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Sandusky Star Journal Newspaper Archive: November 2, 1923 - Page 1

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Publication: Sandusky Star Journal

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   Sandusky Star Journal (Newspaper) - November 2, 1923, Sandusky, Ohio                                THE WEATHER * ______ WARMER FRIDAY NIGHT; SATURDAY PROBABLY RAIN. THE STAR SUPREME JOURNAJ GOOD from now until i-tMMWyt.". chances, vote for      M^ffe1 IN ITS "EVECD ____t_ IF1Y-SEVENIH YtAR, 14 PAGES SANDUSKY, OHIO, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 1923, Dally 3 Cents Saturday. 5 Oentg NUMB! SOCIALISTS IN GERMAN CABINET TENDER RESIGN ATI? odo otao odo oao ooo ono ono ono ODO oao u   w _ Separatists Capture Aix La Chappelle City COALITION TO END IN DICTATORSHIP? BAVARIA DEFIANT  I,,. Stresemann Ministry Appears Near Fall as More Problems Pile Up With Mobilization of Bavarian Forces ,      Openly-Food Prices Soar in Berlin. PUT FRANCE Arbuckles Come To Parting Of Ways; Wife Asks Divorce BULLETIN. BERLIN, Nov. 2-The socialist members of the Stresemann cabinet offered the chancellor their resignations today. Their action was in accordance with the demand of the socialist party yesterday that unless the state of siege in the country was lifted and drastic action' taken at once against Bavaria, the socialists would withdraw from the coalition. The   resignations   were   accepted, ~~ (Thursday's dispatches indicated alsolution of the coalition cabinet would be followed by a dictatorship under Stresemann.) BERLIN, Nov. 2-More than 1,000 separatists stormed the city hall in Aix La Chapelle today cutting the water mains and flooding the inner part of the city, dispatches said- The city hall . employes demanded that all bells and whistles in the city be sounded to call the populace to their aid, but they finally succumbed. Separatists carried of the . mayor and some other officials, it was reported. v Dispatches from special correspondents in the Rhlneiand said bodies of separatists from Cobleriz, Duisberg, Crefeld and other towns, were brought in for the attack. They fired on the city hall when firemen and police defended' the building with acid bombs. Separatists dynamited the doorways of the building, it was reported. By CARL D. GROAT, (United Press Staff Correspondent.) BERLIN, Nov. 2-The food situation overshadowed politics in Germany today as .priciys soared to new' heights. Prices trebled over night. Eggs and butter could not be bought in Berlin, today for any money. Merchants either were holding back supplies for higher prices or had been unable to replenish their stocks. The socialist    ministers  in    the  Stresemann  coalition    cabinet    remained absent from its meeting to- regimerit. A further summons will follow." Notices added that factories were expected to allow workers to enlist and to keep their positions open for them while they were serving and try to continue their salaries. With equal � frankness the "Northern Border Guard" issued a proclamation asking owners of old grey army field uniforms, belts, food kits and other equipment to lend them for the use of the organization. Another "self defense" organiza-,   (TuVn to Page 5-No. 1.) Secretary of State Plainly Indicates She Must "Talk Turkey" Or U. S. Quits. By A. L. BRADFORD, (United Press Staff Correspondent.) WASHINGTON, Nov. 2-The United States lias made plain to France that it will withdraw' from the proposed expert investigation of Germany's capacity to pay reparations if the scope of the conference is   restricted in advance by   Premier   Poin-care, it was learned today. A  communication  was  made  to the  French  government by  Secretary of State Hughes through the Fvpnoh   rh:u-gf>_ri'nffnira   nt.   Wash- HOLDING UP FOLK WAS FUN-UNTIL LAW STEPPED IN Miss Ann Osteriin taxicab and a glass; pistol shei said she took part in the crimes simply as a lark. . It was a lot of fun pointing the g^tass weapon at victims, she said. The fun ceased, however, when she was hailed before the judge. When Miss Ann Osteriin was arrested by New York police    on    a day to discuss the demands formu- j charge of aiding her fiance in a se-lated by their  party yesterday.     