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Steubenville Herald Star Newspaper Archive: August 18, 1928 - Page 1

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Publication: Steubenville Herald Star

Location: Steubenville, Ohio

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   Steubenville Herald-Star (Newspaper) - August 18, 1928, Steubenville, Ohio                                OtttG WEATHER jfttffy etoodHfflffht. Son* toy ftlf. Not much change IA ttffperatutt. tfi^O BVRtmW NBWSPAPBIt OF EASTERN OHIO liV NEWS. ADVERTISING AMD CIRCULATION. Home F Lint 6 VOl* 81. NO. 11? STEtJBfiNVlLtiE, OHIO, SATtflTOAY, AUGUST 18,19&~8IXTEEN PAGES. Has HiiWj^llCurtis Accepts Party's Call Today SON OF KANSAS TO BE HONORED AT CEREMONIES tr Senator S. D. Fess Formally Notify Candidate to INDIANS ARE THERE Tribes Claim Hoover's Running Mate; Dance at Celebration Senate* Charles Curtis, colorful earji e Republican ticket will be formaflr Senator S. D. Fess at Topeka tod*yV' have something interesting to say,jft reply* !otr vice-president on ,_, of hi* nomination The K.ansah Is-expected TODAY (What Time Is It? Betiting the Moon. Sinkable Life Guards. Spiritual Gt^darnajr5* iM JUhur Bristol^ HUNT IS STILL IN LEAD: BEGG TOPEKA, Kans., Aug. 18 (AP) - The imposing state house, standing in a spacious park of this city in the richly laden farm lands, was the mecca of Republicans today. Here late in the afternoon Senator Charles Curtis, son of Topeka and for a third of a century a public servant of this state, will be formally notified of his nominatin by the Republican party for vice-president. Smiling and jovial, Senator Cur' tis was about the city early greeting some of the incoming.hosts. On I all trains and on all roads they came, party leaders, official members of the notification committee -one from each state-but mostly old friends of the senator. Life Of Service , For 38 years Senator Curtis has represented Kansas in Congress, 1' years In the House and the malnder of the time in the senate where he has ruled for the past three years as the leader of his narty, the majority group. Now he :VfiF**� Thirteen) NEW YORK CITY on Thursday 10.240 Americana spent 5 ts cached ask "What time is " jhe telephone company had fused to answer that question, decided to answer and charge lickel. "The laborer is worthy his hire." rhi* American indifference to Its is a sign of prosperity, also olish laziness in some cases. )ealers in clocks and watches invited to insert in this news er an advertisement to this ef "Buy our   clock-or   watch .J you don't need , to  pay el for the cerrect time,"     � SRT HASSELL and Parker Cramer finished in seven hours he first 800 miles of their Journey rom Illinois to   Sweden,  flying 110 miles an hour. That will eem a snail's pace to future gen rations. /      [EN have already  beaten  the Imoon in Its journey around the rth.  The moon's trip  takes  a tie more than 27 days.   Fliers made the trip in 23 days, .ing the moon  around  the is one  achievement. The will be to TIE the sun in its erent   journey   around   the machines flying 1,000 miles hour, gentlemen wanting a pro T* ��n ���. will be able to W*c�y under the sun, follow (Turn to Page Fourteen) iOSEIMINETO IENCHJLAZE }f Falls, Stops Fire finen at Amsterdam Coal Co. Shaft Sandusky Man Pledges Support to Cooper After Recount Jan Lindy Safe tind Sound, Radio Report Untrue tTVEN if the radio reported toil night that Colonel Charlea A. Lindbergh had crashed and, was killed, it wasn't so. The Herild-Sta-r was deluged with calls from persona ell over the city aaking the newspaper to verify the report thai the "Lone Eagle" had met a mishap. The callers Insisted thai the radio reports had Kim dean. The report*'.were branded on the face of them as untrue. To* day the Associated Press announces that all over the country and as far as Cuba newspaper offices were ashed to verify the rumor which'swept the poutftfy. Of course, it was untrue, Lindbergh is in San FranclsceJ en business and did not evemfly yesterday. . The reports proved, how*V*r, that Lindy is still the blgfest single figure to the neifo^ FORT STEUBEN BRIDGE TRAVEL TODAY New Ohio Rivef Gateway Between East and West Open   ' Flying Danger Route DEDICATION AtJG. 29 Officials of Three Cities, Bridge, Committees Tour Span , LENGTH OF PARLEY SEE FAVORABLE SIGN Three-Day Sessia+ is Expected to Produce Real Solution STILL  IS SECRET ]Mb3ai IS HOPING British Racer  Escapes Death When Machine Catches Fire LOCHER COLUMBUS, 0., Aug. 18.