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Sandusky Star Journal: Monday, November 13, 1911 - Page 1

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   Sandusky Star Journal, The (Newspaper) - November 13, 1911, Sandusky, Ohio                               THE HOME PAPER r TODAY'S NEWS TODAT THE SANDUSKY STAR-JOURNAL FORTY-FIFTH YEAR, SANDUSKY, OHIO, MONDAY NOVEMBER 13, 1911. LAST EDITION NUMBER 29 Imperial Leader. Who Caused Massacre at Nankin Will Be Hunted Down. RUSSIAN COSSACKS TO GUARD CZAR'S PEOPLE Residents of Pekin Are Fleeing and Occupation of City is Expected Soon, SHANGHAI, Nov. rebels today took possession of Chee Foo. Supplies reached them at Nankin and they have returned to attack the city. A re- ward of has been offered by the rebels for the head of General Chang, imperial leader, responsible for the massacres last week. Much uneasiness is felt in high revolutionary circles over news that Russia is sending cossacks to Pekin in anticipation of a disintegration of China. The revolutionists have been afraid from the first of a foreign at- tempt to take advantage of the con- fusion the em- pire for a series of territorial grabs. The result of this alarm is the steady growth of an anti-foreign sentiment which promises to culminate in a vi- olent outbreak in the event of inter- vention. Cossacks Go To Pekin YLADIVOSTOCK, Nov. hundred cossacks who entrained here for Pekin are said today to be an advance guard troops ,the Russian government in- WILL GET A CROWD TOUNGSTOWN, 0., Nov. Holding services in moving picture places at noon on Sundays, is the new plan of church work which is suggested by Dr. S. R. Frazier, formerly pastor of the Tabernacle U. P. church of this city. The plan, he says, would not in- terfeie with the work ot the vari- ous churches of the city but would supplement them. He proposes to have music and short talks on ad- vance religious thought made. 10 BE III Subpoenaes Are Issued For Railroad Men to Show Workings of Trust. TEN INDIVIDUALS INDICTED tends to send to Pekin to czar's interests in China. guard the Fleeing From Capital. PEKIN, Nov. imperialist forces began a vigorous bombard- ment of Hanyang Sunday and at a late hour reports state that the city IF afire and the inhabitants are in a Securing of Jury Is Expected to Take Several Weeks and Big Venire Drawn, CHICAGO, Nov. work of preparation for the trial of the gov- ernment suit under the Sherman law against the beef packers was begun here The case comes to trial on Nov. 20. Subpoenaes have been issued for 13 railroad men oy whom the government expects to show the interstate character of the alleged trust. Ten Chicago packers, heads of the packing industry, will be placed on trial charged with monopolizing and restraining interstate trade in fresh meats. The passible penaltj-, if they be found guilty, is a fine of or one jear in the county jail, or both. The defendants are: Louis F. Swift, president of Swift Co., and director of the National Packing Co.; Edward F. Swift, vice president of Swift Co., and director of the National Packing Co.; Chailes H. Swift, direct- or of Swift Co Edward Tilden, president of the National Packing Co.; J. Ogden Armour, president of Armour Co Arthur Meeker, general manag- "HELLO. ptate of terror, ing. Thousands are flee- er for Armour Co.; Edward Morris, president of Morris Co.; Francis A. The flight of residents from Pekin continued, thousands abandoning their homes and starting for the art joining provinces. The majority are seeking refuge it, Tientsin. Persist- ent rumors that the rebel command- ers are planning to occupy the city ate causing widespread alarm. With all the inhabitants either dea.-i or-seeking safety in flight and the rebels still unpre-pared to give bat- tip. Nanking continues to be the scene of fighting and fire. Mutiny has broken out in the army of General Chang and the imperial army is divided against itself. Gen Chang -virtually is waging an inde- pendent rebellion. The Nanking viceroy is helpless. He has reneatedly urged General Chang to follow a more mo-derate pol- icy and made a strong effort to per- suade him not to order a general massacre. Nanking is almost a complete ruin. The mutineers and Manchus are vielng with each other in destroying propertv. Several hundred troops ware Irlled in clashes in different parts of the city. Gen Chang sent a force of men to annihilate