i rles of holdups with the aid    of a Collapse of the cabinet appeared - -�* � Ttc+rO �= imminent as the bourgeois parties insisted that the socialists demands of lifting the state of siege in the country and taking drastic action against Bavaria, could not be met. It was- said  Stresemann  shared this view. '. Introduction of a stable, gold loan in dollars had completely disorgan-izde the already chaotic financial situation. While merchants must keep their shops open, under terms of the government decrees simultaneously they were only able to demand, legally that buyers pay "official rates" which are in paper marks. This meant the merchants Income from sale of goods was not sufficient to replace stocks. ington M. Andre De LaBoulaye,' it was understood. The French charge conferred with Hughes a day or so ago, it Is learned, and Informed this government of Premier. Poincare's attitude regarding the powers of the reparations commission to the general effect that the conference of experts cannot go into the question of changing the present total of the German  indemnity. Hughes Immediately replied with a complete statement of the attitude of the American government, it is understood pointing out that ho regards such attempts by France to limit the scope of the conference in advance as most serious, t. These facts constitute the explanation of the sudden change' from confident optimism to extreme pessimism late yesterday on the part of high officials here regarding the proposed  reparations   conference. The statement to France by Hughes is interpreted as a request for a complete re-affirmation of the attitude of the French government on the conference in other wor|\ that Hughes has called for a showdown. Premier Poincare is expected to reply soon. The fate of the proposed parley is regarded in informed quarters here as hanging by a thread. There is not the slightest doult in Washington that Hughes will withdraw the Ame'rican government from this final attempt to bring about a settlement of the reparations question if Poincare continues to insist on his restrictions on the conference. In this case It also is believed that Hughes woulcf- make a complete statement to the American people of the failure of this latest move to settle the European crisis and would place the blame for this failure where it belongs. TEXAS WHIPS 2 ATTORNEYS DELAY VOTE ON WALTON DEMURRERS aft K. K. K. Denies Connection Test Shows Sentiment in Okfahoma Senate AgaW Governor and That Impeachment Will Be S&stained Next Week At Final Vote. With Latest Outrage in Outskirts of Dallas. PROVIDENCE, R. I., Nov. 2- Suit for divorce, charging neglect and desertion has been filed in superior court here by Mrs. Minta Durfee Arbuckle against her husband, Roscoe   ("Fatty") Arbuckle, former movie actor, it was learned today. Francis J. Dougherty, counsel for Mrs. Arbuckle, denied the notoriety gained by Arbuckle following the death of Virginia Rappe was 1 reason for the action. the lI Never Had a Happy Day With Stokes"Says Wife. Cross Examined mm rights IE will not Demand Explanation. BERIilN, Nov. 2-Minister of the Interior Sollman today demanded that the Bavaria government explain what it meant by allowing concentration of illegal military organizations along the border of its neighbor state, Thurin-gla. A war spirit, recalling 1914 was reported spreading throughout northern Bavaria where the Hittler bands of "fascisti" are mobilized- Mobilization orders were reported to have been published openly in the papers at Coburg telling the [ "Young German storm, regiment" that the Bavarian government "has summoned  a portion   of the BY READING THE WANT ADS You may pick out many choice articles, suitable as gifts, for the fall bride, or better still- a Christmas gift. What would be more suitable for such occasions than a hand painted gift, such as ti dish or a plate or a set of such articles. This is the gift season, and appropriate articles are .always appreciated. Look over the, classified columns, and you will) find many such rare articles. -They will answer that old problems" What. Shall I Give." SPECIAL - Hand painted 11-ineh meat  plate  or cake  dish   $3.00. ' Brown Art Studio, 910'Hancock-st. Mrs. Brown cannot praise the Star-Journal's want ads too high-! ly for the good work they are do-log- Mr her. They never cease to tell-the public what you have. Let them be of service to you. rTh*PaiH* With the Want Ads Germany , Can Only  Pay Reparations If Held Together, Belief.  (Copyright 1923 by United Press.) PARIS, Nov. 2-France faces the threatening dissolution   of Germany with conflicting emotions. Although it would leave   her more powerful than at any time since Napoleon and would end thQ bugaboo of fear of   Germany's "war of revenge" the price is too great. This is the gist of the opinion of Premier Poincare and French ^gov-eminent circles as outlined in official statements.   It is realized that Germany's break up would end once for all the hope of extracting reparations from  Germany.   