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Sandusky Star Journal Newspaper Archive: September 6, 1923 - Page 1

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Publication: Sandusky Star Journal

Location: Sandusky, Ohio

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   Sandusky Star Journal (Newspaper) - September 6, 1923, Sandusky, Ohio                                THE WEATHER SHOWERS THURSDAY AND FRIDAY. LEAGUE w�w ODC ODO Over Tokio ires After Three SOLDIERS BURNING DEAD VICTIMS TO PREVENT DISEA American and Other Ambassadors Give Aid To Foreigners-Imperial University and Great Library Destroyed-Stories of Horrors Almost Unbelievable Are Told. (By Staff Correspondent of United 'Press and Osaka Manichi) (Copyright, 1923, United Press) TOKIO, Sept. 5 (by courier Sep. tcmber 6)-A merciful rain lias fallen upon Tokio. Like an angry beast, resisting efforts to drive it from a bloody feast of human bodies and habitations the great fire which has swept the city for three days and three nights, hissing, enveloping the wreckage 4n clouds ot steam, lias imaiiy  aiea uuwn. This enables work of rescue to proceed in more orderly fashion and scoreg of the injured are being brought into relief stations. Wild, weird and fantastic aro the scenes as the people of the city endeavor to adjust themselves to conditions of disaster. Slender youths walking through tho streets carrying big Japanese swords, are aiding the police and REDUCED TOLL OF DjjADJR CITIES Between 30,000 and 40,000 Victims in Tokio and Yokohama New Estimate. By MOTO TAKATA, (Assistant Foreign Editor Osaka Mainichi.) (Written for the United Tress.) OSAKA, Sept. 6-Tho total of dead in Tokio and Yokohama a9 a result of Saturday's earthquake is officially estimated at between thirty and forty thousand. The number   of   houses   destroyed is estimated at 250,000. Most of these were burned in the numerous fires that broke   out after the first quakes. One of the most serious individual instances of    property destruction was the burning of the Imperial university, which contained half a million invaluable books. Tales of terror that gripped Tokio and Yokohama as flames followed the first devastation wrought by Sat-. urday's quakes, came to Osaka today over the highways choked with an endless stream of refugees. Thousands of Japanese seemed to die simply of heart failure, one survivor to arrive here declared. The fiery furnace into which tho capital's buslrress-sectlon-was-changed-in-a few moments by the heaving shocks was so terrifying a sight that many inhabitants merely day down where they iver'e and died. Stories of individual heroism also were added to the first estimates of (Turn To Page 6-No. 4.) military in maintaining order and assisting in the search for bodies. The stench of corpses is becoming almost unbearable. Dead litter the streets in some sections. Among the ruins of burned houses are haif incinerated bodies,. Soldiers have taken over the ta.sk of endeavoring to save the city from the consequences that might naturally follow such conditions. Burials are impossible and the soldiers are bending their efforts toward hastening cremations American Ambassador Woods and other foreign representatives and their staffs whose embassies or legations were destroyed or damaged are being furnished temporary offices in the British embassy. Your correspondent, co-operating with the war office, has just completed a three-days' investigation and check of events. The record shows there were 612 separate shocks felt in Tokio from noon Saturday to six a. m. on Monday. This investigation further showed that 250,000 houses in Tokio were destroyed. Most of the houses were destroyed by fire which followed the quake rather than by the quake proper. The Imperial university, containing a library of half a million books of incalculable value, was burned. The British embassy was    only | sliBhtly damaged. The most dramatic Installation of.a 'Japanese premier In the .country's | history, took place on the lawn In front of Akasaka palace while the fire was at its height and the earth was still trembling with the recurrent shocks Premier Yamamoto stood on the lawn with his cabinet around him for the ceremonies. The prince regent was present. The party did not dare go inside the palace, owing to the danger of its collapse, or being fired. But with the city in (Turn To Page 6-No. 3.) 'QUAKE Bulletins NEW YORK, Sept. 6-The establishments of the Episcopal church in Tokio were wiped out, a cablegram received by Dr. John W. Wood, of the department of missions from Bishop McKin, of Tokio, said today. All missionaries, however, are safe. The property destroyed includes: St. Lukes hospital, two schools, the cathedral seven churches in Various parts of the city and fifteen other residences. LONDON', Sept. 6.