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Willoughby News Herald Newspaper Archive: May 1, 1963 - Page 2

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Publication: Willoughby News Herald

Location: Willoughby, Ohio

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   News-Herald, The (Newspaper) - May 1, 1963, Willoughby, Ohio                               NEWSREEL pr s Distaff data from a nosey computer A nosey electronics computer was fed distaff data from a company's annual million individual bra and foundation sales. The machine came up with these facts worth mentioning about unmentionables: Women pay as much attention to bra patterns as they do hat styles. High School and college girls like frills and rib- bons. After the honeymoon, they choose more severe patterns. 4 MOST GIRLS PREFER wh-te bras throughout ths year, but choose red, blue, black and other colors for Christmas, Easter and Valentine's Day. You're average in silhouette if you measure, where it's im- portant, 35-25-35. If you live on the West Coast, chances are you're a wee bit larger. Brazilian ivins Lenin prize The Soviet government named Oscar Niemeyer of Brazil, one of T.aHn America's leading architects, today to receive one of four Lenin peace prizes. Niemeyer was the chief architect for Brazil's new capital Brasilia, and was a member of the team that designed the U.N. headquarters in New York. The winners receive 10.000-rubles about Scouts get Teamster cash Wed., I, 1963 HOFFA "Many Teamsters Union members were Boy Scouts. Many Boy Scouts one day will be the Teamsters Union mem- bers." With these words, Teamsters President James R. Hoffa Tues- day gave the Boy Scouts 000 on behalf of the union for construction of a bew Scout cen- ter in Washington, Adm. Arleigh A. Burke, for- mer chief of naval operations and Scout fund campaign chair- man in the capital area, accept- ed the gift and said Scout offi- cials were "deeply grateful." A day for feasting Rhode Island version of May Day has clambakes EDITORS NOTE: Stanley John- j made May baskets of boxes and; These feasts made Kremlin bao- son, veteran AP crepe paper. Then we popped in quets look like shoddy ways to eel- watched the Soi'iet Union uarade' presents-often only a candy bar efarate 'The May" as wecalkd it ,its military might through sneaked off at dawn 'cow's Red Square on May 1 on them on the doorknobs of our best were usually the ;six different occasions. Today he girls' homes before the neighbors made j was home watching another kind were awake. clam and falts clam- of May Day Island Girls, of coarse, competed to see eourse were Juices, version. Vho got the most. kiads of cereals, bacon, saus- By STANLEY JOHNSON Who 'hung'' a basket on pancakes-especially PROVIDENCE, R.I. was supposed to be a deep, own Johnnycakes lions participated in May Day ac- secret But it usually didn't take waterground cornineaL tivities in Moscow today where th juvenile detectives long to find out' Pies, of course and ooughnuts of I annual parade was held in Red While these capers were going all descriptions. Square. Here in Rhode Island, on, the grownups vrere heading for Profits went to the sponsoring S where the day is observed in an- the May breakfast 'organizations. other way, there were no parades but plenty of food. Soviet Premier Khrushchev got Fidel Castro for May Day; Rhode j Islanders got clamcakes. "Uttle Rhody" is the nation's' jlast stronghold of medieval May; Day traditions. But oldsters com- 1 plained today that even here the j ancient customs are dying. Ttere- Three Mentor youngsters are among thousands jwere May Day breakfasts but few who will represent their school safety patrols in Wash- JMay baskets hanging from door- ington, D. C. May 9 through 12. Thomas They'll see D.C. POUNDING WAVES Cold gusts up to 60 mph blew across Lake Erie last night slamming huge waves into the pilings at Gordon Park, Cleve- land. Spray shot nearly 100 feet in the air every time a big wave Mt. For faster service knobs. exiled Rhode Islander came [home to observe May Day after 'spending six May Days watching the masses in Red Square. The Yankee women had been busy baking pies and doughnuts and lights were on early in many I church and community kitchens throughout the state. The fra- grance of fresh-baking rolls and brewing coffee mingled with the apple blossoms and the sweetness of Alay. Hungry May-ers streamed to-' ward the long, laden tables. When I was a little boy, we Post for Bowles approved The Senate Foreign Relations Committee has approved Ches- ter Bowies' nomination for a second assignment as ambassador to India. Urges parcel post hike Sen. Olin D. Johnston, D-S.C., says he will introduce a bill to raise parcel post rates to bring hi about million more in revenue a year. U.S. canal for Nicaragua? President Luis Somoza of Nicaragua says he has confi- dential information from the United States that Kis country is getting top consideration for construction of an ocean-to-ocean canal with nuclear explosives. Somoza said the route being considered would make use of the Prinzapolca River near the center of the country. The United States has studied the possibility of digging a new canal with nuclear explosives to supplement the Panama Canal, which is not wide enough or deep enough to handle many modern ships. Thant starts 10-day trip U. N. Secretary General U Thant left by plane early today for a 10-day trip to Switzerland, Romania and Yugoslavia. Jayne