The    component states  would each be too weak economically and financially to contribute to  reparations even  if subjected to / force, it is believed. And the one thing France needs and must have soon is reparations payments in cash or kind. She has advanced eighty billions of francs to her people In the war stricken regions to repair the devastation while awaiting payments from Germany. This huge sum is set aside in a special budget charged' to Germany. If nothing is forthcoming from Germany France will be con^ fronted by a great financial crisis- and possibly bankruptcy. At present interest charges on money borrowed to advance upon Germany's account is reaching large proportions. A financial authority estimated that within . twenty-five years the interest. vAjufd-jegual tho entire amount of the/present run-i       (Turn, tq JPwc* b-No, 24 NEW YORK, Nov. %-"I never had a happy day With W. E. D. Stokes ill my life after I married him, Mrs. Helen Elwood Stokes said today when she resumed the stand in the trial her aged husband lias brought for divorce. "I regretted my marriage to Stokes almost as soon as the ceremony was over," she said. Mrs. Stokes' statement were made while she was under cross examination by Max D. Steuer, chief   of Stokes' counsel. For more than three hours until DALLAS, Texas, Nov. 2- Members of unmasked band at midnight removed Joe West-brook, 23, and Loren Johnson, 23, from their room here and took them to the Trinity river bottoms where Wcstbrook was severely flogged. It was the first whipping in Dallas in a year. Wcstbrook, his body covered with bruises staggered into his home at dawn. Denial was issued by high offi-clals of the Ku rilux Klan tolday that any members of that organiza tion participated in the kidnaping of "Westbrook and ' Johnson from their rooming house here last night. Johnson who returned early today to the rooming house, said he had merely been warned not to associate with Westbrook. Wostbrook's. back was a mass of welts and he was suffering severe-j ly.   He said his kidnapers accused him of failure to support his wife and child with whom he is not living, and with beating another woman. He denied both accusations^ He told police two   of the   whlppers were waiting at the home of Mrs. Pauline Fox, where he rooms with Johnson,    when    they     returned home.    Without a word he   said; they  were  seized,  blindfolded  and placed In an automobile whore there were at least four other men. The automobile sped away to the river bottoms just west of the city Recounting his, story Westbrook said: "They, stripped me of my clothing and handcuffed my arms around a' large tree.   They struck me with a heavy leather strap many times. They choked me when I screamed with pain. "I think they took turns beating said. "When they s so weak I could not walk for several minutes." Westbrook was unbound from the tree and ordered not to move By S. A. BARKER. (United Press Start Correspondent.) OKLAHOMA    CITY,    Okla., Nov. 2-Attorneys for Gov. J. C. Walton today began a second day of legal jockeying in an effort to block or prevent a vote on the   executive's   impeachment in the state senate. When the senators meeting as a LT. GOV. TRAPP TO"TAKE WALTON JOi .the lunch recess was called the j cross, examination consisted "of a battle of wits between Max Steuer, one of New York's shrewdest trial lawyers and Mrs. Stokes in which she more than held her own. I  ~""�hT.T'iV suave fire, Mrs. Stokes sat in   the I finAnv auit I wn witness chair, toying with a beaded    lnaJ,> qi,lt 1 wn bag in her laip and tapping together the toes of her tiny gray suede shoes. She smiled and gave slow, calculat-,\" mi"iwo oVloiiV.Vr'i." �T� ing answer to all the attempts of }J� wn^fclrt ? ? ts^ �1 ?�.k h* l*Ul Steuer to get her entangled in a mass p,,7"'?nedfntwcl? ^'0cks ^ro^gh a of dates extending over a period of j ?�Traln t0 a car line and returned tventv vears 1   omc- SteuerVire was arounscd by her LKT^'a hTV11d no* know refusal to give more than an "I am   "J** h2'iIJe"c* to J0""3,0"- He, de-�       - �- ... ' clared he could    identify at least ..........LM court of impeachment reassMps at 10 a. m. they began consider of demurrers filed by the gov *' legal staff against six of the; two charges faced by the ext Walton supporters had little; that tho maneuvers would the attitude of the senate,' shown in the preliminary ,vol Aggressive moves designed to| the case of the governor Who   m moval is sought after a atornfcfe^ ministration of nine montak^r* defeated with only one orHw&i porting votes. ~ ^r. The governor personally, i a3 confident a8 oyer anttf his determination to .�t fight until the finish. The opinion oCftliT meeting today ...wa*�ta�t^M liminaries should   b*^f|snl with as quickly as pfeipNe' actual trial started.; Some hoi have the vote- on one ofth� cli by night.   Upholding^oTWOrT' of the many accusations s?i Walton will be sufficient ,iorT�i Prosecutors under, the leaden of W. E. Disney, expressed tc selves as desiring1 to,^glve sth#|8 tense sufficient time to answer^! 