-Damage caused by earthquake shock* and fire in the business and official districts of Tokio is smaller than at first reported, according to 400 British refugees reaching Kobe, whose stories were cabled here by the British consul. The foreign office, the admiralty ami the department of justice buildings all are intact according to tho British version. League Ponders Over Corfu Coup LONDON, Sept. 6.-Refugees reaching Kobe are optimistic as to the fate of foreigners in the earthquake ravaged regions of Japan, according to a cable from tho British consul received today. It is believed the British embassy and iconsulate at Tokio and Yokohama may have escaped destruction. NASHVILLE, Tenn., Sept. 6 -A cablegram received here today by L. C. Willis, treasurer of the Church Mission board announced that all missionaries of the Southern Presbyterian church in the 'quake area of Japan were safe. WIFE SAFE, SAKS E EE HOTELS ON BLUFFJEMYED American Correspondent Saw Them Hurled Over Cliff in 'Quake. PEKING, Sept. 6-Three hotels in the Bluff residence district of Yokohama were hurled over a cliff by the first tremendous shock there and their occupants dashed to death, according to an eye witness, of what was perhaps the most terrible single incident of tho quake. Only a few pitifully injured survivors crawled from the ruins, the eyewitness, Roderick Matheson, correspondent of the Chicago Tribune, said, on arrival at Kobe. A majority of, the residents of the Bluff district perished. The Oriental Palace hotel was almost swallowed up by lUc quake. It disappeared into a great rent that opened suddenly in the heaving earth until only the top story and a half remained above the ground." That caught fire. Casualties h ing as well as this, in numbers, from now on you had better look a lit'le more carefully and select letters more condensed. If you are doing better than thia, keep it to yourself and try to 10 BE RAISED BY iY. shot would have been ! soaked, fatal. For this reason the suicide ' ^ Several thousand others changed theory is discounted for it Is claimed ; their minds and didn't go to the that it would have been Impossible . fair. for the man to have fired the second j Grounds were deep In mud, and shot. No trace of any gun could be j the races for the day were called found by officials. It is believed i off. The first heat of the race that the man was murdered by com- was finished in the rain, but it would panlons following an argument. not count, it was announced. Rac-Tho bod}/ ia in the morgue here, ing will start at 12:30 on Friday awaiting more certain identification, j and as many events will be finished us possible. -Fair board members say they are "all out of luck." If it had rained one on?-hundredth of an inch more before 2 o'clock the board would have collected insurance. The policy providts that at least two-tenths of an inch of rain must fall between 10 and 2 o'clock to permit the board to collect. The downfall was .79 of an inch, according to Forecaster C. C. Cooper of the weather bureau. The insurance is for $2,500. Fair visitors this year have noted that the fruit, machinery and auto exhibits are unusually fine, and Floral hall offers many attractions. The poultry display ia very good and is claiming much attention. In the department which in earlier years was the most important of the fair-livestock-there is little to be seen this year. The arrival of twenty head of cattle from the Elyrla fair, Wednesday night, helped out some, bringing the total to 27 head. But fivo horses were being shown, three draft horses entered by Andrew Lortcher of Kimball and two Belgian mares by J. Clayton, Monroeville; There were but two head of sheep and practically no swine. The number of race horses was small. "The only thing we can say Is (Turn To Page 0-No. 5.) By HENRI* WOOD (United Press Staff Correspondent.) GENEVA Sept. 6-The league of Nations. council avoided a break with Italy late today. After deciding at a private session to re-affirm the councH"s competence to adjust the Greco-Italian dispute the only action the council took at a public meeting later was to recommend that the council of ambassadors at Paris find a basis for settlement of Italy's demand for reparations for the death of her commissioners at Janina. The league council despite pressure by a majority of members and of delegates to the assembly which had adjourned pending action by the smaller body did not enter into the question of whether Italy's oc? cupatioii of Corfu was a violation of the celebrated article