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Steubenville Daily Herald Newspaper Archive: May 18, 1874 - Page 1

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Publication: Steubenville Daily Herald

Location: Steubenville, Ohio

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   Steubenville Daily Herald (Newspaper) - May 18, 1874, Steubenville, Ohio                               i ILLE ALLY HEIUJJ) 'NEWS. UILISIIED, 1300. mid ews. Z T -.V 15 JK T> 1 O. F OK nmo, COUNTY, SS p.i-f-.r- u-i anth .ritv ap- fircl H t U.VN- iiil Joiiv PALMAR, who, beiru Sjv tii'Vrfr-the pu'-.i-iio-s and proprietors of HKRM.D AND NKWS, un.i that, T h.'  'ia -i ul t on Ut- If KS. I.D -.-f> is OH" a-ii thirty-tw> f. -a a '1 an 1 HTIK fi (inula'ioa of tiv K'Kiv A r> New-, is four iio'isaml two i r- an i s v -nty t  p -iation made for State purposes. Is tii. ;v anv special credit due the Legisla- t u o1' 1874 on this pcore? Let us for Fuad in 08 1574. I 17 years until the past winter, and in all probability the expense, paid for by the public, will be sufficient to establish the old custom again. Mea like the Hon. Gentleman of the Portsmouth Times may think that it is an ea-y matter to so pull the wool" over the eyes of the public, but it is a mistake. To intro- duce a buncombe resolution to adjourn when it is very well known that it is virtually impossible, is another way to attempt the same of blindfolding. Unless the gentleman above mentioned and his Democratic friends can put forth better claims than those presented, tbe people will probably withhold their thanks until better de-erved. Under the heading of "What the Ohio Legislature the Portsmouth Times, edited by Hon. James W New- man, State Senator from that District, j-HV-5 The Sixty-First Genera! Assem- bly of Ohio, which adjourned April liOth, did much that should entitle'it to the thanks of the people. v It reduced the taxes for State pur- p nearly one-half million dollar-, j being in exact figures 8470 182. -It cut down appropriations for general pur- neirlvthe same nl (jrUZPtlf, What do the above figures mean an actual cutting down of expenses in the jiitUjairement  ve difference amounts to with- in 8J-> 005.18 of the reduction of taxes, tor which the editor of the Portsmouth claims credit for the Democratic Legislature, And on further examina- tion we find that in 1873 appropriations made in the Revenue Fund, for cliims allowed by military commissions, OC'" all of which is just and proper, but if a special character. Said claims uiMunted to 1C. leaving a ba.1- "ice in Hvor of tlie Legislature of 1873 US. Taking the circumstan- enumerated above into considerati'-n, tnd how could it be otherwise? The urce of expenditure is no le-s than a ago, with the exception of the Asy- nn Fund, as before stated. There has no change in our public iv.) :is many office holders as be'ore. i fact of the is, there >t enough holes for the pins, so more punched Then, as to expenditures our public there aid practiced in any department of Were there leaks in the man- of tlie penitentiary Any pec- rum di-c >vered by jirviii'j- into the 'irs or' the Insane AW any I .-vstiir-itions were m vie reports .list d corse.-t. What i-; the conrlu-ion one would ly arrive at9 It H The reluc- is due to the f ict that no iic at demands outlay. But another cHirn, the to tlii- thanks of tlie people I' to in orii'iu-Jit-. -HIM thus wasted IfsS lim- .-_ the se.--i m dim ir- >r  the v Hh'-udv 11 ctfd Is it to be siip- >-f 1 that this piece of buncombe in- in to the cist of the State is so :i Ot those who read the K-eedhvj-s of the last Legislature, there j !UL who do not that j J more than a qu iniru ever m ire than threa days ia ft irinj: the session. "This is too trans- j to answer rphe know very we'll that uearlv i Mib r of the A--env> y i? compelled to e at 1 orne, as a general thing, once in or lour and it is a time in i which his have an onnor- t> see r.Im., -an i rht-lr v  present <1urin_r the b fcr twaaty t Friday evening. The notice may be found in the second column of the first page of Saturday evening's HERALD AND NEWS. The reporters of the HERALD AND NEWS and Gazette were appointed secre- taries of the meeting. This is not an extraordinary thing at public meetings. At least I know it to have been done be- fore. But you say