'charges, so that there would haf basis for .the claim that tbe Kofi nor was being "railroaded" -aa'jr 'result the sehate\after acting-demurrers, 'may; adjourn jo,;" week-end and meet Tuesday^ nesday to' start 'the actnafcor tion of evidence. -  Attorneys foe WaJtQtL/in that the leading  cbargea--solved, contended  .the^pros^! (Turn To Page 6-Ndi note ' ciui.te certain" or a "to the two of the men and expressed the best of my recollection," in answer , i,0ji0f that there was a second au to his questions for positive   dates j tomobile carrying at least six more tlurinnr the period when she     was ' alleged to have her friendly relations with Wallace. men. Steuer tried to tangle her up when > ng> If* C*locin v testimony showed   slight   dis- ; ITinCt? Mil tJllKOlU Is Berlin Report Lucky Stumble Saved Life of Policeman in Cleveland Gun Duel. her testimony crepancies- with that given   at   the previous trial but she remained an-fTuffled and replied on   one   occasion: "Mr. Steuer, I shall not be influenced by my previous testimony or by the testimony of any other witnesses. I .shall testify only to the best of my recollection Pending outcome of impreachment, charges against Governor J. C. Wal- j ton, Lieutenant Governor     Martin! Edward Trapp is piloting the ship of state for Oklahoma. And if Wal-.ton is dismissed Trapp will succeed him. Mm car is To Be Used for U. S. Government and Private Commercial Interests. AKRON, Nov. 2-Although the German Zeppelin patent rights have been bought by the Goodyear Tire and Rubber Co., it has not been definitely determined whether the giant dirigibles will be manufactured at Winfoot Lake aviation field, Akron, officials of the company . said today. \ "We had not intended to release the news of the deal with. the German interests until next week when complete details would be worked out," said P. W. Litchfield, general manager and vice-president of the company. He explained that he was going to confer with other officials of the company and would probably make a more definite announcement later in the day. Goodyear officials will lay details of the plans before the United States government in the near future. Litchfield .pointed out that It would be unwise to make public these plans until authorities at Washington had approved them. (Turn  To  Page  B-No.  6.) Injured Man Cut Throat; May Die TOLEDO, O. Nov. 2-Discovered by passers-by in a subway early today, suffering from a broken leg, a man who gave hjs name as Pete Gilhooley, 36, calmly slashed his throat with a- razor in a sudden fit of despondency. before . witnesses could move to stop him. Gilhooley was removed to St Vincent's hospital where his condition is regarded as critical. Gilhooley told pedestrians who found him lying in tho subway that he had been thrown from a New York Ceutral train by two men-v CLEVELAND, Nov. 2.- One member of a gang of three gunmen was believed wounded : today in a battle with Policeman Andy Scdiack. The fight oc-cured at a street restaurant. Sedlak had a narrow escape from death t\v,"ce, once when the gunmen pressed revolvers to his temple and drove him from the restaurant. A second time when he was in clear range of their guns only a lucky stumble saved his life. Sedlak was returning to the police station with a stolen car he had recovered on his beat. He saw an automobile drawn up in front of the restaurant and three youths get out. Becoming suspicious he followed the youths Into the res- i taurant. Sedlak stepped behind them ' and started feeling in the pockets ' of the youth in the center. The two I other gangsters leaped to their feet j and drawing    guns    placed   them against the patrolman's temple. The  gunmen  emerged from  the restaurant, Sedlak    following    and : opening  fire.  The  gangsters  guns ! barked back. j The gangsters turned after the volley and rah  for  their automobile 1 Sedlak continued firing from     the (Turn to Page 6-No. 4.) Asked why she had not � made some'attempts to learn the identity of the woman who so closely re-pemiiled hqr and who witnesses have ! members testified positively had   been    "    ' ------ qucntly in Wallace's apartment, she replied: "I am the one being tried and not she." BERLIN,     Nov. 1.-The former j i crown prince  of Germany has ar- j I rived at his castle in Oels, Silesia, t the Deutsche Zeitung said today. The By Bonus, Tariff Re#f Downward, Ford and v Reduction Freight Rates CitecD WASHINOTONVNovi >fc actment of a bonus bin,! ance of Heiwy Forifs> Shoals offer, downward uf the tariff ami leutscne zeitung saia iouiiy. xnu ; , ftf r based its information on "prl- j BECk-Fire BelieVed CaUSe OT j Blaze; Insurance Covers Loss. paper vate news The United Press was informed by of the castle staff, how-fre- j ever, that the prince was not in Oels. There was no confirmation of the Deutsche ^eitung's report in other quarters. HANGMAN O.UIT JOB SAN QUENTIN PENITENTIARY, Calif., Nov. 2-Jack Kramer, hangman at San Quen-tin prison, quit his"$ob after ten years today because he said he could see in his dreams the men he had hanged. "I got afraid," he said,'"and I will never spring a trap again.' "Each night the 75 men I have hanged would parade before me in ghostly array." $25,000Secured By Bank Bandits OTTAWA. Kansas, Nov. 2 - j Four bandits held up the First Na- j tional bank here today and escaped ; with $25,000 