the mutinous troops encamped at Mulingkwan about miles from th" south gate o'f Nanking, but General Hsu, the mutinous commander, had withdrawn further inland for the pur- pose of obtaining ammunition at Shanghai. Word was received from Yuan Shi Kal static a; that he would reach Pe- kin Tuppday The legations declare fate of Pekin rests with Yuan Advices frcm Hankow state that Yu- an i? endeavoring to induce the pow- ers to in and put an end to the reoellion in (he Yangtze valley. Steamer Washington is Driven Ashore on Oregon Coast in Gale and is Breaking Up. Fowler, director of Swift Co.; Thomas J. Connors, superintendent of Armour Co.; Louis H. Heyman, man- ager for Morris Co. A special pannel of 150 men has been summoned for the jury. Hun- dreds of witnesses have been called. It is expected the trial will proceed for several months. All technicalities have been swept aside, the defendants have nleaded not euilty and all that remains is the trial. Most of the government's efforts will he directed to show the purpose of the organization of the National Packing Co. The government charges that through this organization the packers w-ere able to control the meat industry United Staes Senator W S Ken- >on will be associated as special coun- sel with United States Distiict Attor- ney .Tames H. Wilkerson in the prose- cution. Pierce Butler of St. Poul, Parton Corneaa of Washington, James Sh cell an and El wood Godman, chief p.ssistant district attorney, will aid in the prosecution. BIG TEMPERATURE DROP WITH GALES Eight Persons Killed and Nine! Mercury Down To 13 Above Seriously injured in Wis- consin Cyclone. BIG STEAMERS ASHORE AND SAILORS MISSING Zero, Monday, But Relief Is in Sight. CONSIDERABLE DAMAGE CAUSED BY HIGH WfND Cold Ads to Suffering of Vic- Tombstones Moved and Trees tims of Storms in Many Sections of Country, Intimates That He Would Not Use Them If 12 Fair ed Men Are Found. LOS ANGELES, Not only seven veniremen remaining available attorneys in the McNamara trial today resumed the work of trying to secure 12 impartial jurors. But three per- manent jurors are seated. Juror Sex- ton has been seated. District Attorney Fredericks resum- ed interrogation of venireman Gril- ling, passe I for cause, Friday; but, whom the state now wants to elimin- ate because he has a strong preju- poor try to imitate the rich, and get poorer; the rich try to imitate the poor and get richer. Forecast: Fair and not quite so cold to- night; Tuesday in- creasing cloudiness and warmer. Temperature at 1 a. m., 13; one year ago, 35. Sun rises Tuesday at a. m., and sets at p. m., (standard time.) Maximum wind velocity for 24 hours ending at noon today. 24 miles PEORTA, 111., Nov. fireman was killed, another seriously Injureu and 70 guests forced to flee to the ice covered street when fire early to- day destroyed the National hotel. The loss will exceed EVANSVILLE, Ind., Nov. tective William Wilson, of this city who shot and killed William Walters last Sunday and seriously wounded Robert Finley, was indicted by a grand jury here for first-degree mur- der. ALLEGED SIATEE IS STOICAL IN COUBT dice against General Otis and west, at Sunday afternoon. Times. Juror Sexton has asked the i --------------------------_ court to be excused because his brother is dying and Judge Bordwell took the matter under advisement. If the condition of Sexton's brother becomes worse he probably will be excused. The defense will eliminate Major Brewster Kenyon, a million- aire oil man. because it is discovered he is a great admirer of Detective Burns. "If we can find twelve fair minded men among the talesmen being exam- Entries Closed Monday And Fine Arts Commission Will Decide January 20. Fixing January 20, of next year as the time, and Washington, D. C., as the place for passing on the designs for the Perry Memorial at Put'-in Bay, the Fine Arts commission appointed by President Taft, disDosed of a num- ber of other matters at a meeting at the West House Sunday afternoon. The session was attended by the following members- Daniel H. Burn- ham, if Chicago, Frederick Law dim- stead and Daniel C. French, of New j York, Charles Moore, of Detroit, ami] Thomas Hastings, of Washington. In order that the persons who have already entered the competi- tion for the big design and whoss names have been made known to the f BOATS !N TROUBLE. boat with five aboard missing; steamer John