iu your editorial notice, "we know that these youag knights of the pencil do meet in the Gambrinian halls and discuss their reportorial note book- together over foaming mugs of malt." This circumstance was probably not known at the time the reporters were made secretaries of the temperance meeting. It transpires through the col- umns of your paper, and is not Jikely to enhance the value of the young men in the estimation of their employers, unless a beer saloon is regarded as the proper place to di-cuss the business of their re- spective offices. The information you give in tbe arti- cle wou'd be useful to the city officers in their efforts to break up ail drinking places. Perhaps you could say in whose G.tmbrhiian ball the reporters meet; whose LTlasses they use; whether they drink "the foaming inah" in, on or about the premises. Moreover, don't you think it is somewhat dangerous for a voung man to indulge in intoxicating drink There are some instances of even old men becoming fools aud madmen by reports over beer and whi-ky, and such stuff A man can nlwuvs tell the truth better when be is sober than when ne is drunk In the .vim8 notice you say, "at least one of the Executive Committee also, who as appointed on Friday night, i- a pronounced licen-e man, and averted h" inten- fi in of voting that billot.1' Then the pfM< dent of the meeting made a ridicu- l blunder. But did not appjint an Kvc-irive Corn-nittee at all He apivaiii" 1 Messrs. Bittin. McConville, Al'-Mi. S, ;uil ling ami MeCurdy to select appoint one man in each township in the county and seven in the city to act as a Central U maty Committee, and a their names in the papers. Whom they will select has not trans- pired, but it is probable they -will be anti-license men, for it is not hkelv that Messrs. Battin and GJ. will go aSinu4t their own expressed convictions on thi? i-sue. From moral and politi- cal considerations they all go anti-licence, and doubtless would be glad to h-ive the opportunity of voting prohibition. The meeting was not so silly after all. But the trouble of it is. other papers which are not ia sympathy with us, will g'-eediiy snatch at your e iitocial and transfer it to their and thus v .nr reportea's and oar meeting su8er in their reputation. P.ease to look; at it. STEUBENTILLE, OHIO, MONDAY, MAY 18, 1874. VOL. 27.-SO. BY T TERRIBLE DISASTER, i Bursting of a Keservoir, THREE TOWNS SWEPT AWAY Great Destruction of Life and Property. HAYDESVILLE, MASS, May 16. A large reservoir, about four miles north of this place, burst about eight o'clock this morning, and t.ie water came rush- ing down the hills carrying everything befi-re it, It struck the southeastern portion of Williamsburg village, about two miles north of this place, carrying away a large number of dwellings, thence tn Skionerviile, where it swept away Mr. Skinner's silk mills and his boarding and dwelling houses. Con- tinuing on, it struck the large manufactory of Messrs. Hayden, Gere Co., sweeping it away in an instant. Large stones and machinery were swept through the main streets at a fearful rate, and well built houses were instant- ly crushed, not giving the inmates a moment's warning. The flood then struck the village of Leeds, where a large number of shops, dwellings, were swept away. The Joss of life is very heavy, whole families in some in- stances having been carried away over darns and either killed or drowned. Twenty-three bodies so far have been taken out of the rubbish OB the shore. Whole blocks of tenement houses, filled with women and children, were swept down the stream, and ail the inmates, of course, were lost. At this hour, 12 M, bodies are constantly being brought in and laid in the church. Most of them can be recognized. ANOTHER ACCOUNT. SPKIXGFIELD, May 16. Re-' ports of the disaster in consequence of the breaking of the reservoir at Goshen, Hampshire county, this morning, come in thick and fast. The damage to prop- erty must amount to hundreds of thou- sands of dollars, while it is impossible to estimate tbe loss of life. The Monotuok si'.k Company's worka are damaged to the extent of Con- ductor E. M. Chandler passed over the road early this morning with his train from Williamsburg for New Haven just ahead of the flood that swept away his wife and child. Engineer Roberts, who was