in cash. j The  robbers  compelled  ten  em- '' ployes of the bank to lie on  the floor while they scooped up all the j silver and currency in sight. both taxes and frdchft rpfiii among the tasks set f�r;jti|| congress by Senator Arthur per, republican of .Kaa�B�;  A Reo sedan belonging   to   the county and used by oounty commissioners  in  inspection    work    was badly damaged by fire   five miles j south of Vermilion Thursday while ,-_ the commissioners were inspecting tlve Magna Charta for tne ill roads. The fire was confined to the hood and dash board of the machine and probably was caused by a short circuit in the wiring. The paint of tho car is badly blistered and tho wiring ruined. Outside of that the injury has not been determined. The car was towed to the Ogontz garage. Tho loss is covered by insurance. I ing session I    "We must, Capper writes^ Our Flag, Its Display to Faithful Dog Goes To Jail With Master Convicted of Driving In An Intoxicated Condition Here Reduce freigbjfrates, par, on farm products. "Give every encouragemt operative marketing. ^ \  "Further revise the. ward on necessities/the. i buy. : V.: "Enact the truth !n.lfa| ' 'Make further reduct proprlations. x 1 � "Draft a new.progrAjn.af * in public expenditure*.,,, ? "Assist in developing ropean market.". ;    v'^; I News Highlights] v. SANDUSKY AND VICINITY Faithful dog accompanies master to jail here, '. - County commissioner's auto damaged by fire, near Vermilion. Congregational.. church pastors confer  here, an ..- ?'Every Member" canvass for Dec. ,9. >  CiENliRAL. NEWS German socialists quit Stresemann cabinet. Walton's attorneys delay vote on impeachment. Hughes tells France plainly how far U. S. will go if conference interfered with. Are you sure you know how display the American flag? I You'll want to know the exact j facts before Armistice Day and it; is important to note that one very j decided change has been made in ; the rules. | A complete story on how to dis-, play and respect the flag, fully il-1 lustruted, will be published in Sat- [ �urday's Big Star-Journal. You'll i want to preserve it for reference,   j --. i A Sandusky couple, married 58 j years, recall early days In the city. Thcn-there's the story of another 1 couple, married 50 years. j A picture of the Ladles Aid Society of Emmanuel church. Of course, there will be a' complete sport feature and news page, the usual page of comics, colored comic supplement. Magazine page, auto news, Radio news and fea-, tures, Fraternal news, Theater ami Movie news and features, the Mblly Lee article, and many others. Almost everybody hi Sandusky and vicinity reads the Star-Journ- The devotion of a dog to his master was demonstrated Friday morning when Burt Kief-fer,   Fremont    junk    dealer, pleaded guilty to a charge, of operating his automobile truck while intoxicated and was fitted $100 and   costs in   municipal court.   Kieffer was committed to the city prison in default of fundiPand his faithful dog now occupies the same cell as bis master, the devoted canine refusing absolutely to leave Kieffer. Kieffer was arrested Thursday evening by police after his truck collided with a Nash touring car driven by Rolland Ritzenthaler of Huron on the Cleveland-Sandusky-rd. Other occupants of the Rita-enthaler car were his brother, Harry Ritzenthaler, C. G. Hardy and Frank Burdue, ail of Huron. Thorn as Howell was riding with Kieffer, Ritzenthaler told police that he saw the truck- approaching on the al. Be sure to get your copy. It j road and noticed that it was away you   want   extra   copies,   or4�r | ing from _ono side of the road early. to 1 another. He said that aa the, cars ?' approached one another he turned out in the road to avoid a collision and that Kieffer i'an his truck di-roctly into the Ritzenthaler machine damaging it considerably. Ritzenthaler appeared in court Friday and tiled the charge against Kieffer while police charged Howell with drunkenness. None of  the Huron men or Kieffer were injured, but Howell' was out about tfre face and head and was given medical attention by Dr. H. N. Sarchet. Howell appeared in court Friday with his face bandaged and pleaded   guilty to   the charge.  He was fined $5 and costs, and it was suspended on his Rroin-lse to return to tne Soldiers' Home which he did.   Howell has been on furlough and was visiting at Fre-mout.   In addition to the fine and costs imposed on Kieffer, his rlghl tp operate his automobile until Jan; uary 1, was revoked.' ^-4 When Kieffer was taken from his cell for arraignment   in court Friday morning, his large .yeHJ>�t dog. accompanied him to the, court room and tOX beside Wnv during mm court procedure. I^aterISs^S&r to a cell with his cated that ,hV tytgj Handling of Ci#s/ erans Bureau ;|h? "Loose" in WASHINGTON* high hand of the United;, ling cla Presli" " Bey made^l of a 'hj " feu mflmmw �fit 75   

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