T. McW'lJiams ashore; seieral ves- sels have drspeiate battle with XEYV with fourteen aboard ashore off Fire Island. ASTORIA. steams Washington ashore; Ufa savets unable to reach her. ASHTABULA Centurion ashore on breakwater. SAI'LT STB. Western Star ashore in mid- channel; kept afloat by pumps. J. Q Riddle aground on beach after dragging anchors. v 5 t J t -s j CLEVELAND, 0, Nov. cold wave continued over Ohio today. The temperature was 15 above zero at Cleveland this masiriagr-ia at while Columbus and Sincinnau re- ported 13. In the larger cities grea: suffering has resulted in the pooier districts from luck of fuel and charity organizations are being pushed to the utmost to meet demands Shipping was still tied up owing to high winds. I Many minor accidents were reported due to the cold and snow. The steamer City of St. Ignace ar- rived here at 1 o'clock, seven hours late. She had a rough trip, but no alarm was felt concerning her. Blown Down At Oakland- Water in Bay Low, Could Not Make Trip. DETROIT, Nov. passen- gers spent Saturday night and Sunday on the C. steamer Western States because the big vessel was un- able to force her way down Lake Erie against the terrific gale. After bat- tling against the storm for more than 20 hours the steamer was finally com- pelled to ghe up and return to De- troit. The steamer City of Detroit from Cleveland reached Detroit at this moining. three hours late. She was covered with ice from stem to ster VHP covered with ice from stem to stern. Score Are Lost. CHICAGO. 111., Nov. than a ?core of lives were lost and over a million and a half dollars damage done to property and shipping by With the tremendous drop IT the temparature from 70 degrees at o'clock Sunday morning, to 29 degrees four hours later, with a terrific west wind hurling itself upon the vicinity and a snow storm accompanying, San- dusky ,had its first tsucri of bliz- zard weather Sunday for the win- jer season of 1911-12. And the 29 degrees registered Sunday morning was eclipsed Monday morning, when at o'clock, the thermometer at trie govern- ment station here registered 13 degrees above zzro. Fair and not so cold for Monday night is weather bureau's prediction with still warmer weather Tuesday. Saturday's mild weather made the 41 degree drop of early Sunday morning felt all the more. From late Saturday night until early Sunday evening, the wind velocity was exceedingly high, blowing from 3R reckoned by five minute records. The" maximum velocity was reached Sun- day morning at 8 o'clock, when, the per hour mark was but rhose who tried to sleep Saturday night and early Sunday morning while blinds rattled will be surprised to know that it wasn't blowing harder during the mcht. The temperature drop of Sunday morning was a rapid decline. The fall of from Sunday morning to IS de- grees on 'Monday, however, was a grad- ual one of 24 hours' duration. While reports from nearby places indicate considerable property damage as a result of the heavy thera was little or no damage in Santosky. Immediately south of the city limits however, tae blow was felt in no un- certain manner At Oakland cemetery the wind caused some damage and cut some queer pranks. Superintendent Schlenk reports that the huge John H. Hudson monumental shaft, which stands 16 feet high and which, is said to weigh about five tons, was shifted nearly a foot from its original base. In different parts of the cemetery, head- stones of the slab variety were blown down. Three giant pine trees, all over 50 feet in height and nearly two feet thick at the trunk, were snapped off five or six feet from the bottom, like saplings. Small shrubbery was dam- aged also. Naturally the blow was harder afc the islands and on Marblehead penin- sula than in Sandusky. At Marble- the hangar, 40" by 6ft feet, in CINCIKNATI, 0., Nov. men were burned, two of them seri- ined, we will accept them without ex-1 ougl toda wh u in the hausting our twenty peremptory chal- said Clarence S. Darrow, chief counsel for James B. McNamara. Tudor Boiler Manufacturing company plant They were employed in thaw- storm which swept the upper middle I whicli the Iar-e Ellithorpe airship was public, may be protected, the the last tno davs All was blown down and the big report great machine wrecked. George H. Elli- among the poor from me intense coM thorpe inventor and builder of the ma- which followed. Revised reports