label them for pushing for donwftic eW fftt donwatic A WASHINGTON British Minister Harold ian today that as long AS the Western allies stand firm on their principles free world has everything to gain from being ready to with Russia. He conceded in statement oil hit departure for London that 'the next few months will be a testing period for the whole fret But he exprtucd oontkfenct that the Wot in he The prime minister noted that ie had MI id upon hw arrival here Thursday for his conferences with President Eisenhower that the differences between the Western allies and Russia over Germany. Berlin so ought to be settled by negotiation and not by have no doubt that ao long as we firmly on our we shall free world has everything to gain rom bring ready to Maomillan told reporters at the National Airport. He said that the first phase of such negotiations was drawing to and end and are about to embark upon the next difficult decisions will have to be he said. we must be reasonable n we must also stand firmly on our rights and upon tht positions which we have a duty defend. will be a tough but one in which I believe we shall Macmillan pointed out that when he came here he had re- ferred to the necessity of ing a principle of inter-depend- ence among the Western allies the free world is to He said the three of and intimate with Eisenhower had strengthened his conviction that the keystone of the inter dependence was partnership between the United States and Great accompanied by British Foreign Secretary Selwyn Lloyd and other British was scheduled to reach London this evening after a seven-hour jet flight from Washington. The British leader held a half- hkour wind-up meeting with howcr late Monday at the White House. Both men described as highly successful their secluded weekend talks at Camp Md. Wemther Clsetcfcere clear cloudy Denver N cloudy Lot clear cloudy Ntw OriMM New IT 71 ctar   

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