divorces Mickey Post Office going ZIP The Post Office Depart- ment will put ZIP into its service nationwide starting July 1. ZIP Zoning Improvement Plan is designed to speed deliveries and save the gov- ernment about S15 million in the first year. Post office spokesmen in Mentor and Wick- liffe said today they've re- ceived no official notice of ZIP numbers, and ventured that local post office patrons probably won't be affected right away. Postmaster General J. Ed- ward Day explained Tuesday that the plan is principally aimed at encouraging big business firms to use the five- digit ZlP-coded addresses on the billions of pieces of mail they send out annually, THE PUBLIC should help, he said, by advising firms with which they do business such as telephone com- panies and magazine pub- lishers of their code numbers. Day said ZIP will eliminate up {0 "six of the ten sorting and handling steps now need- ed on mail sent by big busi- ness houses. Hospital chief eyes new pact Lake County Hospitals may have to ask for a contract with Ceauga County for emergency care of penniless patients if the volume brought here continues to rise. But officials hope Freshly divorced in Mexico, Jayne Mansfield arrived in Hol- lywood Tuesday night on tte arm of Nelson Sardelli, the Brazilian-bom night club enter- tainer who had accompanied her on the trip south of the border. Sardelli declined to answer questions about when they might wed. The divorce was granted ear- lier yesterday in Juarez, Mexi- co, by Judge Miguel Guerra on grounds of incompatibility. Of ex-husband Mickey Hargi- tay, Miss Mansfield said: "Mickey is great man. I re- spect him but we just could not get along." She was awarded custodj- of her two children by Hargitay. Dialers on W-E school levy Obituaries Mrs. Mary Tick Funeral services will be held at a.m. Saturday for Mrs. Mary Tich, 535 Dock Kd.. Madison. Mrs. Tich, 70. died yesterday at Cleveland Clinic. Parkinson, 14. of 4777 Corduroy Rd., William Brys, 13, of 7327 Marion Dr., and Kathleen Chorman. 12, of 4855 Marigold Rd., will be on the trip sponsored by the Cleveland Automobile Club. Students will visit the Gettys- burg Battlefield, the Capitol and Supreme Court, Washington Mon- ument, the Smithsonian Institute, the FBI. Mt. Veraon and the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. They will join youngsters from states and the District of Safety Patrol Par- ;ade Mav 11. Thomas is a student at Mentor Shore Junior High. William at- West End Hospital is drawing j tends St. Mary's and KatMeen them particularly from the to Headlands Elementary, i terland area, says James Boyce, j ptL John A. Pollock and (director of Lake County Memoriali-ilrs- J- A. Popp, office manager Hospital in Paicesville and County Automobile End Hospital in Willoughby. wffl ke counselors on the stu j jdents' bus. Lake County pays for emer-j__________ gency care of its indigents under i 'a contract with the hospitals. -i r [insurance salesman Unpaid bills for select group treatment of transients or other outsiders is an "extremely insig-f Gver S1 in sales last .nificanr fraction of bad debts jp31" ,the hospitals are stuck j Boyce says. You can help us help you1 EDITOR'S NOTE: Walter Knapp, acting fire chief of Wickliffe, offers some vacation tips in a letter to his friends, l' the people of Wickliffe. Hi, neighbors, I see it's vacation tkne again. "'I fr-u- f Hi h is nasJit oeeu is in the state law in the insurance basine.s a 32-year-old Wick- salesman fyr i membership in the exclusive Mi! i Irj-ln _ "H> _ __ T I It hasn't been worthwhile (is in the same place when 'come home thig year. You can help us. Check with the gas and electric companies to find out which ap- pliances should be disconnected. Get rid of any oil or paint-'says, soaked rap you may have in was a member of iyour basement or closets. Immaculate Conception Church of your house key witn Mrs Tich lion Dollar Round Table. to i Joseph E. Konina, 30320 R.d-e naer wmchJRd., m the insurance bll_ University Hospitals, Cleveland, j only four years, joins the select seeks to make Maple Heights pay one per cent of all agents treating paupers from that j ted to the national club. city, according to Boyce. j Kopina, father of three anj "But it's a dub he i President of the Wickliffe Rotary I Club, sells in Lake, Cuyahoia, Ashtabula and Geauga counties. Move to overhaul railways The British House of Commons has approved the Conserva- tive government's program for drastic overhaul of the nation- alized railway system to pat it on a paying basis. Final Everest climb starts KATMANDU, Nepal   oed P.M. From tfee Grand Opry Kitty Wells Tfce KfHy "ifh Bills Ptiiilips. Johnny and the Tea- Mountain Soys plus Bash- fa! Brother OrwaW. popular cojnedian. DENISON THEATRE West Side Corner of Wert 25th and Denison WINNER OF 2 Academy Awards DARRYL F. ZANUCK'S The BAY DOORS OPEN 7 P-M. SHOW STARTS FEATURE ONCE ct 8 P.M. RNO SEATS RESERVED Adults........ 1.50 Juniors....... .90 Children.......50 MOVING? If someone you know is moving... A friendly cafl Ijy the Welcome Wagon Hostess Jbelp tfaeia feel at home. Tdl Welcome Wagon, the B2IE8 address of fenruies you know who are moving. IN MENTOR Mrs. RoL-'t Deemer MENTOR HEADLANDS Bl 5-2376 Mrs. Norman W. 7-1869 KfRTlAND KIRTLAND HILLS Marty Weaver 729-7746 EASTLAKE PatCodoey WH WIUOUGH1Y NcoHsy Adons WH 24540 WICKUF7E Karbryn Lyons IV 1-6159 WELCOME WAGON   

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