- (AP)-Doubt as to the outcome of their close race between Senator Cyrus Locher, Cloveland and Graham P. Hunt, Cincinnati for the Democratic short term sena torial nomination, will not be disponed before the first of next week. Secretary of State Clarence J. Brown indicated the official count would be available at that time. Hunt Has Margin Although rechecks of tabulations both by the Associated Press and the secretary of state's office on the unofficial returns, showed Hunt ahead in the neck and neck race, it seemed the contest could not definitely be declared settled (Turn to Page Fourteen) Stunt Flier is Saved   iby Ray Keech, Prom Dpftth hv 'flhllTP reached   an   average   speed   of r rum ueain py ^nuit m B5 mileg gn hour ,n Apri, SELFRIDGE FIELD, Mt. Clem-ens, Mich., Aug. 18.-(INS) - Hurled from a plane during a barrel lop, Lieut A. W. Redfield, a reserve pilot of Chicago, lives today to tell the tale because be recovered from the shock of the unexpected tumble in time to use his parachute. Redfield was tossed from the plane at a height of 1,500 feet. The parachute was strapped to his back. BELFAST, Northern Ireland, Aug. 18.-(AP)-Captain Malcolm Campbell's blue Bugatti car burst into flames today on tha second lap of the tourist trophy automobile race which started this morning. Campbell succeeded in jumping out of hit flaming car which was destroyed. The fire started when the petrol tank exploded at the end of the second lap. He was the favorite starter In the race, the betting odds being five to one against him. He set a world speed record of 206.95 miles an hour at Daytona Beach, Fla., on February 19 of this year, the record being broken American,  who COLUMBUS? Aug. ^.-(API-Sessions of awub-committea which tagan* Thursday and Wert coriMfr ued last night, were expected b� Ohio oMirators and Junlo>mini union officials holding a wage conference: h*re.'to be/productive to, day of-a ^solution of somd'of^he As on ThSila^SlSl �o �t*te ment was forthcoming When the sub-committee adjourned last night, but the very fact of its lengthy delibertiona has led some observ er* to believe that an agreement may be reached. Twofc previous conference! held since the international body empowered the state organization to make a separate wage agreement have failed dur-ng the first day's sessions. The principal point of differ* has been failure to agree on a con- The new gateway to Steu-benville and Ohio- from West Virginia and Pennsylvania the Fort Steuben bridge was opened today, At 6 a. m., traffic began moving over the span, the new connecting link between this city and the communities of the two nearest states on the other side of the Ohio. > Ceremonies and inspection Friday afternoon and the opening today precede the dedication and celebration which will mark the formal opening on August 20. Friday afternoon the first auto mobiles and the first commercial truck drove across tho span and over the beautiful new concrete highway that extends from the West Virginia approach to tha west end of Holllday Cove. Seven automobiles, carrying officials of the bridge company, officials of Steubenvllle, Welrton and Holll day's Cove and civic loaders of tha three communities, and the truck raa1W4with" cement of the typ> Srldee Offlclsls Le.dT.rade. At 8 p. m. the first .car movod BRING ACTION FOR PROPERTY AT YORKVILLE Alleged Communistic Groups are Targets of Union Chiefs SEEK  INJUNCTION   i "Save Union" Committee Caused Charter Lapse, Alleged p. m across from the Ohio, ild* their Diana ''6r�ntor Jtookford'' in which thiy w-attsmpttng The encroachments of Com* munism in the ranks of union miners in Eastern Ohio were assailed in a suit filed today by officers of the district and sub-district of the United Mine Workers of America, seeking to deny the,"Save tho Union'7 committee and sym- Eathizers  use  of  miners' uildings and to restore the charter to the local at York." ville. The "Save the Union" committee and tho Ohio-Pennsylvania Miners' Relief committee are named as sponsors ot tha defendants in the suit, several of them being men long prominent In Yorkvllle and the district OOit mining circles, They include Jack Bell, Thomas Bell, William Cunningham, Frank Nunley, A. R. Watklns. George Farr, J. B. Armt-tage, Albert Briges} John Blrksa, Tony Woloshyh, Sam Mliko, Tom, Frearlste and Frank Markowskl, They are former members of local union No. 971 at Yorkvllle, whoso charter */�' recently revoked because of alleged. conn munlstlo      vlUiiK within tha ranks of th*flfot�r.l " �- Tho suit was brought by Lea for Or presldealt HIT MARINE POLICY fAMSTBBDAM. Aug. 19-Prep-stlons were being made today seal up the mine ot the Amsterdam   Coal   company   which lugbt fire last Sunday and which since been spreading to other of the mine.   