to start on the next train, lost his wife and child just below Williams- burg. The flood swept away Skinner's with several women operators A.i. writer says that the of New Orleins are like iigures chi-e'led out of marble, with the soft iLi-h of Guido's brush or of Petrarch's I sou or in tjieir faces, and the ripe Sourh- i blood flush in or to their tern pi us i tinder pure ot j- -A jy tfJ: his wife and three children, and Hayden, Gere Co.'s factory, including; their of- fice and Haydenville Saving bank, with a large amount of funds, and also Loom- i-' Hotel were swept away. At Leeds Mr. Warner's button factory was swept entirely away, the water taking the ca- nal railroad bridge in its course. It stopped at South street bridge. The morning train from New Haven is stopped at East Hampton. The flood is now subsiding. CAUSE OF THE DISASTER. NEW HAVEN-, CONN., May 16. A twenty-four inch pipe in the dam of the great Ashfieid reservoir above Williams- hurg, Mas0., had been leaking for weeks, aud some of tbe people had shaken their heads and said the dam must be attended to or it might break. It did break terday morning. The masonry around the outlet gave way, and then all in a minute, as if a piece had been bitten out of the dam, A GREAT WALL OF WATER seemed to spring up into the air and leap out into the sink below. The standing joke of Mill River Valley, "Look out, the dam is has proved true at last. The torrent was on Wil.iamsburg iu ten minutes and sent its spray above trees sixty feet high, it crunched one liou-e like paper, and killed a woman and her two children. Then another, and another, swept the woolen mills and rushed on at the rate of twenty miles an hour. As it c'xme raging down tbe val- lev, it dug up houses and swallowed them in an instant, leaving no trace. Tree buts aud stones came down the flood. The MOUNTAIN OF WATER, roaring like a thunder storm of hail, reacned Skitmerville and lifted the ailk mills upon its shoulders before shred- ding them into bits. At Haydeuville it swept away the factory in a moment. At Leeds it came down a wall of water, faced by an abatt-'s of timbers, trees and iron boilers, which struck the village in full front. There was an hour and a half of flood, and then an ebb. and at noon those who had escaped came back in crowds to the ruin. Jt is an AWFUL SIGHT. are isvi-ted like crumpled paper, trees stripped  r dealer, wh j had been c ov- rt.-d and had given up the selling of liquor, in c-in.ipli.iac9 with the of the temperance was tiie C KB- roissioners of Excise Saturday, e-Twith selli-ig liq'K-r in li'.s silojnlist Sundav. He pWded guiltv: -taie I that the dav was warm, that a number of needed beer, and it bseo to refuse them. TELEGRAPH SUMMARY. i The Carlists are harrassing the Re- publicans in their entrenchments near Bilboa. The Spanish government haa issued an order calling iato active service forty battalions of reserve. A five thousand dollar fire occured at Whitestone, Ind., Saturday night. Part- ly covered by insurance Special dispatches from Madrid say the new government intends to revise the titles of nobility and to subsidize the clergy. The trotting match for Satur- day at Oakland Park between Eila Lew- is and Dexter was won by Lewis. vTimet 2 A collision is reported on the rail- road at Jlerchyr TydaJ, Wales, between- a coal and passenger train. Forty per- sons were seriously injured. A dwelling and outbuildings owned by Wallace Stephens at Bloouafield, Vt-, were burned Friday, and one woman and two children perished in the flames. A fire on the corner of Everett and Jones streets, Cinciunati, early Saturday morning destryed a carriage "hop and injured a brick dwelling. Total loss about Western, at 11 o'clock, 46 minutes, 16 seconds, Saturday had completed his 381st mile. He is in good condition and appears jovial, but haa become sat- isfied that the accomplishment of his task is impossible. The Western Association" of Journal- ists paid their respects Saturday to the President, who received them cordially, giving to each of the one hundred and fifty ladies and gentlemen in the party a warm shake of the hand. Capt. Morse, who commanded the Arizona, the steamship ou which Goozalea was shot, at San Joee Guate- mala, left by railroad for San Francisco Saturday irght to take" command of the Pacific