chme. had invested practically all his show that not less than 13 persons i m. bmniins: cf the machine were lulled in Wiscinsin. Two were organization ot a company to com- recommended to thp building committee that, the identity of others entering the contest, mignt also no announced, and the rule against this procedure abrogated. The commission also wants to know just what its powers and those of the building committee are. relative to the awarding of premiums as second, third and fourth prizes, and I frozen in Minnesota and Snath Da kota, Cyclone Kills Eight as to the final selection of a design! .TANESVILLE. Wis.. Nov. plete it The machine may be re- paired, however The water was so low in the bay Sunday that the steamer Arrow could not set out Ste rested on bottom at the Columbus avenue slip. Monday af- District Attorney John D. Fredericks ing out a pipe, when the explosion i tlle monument Webster P_ Hun-' cyclone which swept over a district a j ternoon the bad raised snffi- shares this view, so Wat, with three p sprayed them Tjrith. the flaming liquid. jurors already sworn, a lucky combin- ation may furnish a complete jury sooner than expected. It was the first intimation from the defense, however, j that it might not use all the challenges j at its disposal. j Attorney Darrow explained that he would rather suhnit merits of the case to a fair JITV tvnn ex- pend upon a. i-fc.eraal by a court on the record thus far made, j though he believed there has crept in already on the of tales- i men, sufficient ground for an appeal. MUST ACCEPT DEEDS IN FOREIGN LANGUAGE I tington, secretary of the commission, said Monday morning that he thought the matter of premiums b9 left entirelv to the Fine Arts Corn- Special to The Star-Journal: C'OLOrBrS. O., Xov. ney Geneial hogan in an ci !ii or to- daj holds that a deed written in a fireign language must be accepted by the county recorder and placed on record. mile in width and 20 miles in length caused eight deaths, seriously injured nine more and slightly injured numer- ous persons Saturday night and strew- mission. and that the bnildinsr com-1 ed the country with the bodies of mittee v.ould take no hand in the i dead animals, wrecks of buildings and selection of the design. The sti stead of rubk1 'other debris. All wiies were down cientiy to allov.- the steamer to get away for the islands. The barge >H- roia, towed clewn from Toledo to take en a cargo of from the Hanna docks, rode out the storm at anchor off The barge was still at aneho- Monday mrrninr. Craft of was made that in- and it was not until Sunday that theja'most every dos-Tii-cion made no at- on a certain pricT outside world learned of the disaster, i tempts to get out or in the harbor Sua- foot Cor the memorial, no! The thermometer drooped to o GOMPERS UPHELD AND DEFENDED M'NAMARAS The MarMehead life saving bp considered, unless in the and added to the suffering of in reau'ness at all times to o-nnioi: of the fine arts commission, who were left homeless by t'ae storm f 9.uf "'n case massing vessel was cost limit, alrpadv aarrced upon 'door and found dead in the hog! The sudden wave caused actual According to Secretary Huntinsr-'pen i suffering in many places in the city. ton, there were fifty-three contest-' The arc Anton. Alice tind Res- Failure to lay m a supply of coal be- ants for the design when ho left gio Schmidt, Helen Austin, Mrs. Jorn''ore this- caused numerous families to Saturtlnv nieht. The en- Oiowder, Mrs. Leu trios were scheduled to close Mon-'Lemz and Amy Kerban Albert! Tho over Sunday night freeze formed dav. will "die. and man} others 'lce cnve East En-l aivl On account of the rough weather, are seriously hurt. (Continued on Page 5) rt'l other small bodies of water in i fho tklnitv (Continued on Page 2) ASTORIA. Ore. Nov. two members of the ciew already washed overboard, 47 persons on the wiecked steamer Washington aie facing death st Cape Disappointment todaj. The Washington was riiiven ashore in gale and life have made un- successful efforts to throw hues to the craft. At 10 o'clock this morning steamer started breaking up Chances of rescuing the passengers and ciew seem remote fhe Washington wireless operator Bashed a distress signal to Astoria and J-oitland before his apparatus was pul! nut of commission by ihe gale The life s'vers here immediately rushed to the siene but owing to the terrific tund and the high sea running were unable to approach close enough (o take off the imperiled persons Fearing the vessel would break up the life savers attempted to shoot a life line across the vessel but each attempt failed. Two members of the crew were washed overboard and drowned while attempting to reach the life line. Three are Drowned. FORT TERRY. L. I., Nov. 13.