The decision abandon attempts fo quench fire with chemical* was made It evening after firemen refused enter the mine again aftr one ction of the roof fell la and Pother sections threatened to tall imomtniarlly- The work of sealing the main stry is in charge of Andrew Mul-aod Frank Nebb�, state mine aspectors.   John Lees, who was charge of the work has return-to Cadiz. As much ot the mining equip-"t a* it wa* possible to reach removed from the mine ycarder. All the fire SgbUag ap-Fparalu* v�� sUo removed. The men in charge ot the work stated today that tbey believed that it would be necessary to keep the mine sealed for the usual SO day* and a few veeka would suttee to smother tbe fames. More than ISO wen are affected by the dosing of the wiae, WJLLIAMSTOWN, Mass., Aug. 18-(AP)-~The policy of the United States in Nicaragua today was again assailed by Professor Charles W. Hackett, University of Texas, at a round table session of the institute of politics. Straton Insisting On Rules of Dueling Code GREENWOOD LAKE, N. Y, 1 Aug. 18.- � left as a tip by Henry Ford after a luncheon consisting of one glas* ef hot water and � amU vegetable salad. 18.-(AP)- Fielding Yost wil be head football coach at the University of Michigan this season, the Detroit News say* today. "Although no official announcement has been made" tha paper says, "it i* definitely understood In, the executive offces of the Mchigan athletic as-aodation that the 'old man' will one* more be in active and complete charge of Michigan'* football fortune*." Close Farmers' Bank In Tuscarawas County COLUMBUS, O., Aug. 18.- (AP)-Because of froun a***t* nd bad paper, E. H. Blair, state superintendent of bank*, today closed tha Farmers' State bank of Ft. Washington, Tu*c*r�wa* county, he said. The hank, organized ia 1919, had 126,000 capital stock*. Ra* source* on June 80, last, when the bank reported to the �tate department, were im.t20.Q0. Blair said. Walter Wohlwend is president, and B. E. dimming*, c*�bier. COLUMBUS/ O., Aug. 18. - (AP) ~ Two honor prisoners walked away from the prison farm at Rose ville, in Perry county, last night, officials of the state penitentiary here were notified today. The prisoners are Norman Welsh, 23, and Rose Baste, i3 both of Youngstown. Welsh had been sentenced laat May J 3 to serve one to 10 years for grand larceny and Baste May 29, for one to three years on a charge of failure to provide for a minor child. ItKDS I.HAD 1N\ADKItS. TOKYO, Aug. 18. - (AP) - Japanese press dispatches from Habin, Manchuria, today said that there bad been a serious invasion of tha Kulun Nor district io northwest Manchuria by 8,000 Mongol Burial eavalry aUeged to be led by Red Russlsn officers. COCHRANE, Ont., Aug. 18.--(AP)-The, airplane. Greater Rockford, was poised on the' runway here today ready for a noon takeoff on the second leg of its! flight toward Sweden. Bert Haascll and Parker Cramer, Rockford, III., pilots, received favorable weather reports early today and announced the takeoff at noon so they might arrive at Mt. Evans, Greeland, their next objective, in the daytime. The flight of 1,800 miles is expected to take l(i hours. Weathjtr condition* here were favorable for the takeoff with the runway* rapidly drying out from yesterday'* rain. Hassell and Cramer flew here Thursday from Rockford. a distance of 8(>o miles, but were barred by unfavorable weather from continuing their flight yesterdsy. Runaway Boxcars Hit Auto, Three Unhurt Three person* escaped without Injury at 7:16 p. ra. Friday when tbey Jumped from a machine a few second* before it was struck by a string of Wheeling A Laka Erie cars, Carl Padeu, driver, and two occupants, were about to cross the railroad tracks at Slack (treat when four box ear* broke away and proceeded over tha track* at tha crossing as (bay approached. Without stopping the machine, 1'aden and the passengers leaped from the car to safety, it was truck by tbe railroad ears and was damaged considerably, the slow speed at which the ears were traveling saving it from belna completely wrecked. Foiter Stopped Down, Live* to Rear About It One Killed, Two Hurt Br Escaping Robbers pOSTER PARSONS was Quit*' nervous whon ho awojte In city jail this morning.  