ten. Answering   Mussolini's   challenge of incompetency the council stall reserved for the league the right to act in this matter but took no action. As the council met today to formulate its fateful decision,   telegrams from all parts of the world ware coming in demanding that the league {"stand pat," mediate in the dispute and refuse to give way to Italy. The assembly of the league was to have held a session this morning but adjourned to clear the decks for the council and to prevent assembly delegates from discussing the Italo-Greek dispute before tho council reached its decision. Tho problem which the council faced and upon which the fate of the league and peace in Europe hangs, is briefly this: Five Italian commissioners were slain at Janina and Italy, holding Greece responsible, occupied Greek territory and demanded' indemnity. Greece proposed an international investigation of the assassinations and protested to the League of Nations ngainst the punitive measures instituted by Italy. The latter questioned the league's authority in the matter and threatened to withdraw from tiie organization if the suhjeet were discussed. Italy held that the council of ambassadors at Paris was the only body competent to adjudicate the matter. . So much more was involved, however, than a dispute between Italy and Greece that gravest consequences may result from the coun-; ell's decision. Although only private conversations between league delegates followed adjournment of the assembly, it is generally conceded that Investigation of the massacre of the Italian mission is a question within tho competence of the council of ambassadors. Thus far, Italy la right, it is held.   Greece has agreed to this. But it is insisted that the Italian occupation of Corfu is an entirely different matter, a question quite within the compentence of the league, opening up just the sort .ot difficulties the league was designed to solve. do still better for it would be a shame to miss Premium One by a few letters. They Don't Care Some participants say they are getting so much fun and diversion out of Filling The Bowls With Letters that whtle a premium would bo most acceptable, even if they did not get any, they would have enjoyed trying to get the greatest number of letters in the bowls. With 15C Premiums to be given away it would seem that there can be none who wil' not ! (lOV receive something fos- their   efforts. | Even the least' of the premium:*, $5 would be good pay for    the    small (Turn To Page 6-No. 1.)        | 7 Government Bending Every Effort To Get Relief To Stricken Japan. WASHINGTON, Sept.   "**.� A meeting of volunteer Garibaldi ans, who fought Tor Greece against (Turn To Page 6-No. 8.)       B 's (--- News Highlights COLUMBUS, Sept. G-Twenty-two European corn borer lines are in operation in northern Ohio including Erieco, according to a report made to Director of Agriculture Charles V. Tvuax by Earls G. Brewer, field superintendent of the quarantine in Ohio. More than 317,000 vehicles have been stopped by the representatives of Brewer's department to determine whether they are carrying corn from tho infested area. These inspectors have clieeteU some 3,000 dozen ears of corn from these machines. A small percentage of the machines encountered refuse to stop when requested to do by the inspectors. A few have been apprehended through the assistance of the  local  speed  officials. "Any insect that threatens the food supply of the state also imperils the welfare of every citizen of the state and efforts to exterminate the evil should have the hearty cooperation of everyone," said Truax. ITS WITHIN AN HOUR Bay Bridge Workers Rushed To Hospital Here  i"J an hour caused the Chas.Ji Andrajj^ Sons ambulance to make two nmaty' to Bay Bridge to remove the* vl' tuns to Providence hospital Thut day morning. The first accident was wh�a^tMj arm of a workman employed by t]!j McDonald Construction Co. engage in the erection of a large warehoi; for the Sandusky Cement Co.--1 caught in the clutch of a holstf] machine.      .     . '� The ambulanoe had Just tfi% to Sandusky with the injured)-, when a call came to return tp� Bridge.   Tho second accident' to a worker employed by the fountain Iron & 8te*l Co. 'Ha| unloading stee] from a car andiS caught between a steel tro*�r( car   One leg was crushed. �, Roy Scott 23 of Ironton Ws first accident victim and suff broken arm and collar bona;: condition was reported �� tto serious at Providence hospife Dav'd  Stokes of Columhttfg mors severely injured *!��.:* crushed and it was. fear hospital that amputettott/lj necessary, ...   . .y-.-.^u^m r f / 84   

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