- ATLANTA. Ga.. Nov. 13 Denounc- of all volume of the products of labsr ing as the foes of labor, "subservient into the hands of laboi. We j__0'> ererv form oC aristocracy and "injunction judges and the bring tQ end mstltutjens j McNamara prosecution In Los Ange-j which refuse to TPCOgnize the pe0pir-i les, President Gompers todaj deliv-ias the origin of legislation, of justice, ered his annual address before the and of domination. I convention of the American "Federa- "Striking and irrefutable evidence has i tion of Lavor. Secretary Mornsan been furnished that these submitted his annual report shoeing principles aie the true ones on which the federation now has mem- labor mav effect rvi-iv and continuous- 1 hers. lv its just rausf Tne s In the annual report of President verest blows ever dealt class privilege j Gompers he assumes for the federation plutocratic domination, and judicial: 'a progressive attitude towaid the big sreed for power were made possible' national questions. last jeai the forces of He also devotes much oC his report racy built up in the course! to a discussion of the "kidnaping" of of in vnfh the es- the McNarrara brothers, dec'ares them tabli-heri pol.cj of the American Fed-1 innocent, and relates his action in that oration of r-ibor. T to the everts matter before the congressional com- tak'ng plnro especially en the mittr-p to which he appealed in an ef- eitVr-r in thf1! fon t> 'ipvp tup and promotion or initiative.; p-rpTly amended as regasds extradi- referendum, nrd reca'i or in acts of! BING'S AEROPLANE SAFE A3 FIRE SWEEPS SHOP AND GALE DAMAGES ANOTHER MACHINE Mrs. Jane Quinn. survivor of three husbands, two- of whom died from i tiuu masses of Regarding; the policy of the Ameri- purely dcmoTat'c Urough can FcdFrat'Or. he savs1 "It is iintrup tbat fi-f'eration is conFervative in th-- sense of dissent- from intended to af- Those events have brinant'y and con- vincingly of the i peonl" We loo1' forward now that the principles and the mech-j far-reaching cr-aiges in our politi- snism of the people's powe" have Striking Drivers Will Hold iass Meeting Tonight and Police Fear Trouble, NEW YORK. Xov streets j hich with p -i.ii'1 gjrtnj.e and tbj t c sty t- i1 thrr-'- '.vas ev- cry indication the carpciis- sioners wxvaH be cornered to assm.s control and clean cit'v A nir's pipetinc of the wa-t-is drivers apii Helpers 3" -s ca'.lf-l 'or a, ;r frsr troub'C Police today and JIayor Gavnor ?rid the strike- wou'd not tt was anmittfft 4ft of i d U'at trc fecf -Two Witors coinprising the crew and the raptains wife sf the schooner Edith tvcre drowned when the boat was ii.ished ashore. Tho captain res- cued insane from his experiences. mysteriously inflicted gunshot wounds, jcal institutions We would conserve discovered, made cfear and applied, f> iu waj- at Geoige Bin0" lucky Whik- Simd.ii'-; gale was tte a charge of having caused the death as a whole, which means first of all countly to popular ideals and aspira- iwnolftfi'. at .MsrbiuUead. fire was gutting Btngs shop m this city, er last life paitner. John Quinii. The the n-visses. bat we would change as tions the Bins he lacked an young woman was stoical all through as possible whatever has been The secretary and treasurer's renort'tive .oroner's inquest. when her 'injurious to rjir- countiy. and presented by Secretary Morrison t in hiVmachint- late husband's bloodstained night shirt, i h to tho masses. We would abolish tv receipts for thP voar f> ha-" n0u f matnine. -r.t'-j. stored in a building across the stsvit from i poit-tl that York street that tar wepf-T :s col'; is onlv thing saj. that v tircventec! r J! n.oort pounds of rarbo'Ic j itious; fasi siclo bv bed, was exhibited. when he "was s'U't in wonVl a democracy, and would turn the pure' tide and j acro-s tho testing The pictur% from in tho macliHw. of sufficient ;h he has skimmed photo In SthM'Sisman, shows York hold then'selves "i rouil mediate strike duty jtujii i H EWSPAPERl INEWSPAPERl   

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