There was just cause and ho shdulu have been worse than nervous. Parsons, loaded with "giggle soup," as police hav* lately dubbed "third rail" liquor, was walking along the Steubenvllle. Mingo Boulevard last night. He atepped to his right to discover that he had taken a very large step. He stepped from the boulevard to the Pennsylvania rail* road track* 60 feet below. Po-llee were summoned and after discovering that he waa uninjured took him to city jail. Parsons was a bit abaky when arra'gned In police court this mornln* and Mayor Conley discharged him. of  district lo and,part ot of auMi, John W�lkar. Thorn***. iFfle*. Johi W. Jone*. Richard-. CamiSbeli ahd Robert Bell, *U aub-dlslrict head* and member* of tha district ewjutlve board. Oct Temporary Writ. Thay wera granted a temporary Injunction against the defendant* today using the former union headquarter*  at  Yorkvllle. by Judge J. 8. Paisley,  -.f; The suit Is for injunction to quiet title of Yorkvllle real estate, (Turn to Page Fourteen) XELlOGGSAILS ON PEACE TRIP Nations to Sign Treaty Renouncing War in Paris, August 27 PARRY SOUND.Ont., Aug. II. (AP)-One man was killed and two others injured today hen residents of Waubamlk, near here, attempted to eapture three robbers who had just escaped from a Canadian Pacific train enroute from Uudbury |o Parry Bound after they had looted a mall car. A farmer named Jaokson was killed when he waa shot through tha neck by the bandit*, other* wera Injured. One of the bandlta was captured and 11,500 was found on hlro. Tha other* **eap�d. Engineer Killed as Train Strikes Switch LACROSSE, Wis., Aug. 18.- CAP)-The engineer wa* killed and more than 100 passengers were slightly sb*k*a up tbl* morning when a limited Burlington railroad train, "The Black-hawk," from Minneapolis to Obi- WASHINGTON, AUf, ll.~ (AP)-Secretary Kellogg waa oa the high sea* today, pound for Pari*, where tha multi-lateral treaty, for tha ranunotation of war In tbe formulation of which ha took a leading part, I* to be signed on August 87. Accompanied by Mrs. Kellogg and three state department aides, the cabinet officer called front Nev York late last night on tha French steamship Isle d* France. Among hi* fellow passengers wa* . W. L. Mackenzie Xing, premier of Two I Canada, who will sign the treaty on behalf of his government. "Everything I hava to say,'� Mr. Kellogg (old reporter*, "ha* been aUted. I am delighted to be on my way on (he ocean to con� summate this most Important service of (he nation to peace." switch, ran nearly �0* f*at on a side track, The angina and two mall ear* want through �lx wall* of a machine shop and round-house at (ha Grand eroaiiog bare. Tha dea4 man I* Engineer C. W. Sou!**, ii, Lacrosse, who jumped. Accommodating Trio Hold Up Toledo Stow TOLEDO, O., Avgi J8^-(AP)- Three bandit* held up tha D!a erA   hftf*l   ajrhairSt  *M�W   II WH1TTIEH, Cal-, Aug. II.- (AP)-Some forty years ago a little girl named Lou Henry arrived (a the village of Wbittier oa a stage from Norwalk, Cal, accompanied by ber mother, father and sister. Tb* one (mall hotel in the village wa* crowded *o Friend* took the family into their home until thay could And other ac-commodstlOB*. Yesterday Lou Henry returned to  Wbittier-returned as Mr*. Herbert Hoover, wife ot tb* Republican t>reelde%t|tl nominee and arrived in a large automobile escorted by police motorcycle* wbleb aeraachfd an opeo path for tha ear along the paved streets. Mrs. Hoover came back to receive (he de-(tre* of Doctor of Literature from Whlttler collage which she attended la tbe days wbea ,lt wa* Wbittier academy, � small school sponsored by tbe Friends cburcb. A*4 a* an� �i*pped Jnto tha lobby of tb* large hotel where her friend* of former d*r� ware gathered, tha Irst person* sb* met were a white-haired usn with a c*6*. tod hi* wife. "Why. Mr. sad Mr*. Brtgg*!" exclaimed Mr* Hoover, "I remember you well-you provided tbe first bad I slept o� la Whlttler!" "To tbJok that she remembered u�," beamed the old couple a* Mr*- Hoover moved oo to other old time friend* who �J-�d the room. ear LONDON, ^h^i^-i^hm Oreat fritaJa wa Mas nuoUg t� (iuUb bulWlug la �omp*uUo* With tbe German LJE�}}1, will m, fijr (o A��ric� W* mt, am* maadar O. % 9*>W (#14 lha A* snriatad Free* * *^w*w(rTr   ~~ th* aacajitti tif t�M*d �UW* ha* up} mjiinoatmc? wm �** w   

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