mail steamship Colorado, ly- ing between California aud China. The proposed conference which was to have been held Saturday at Straits- ville between the miners aud operators, was not held owing to a want of harmo- ny between the parties The operators wanted a mass meeting of miners, oper- ators and citizens at which the whole question of differences could be fully considered. The miners didn't approve of this plan and appointed a committee to represent them. The operators wouldn't accede to this plan and so noth- ing was accomplished and the strike stil continues. At Galveston, in addressing a meeting at the Chamber of Commerce, Col. Van Horn, of Kansas City, said the delegation had two objects in view; one to inquire if Galveston merchants were HAWKINS, PATTERSON CO. proper competition of the traffic of rates from Railroad lines. They would return home satisfied that we could handle their grain and would report to their Board of Trade that the merchants of Galves- ton will do their part. United efforts will be made to induce the Railroads to comply. By this means a trans-Missis- sippi commerce will be built up which will rival that of the East. A Band Arrested. CINCINNATI, May 16. This afternoon a band of Temperance women went out led by Rev. Mrs. S. R. Leavitt, aud stopped in front of a saloon on Bay mil- ler street, within two squares of where the disturbance occurred yesterday. The officers warned them to desist, but they sang and prayed and were arrested. They were taken to the Third street station house, followed by an immense crowd. Among the number were the wives of Rev. Dr. C. H. Taylor, Rev. Dr. C. H. Payne, Rev. Dr. Motfat, Rev. W. J. Lee, Rev. C. R Leavitt and Rev, McHugh. They were releas- ed on parole to appear before the po- lice court next Monday. la the station h use, when Mayor Johnson came, they knelt and prayed and then commenced singing, but were stopped by the officers. After their release they returned to the Seventh Presbyterian Church and held a meeting. A proposition was made to start a Men's Temperance League in every Ward, and to raise a large guar- antee fund of money for the purposes of the temperance movement. For the trial next Monday it was resolved to employ the ablest counsel that can be secured. The police warned the wo- men before starting out that there would be danger if they ventured on Freeman street. The officers say they had information that a band of German women was organized to meet them and drive them from the streets. A mass temperance meeting is appointed to be held at St. Paul's Methodist Church to- morrow afternoon, and meetings are ap- pointed for every night next week. Qrfers were made to bail the women out of the station house, but they all fused ir. re- The Trial ol W.nlerinn If. YANKTON, D. T., May A jury in the Wintermute murder trwi was finally secured this afternoon. The jury regarded by both sides as being com- posed of a much more reliable and in- telligent class of men than could have been reasonably anticipated in a case in which so much interest has been taken. The desire of botn sides seems to have been to obtain fair minded men, and it is somewhat remarkable that out or one hundred and fifteen men examined, but eight have been challenged peremptori- Iv by the defense, and two by the prose- cution. Toe trial proper will commence on Monday morning, and the intention of counsel was announced of making it as speedy as circumstances could per- mit For a Complete Stock of all Kinds of Try Rheumatic Gun, for Rheumatism, for sale at Smith Mor- DRY GOODS, Lace Goods, Parasols, Shawls, Dress Goods, White Goods, Trimmings, Curtains, YOU CAN SAVE MONEY by Going to HAWKINS, PATTERSON CO. 324 Market Street. Particular attention is called to the t Stools of MILLINERY OODS KOTO Being Opened, Comprising the Latest Summer Styles, NOT TO BE FOUND ELSEWHERE. STEWART MCLAUGHLIN. BOOTS, SHOES SLIPPERS AT Prices to suit the Times TEWART M'LAUGHLIN'S, OLD POST-OFFICE BUILDING. SPECIAL-WE Witt ATTACH PATENT BUT- TONS TO SHOES PURCHASED FROM US FREE OF CHARGE. YOU ARE INVITED TO CALL! MILLINERY, vma f THIS WEEK. GOODS ii I- i I', l ill I- U r i. f 4- j, i y HalfHjse ia great variety at the Sui- pender factory, Market street- i 429 Market Street   

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